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What is the best Linux distro?

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MX Linux is the best.

In reply to: What is the best Linux distro?

MX Linux is the best since it's fast, based on Debian stable branch with systemD disabled and it has nothing to do with Ubuntu which means it has no Ubuntu data collection. You don't need to use the ancient antiquated counter intuitive Gibberish command line with MX Linux. Also it has MX tools and MX Tweak that makes thing easy.

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Definitely agree!

In reply to: MX Linux is the best.

I had been using Puppy Linux to teach myself this OS for some months, and making little progress. Last month I bought CD of MX Linux 17.1 from OSDisc.com. It has since replaced Puppy Linux, and I am using it exclusively in LiveCD mode to learn Linux. It is almost as fast as Puppy, much easier to use, and rather fun to fool with. Relevant links:
https://mxlinux.org/user_manual_mx17/mxum.pdf
https://www.osdisc.com/products/mx

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You will then be happy...

In reply to: Definitely agree!

...when you install it, because a DVD is slower but when it's on HDD or SSD, it runs like a race horse!

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I think your're right!

In reply to: You will then be happy...

I have about twenty distros in my CD collection (LiveCDs bought from OSDisc over the past few years), and been testing them out. Not one does what MX Linux does. Running as LiveCD mode, each one requires me to fuss with it to connect to the internet, and the crapola keeps on going after that. MX Linux connects to the internet automatically, does pretty much everything else for me thereafter, and is just plain easy to use. I have decided to have my tech guy install it to my secondary HDD next month.

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I use this linux friendly long range wifi device

In reply to: I think your're right!

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I wouldn't know about that...

In reply to: I use this linux friendly long range wifi device

I banned wifi, bluetooth, etc., when the blackhatters and script kiddies cracked WEP. Everyone tried to get me to switch to WPA, but I told them it was 'fools-gold', and to give up on wifi, but nobody listened. Said I was too paranoid. Then the supposedly unhackable WPA got cracked, and everyone ran to WPA2...."this time it's bulletproof" one told me. I see there is a WPA3 on the horizon, which tells me everything I need to know. It's an 'arms race' I don't care to compete in, as wifi offers little to offset the big risk.

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WPA is difficult to hack

In reply to: I wouldn't know about that...

I wont' mention the tools, but the methods can require hours of monitoring even up to days and the final part is only by a "dictionary" attack on the gathered information. The quickest method is capturing a "handshake" but that requires someone actually signing onto the system at the time you are monitoring. There's another method that speeds that up a bit, but still requires a "client" to be connnected. It's not worth the effort just to get some free internet access when xfinity hotspots can be had for $20 a month in many places, $50 if you go month by month without year contract. The ONLY thing that would make hacking someone's internet router is if you were targeting that particular individual for some reason. So, it's fairly safe.

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I'd add...

In reply to: WPA is difficult to hack

...that you'd have to be in proximity to monitor/capture the encrypted wifi transmissions and that can be made even more difficult if the person uses his power settings in a router to lower the broadcast strength so it will suffice for inside his house but it's intercept distance outdoors be very limited. That can be tested by the owner simply by seeing how many bars he can get to his home wifi on his cellphone as he walks further and further away from the home signal. WEP however is easily breakable, so WPA is what everyone should be using now.

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Don't you mean WPA2?

In reply to: WPA is difficult to hack

WPA from my research years ago was under 10 minutes with WPA2 being something you put into a cloud computing farm for an answer in 24 hours. The cost for a WPA2 cloud crack was a few dollars.

That was 5 years ago and why I thought we were overdue for an update.

But what can you do with this WPA or WPA2 password (that's all you get!)? For most it was to get free Internet access. If the host system had unsecured shares well that was their choice. In a word, nope and never have an unsecured file or printer share. EVEN ON ETHERNET since it's too easy to install a connection.

And in a business that thought they were secure because they had no WiFi, again there were small devices that looked like power adapters to give access to the network.

Lesson? Banishing WiFi does not secure a business network.

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WPA

In reply to: Don't you mean WPA2?

I use that as a general reference to all versions of it. Maybe in future I'll use WPA* instead. Wink

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So far as I know there is no 'magic bullet' for security.

In reply to: Don't you mean WPA2?

Installing keylogger software remotely is easier and a whole lot less risky than installing a hardware keylogger, and cracking wifi is easier and less risky than installing "small devices that looked like power adapters". "Banishing WiFi does not secure a business network", but it does make it a lot more secure. Banishing all the 'remote this and remote that' junk in your OS does not guarantee against script kiddies getting into your PC, but it does make it a lot more secure. Security comes via layers, and not from some singular 'magic bullet'. WEP was cracked. WPA was cracked. I am quite confident to predict that WPA2 will be cracked, and when WPA3 comes along...sooner or later it will be cracked. This is a losing game, and one I choose not to play, as the few benefits of wifi does not come close to offsetting the risk.

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I am aware of the tools.

In reply to: WPA is difficult to hack

Most are contained in Kali Linux, Parrot Security OS , and a few other distros. The rest are easily obtained at the various script-kiddie sites. That's about as far as my awareness goes, or needs to go, as I don't fool with wifi. A quickie Google search turns up the fact that there are apparently more than one kind of WPA2 (https://www.howtogeek.com/204697/wi-fi-security-should-you-use-wpa2-aes-wpa2-tkip-or-both/), which I didn't know. I am aware that wifi spying is about more than just mooching off anothers connection (https://thebossmagazine.com/wi-fi-spying/), and old enough to recall the furor over Google's Street View cars (https://www.wired.com/2012/05/google-wifi-fcc-investigation/). However you want to view it, not having wifi crapola is a lot safer than having it. I'll stick to wired-only connections. My remotes for TV, VCR, and DVD recorder is as wireless as I ever need to get.

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Linux Mint

In reply to: MX Linux is the best.

There are so many distributions of Linux it can be very confusing. For the average general user I like the Mint series, specifically 19-19.1, it is a very easy transition from MS Windows, again, for the average user.

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Best Linux distro

In reply to: What is the best Linux distro?

Elementary OS is the best option available as it's craftly designed and looks superb. It has amazing desktop usability and one demerit is it does not include unwanted preinstalled apps. For those who are new to Linux, Linux Mint would be a good option as it contains a huge amount of customization option.

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the best linux distro

In reply to: What is the best Linux distro?

i vote manjaro linux Grin

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Re:

In reply to: the best linux distro

Manjaro is the worst distro with the worst lying developers with the worst community.

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You may be pleased to hear then...

In reply to: the best linux distro

...that Spatry (cup of linux) will be back with new videos on Youtube middle of September. I doubt the first one will be about Manjaro, more likely be Mint 19 he told me in an email, but he no doubt will be doing some more on his favorite Manjaro too.

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Ubuntu is Best

In reply to: What is the best Linux distro?

Hello,
Ubuntu is best for all users.
User Friendly, Easy to use.

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Re: Ubuntu is Best

In reply to: Ubuntu is Best

Unbuntu has data collection and is prostituted out to Amazon. Also Canonical makes Unbuntu and they collaborate with Microsoft.

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Re: U(n?)buntu

In reply to: Re: Ubuntu is Best

And what is the relationship (positive or negative) between being user friendly and easy to use or being the best on one side and being associated with Amazon or Microsoft on the other side?

Isn't the Amazon Echo better than any open source equivalent (if there is one)?
Isn't Microsoft Azure better than any open source equivalent (if there is one)?

Post was last edited on July 25, 2018 2:19 PM PDT

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Re: U(n?)buntu

In reply to: Re: U(n?)buntu

It has to do with the lack of privacy. While the data collection is small with Ubuntu it's still collects data even when you select no. By selecting no it doesn't collect as much data. While the type of data may be harmless for most people it can be an issue for some. Data collection is spying and spying usually starts small but always grows. Amazon Echo is spyware. Microsoft Azure is spyware and malware. At least you can shut off the Amazon Echo to stop the spying but it's questionable what Amazon does with what the Amazon Echo hears as it hears everything. When you use Microsoft Azure you have given away everything to Microsoft and they have full control of it. Microsoft makes money from it by sell your all you data. This is how identity theft happens and other bad things. Don't put anything on any Cloud service that you don't want others to see.

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From what little I've read...

In reply to: Re: U(n?)buntu

Ubuntu is now claiming to have ceased with the spying component, "Since Ubuntu version 16.04, the spyware search facility is now disabled by default" according to gnu.org., but in my opinion, once that line has been crossed, the probability is that it will be crossed again. Also "disabled by default" is far different than actual removal, implies a begrudging acquiescence to user pressure, and leaves open the possibility (if not likelihood) that it shall return. Frankly, I am not inclined to trust Ubuntu so long as this component remains, and especially so long as those in charge that allowed this spyware into the OS remain in power. Either this decision to include Unity spyware was made by stupid fools that had no idea what they were doing, or it was made by greedy fools that knew exactly what they were doing....either way, I would consider Ubuntu too risky to use for the foreseeable future, and so too for any distro that is based wholly on Ubuntu (or incorporates Unity), at least until it's proven free of this toxicity.

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Re: From what little I've read...

In reply to: From what little I've read...

Canonical is lying about Ubuntu. It has data collection on by default. When you disable data collection Canonical knows that you have disabled it including the time and your I.P. address. The only thing Canonical has turned off by default is the data collection to only Amazon and not Canonical which has been collaborating with Microsoft which is well know for Windows 10 being spyware and malware.

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That would not surprise me!

In reply to: Re: From what little I've read...

That Canonical sold out its endusers is clear enough. That they stopped (or claimed to stop) with the spying only to begrudgingly bow to user pressure is equally clear. If it was all a lie, that would not surprise me. Like I said, once the line is crossed there is no way to unring the bell, and such companies (or distros in this case), must always be suspect. A similar situation exists with another newbie friendly distro called Deepin, as to whether or not it is spyware-free, or spyware-laden.

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Deepin and Kylin

In reply to: That would not surprise me!

Both are produced by China. Knowing how China is about internet control, I'd not trust either. However Deepin is a remarkable Linux system, if you don't worry about spyware.

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I did not know that

In reply to: Deepin and Kylin

......Ubuntu/Canonical had Chinese origin, but that would go a long way to explain the pro Big Bro attitude....in fact, it should of been expected. Deepin seems to have the best look of any distro I have seen, and according to all the Youtube reviews, it offers a lot more than eyecandy. Unfortunately, all that just seems to be the fat worm concealing the sharp hook. Cursory Google research indicates that a past version was spyware-free, but all versions since are spyware-packed. I'd say split the difference, and avoid all versions of Deepin and Ubuntu, unless one has joined the herd that constantly howl about how they don't care about privacy, chant 'privacy is dead', etc.

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that's why I use MINT

In reply to: I did not know that

Started by a French ex-pat who lives in Great Britain now and seems devoted to keep the spyware off the distro.

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I got a Linux Mint CD from OSDisc.

In reply to: that's why I use MINT

Tried it for about three hours, then went back to MX Linux. Mint did most of what MX does, but it just ain't as easy to use. Never did figure out how to change Mint's gawd-awful bland wallpaper. Was easy for me to find how to change the MX equally crappy wallpaper into the 'twilight lake' scene. Not sure just how privacy-conscious MX is, but I guess it's good enough to teach myself Linux on.

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Backgrounds

In reply to: I got a Linux Mint CD from OSDisc.

In Linux Mint 17.03 MATE the backgrounds are in the "Appearances" section, under Accessories, Preferences (or All). I tried Kali the other day to test hacking my reflashed with DD-WRT router. Other than the hacking exploits, I found it deficient to use. It didn't even include the very useful "inxi" command in terminal. It also seems the kernel number serves as it's "version" designation, since it's a "rolling edition" and the command "uname -a" shows the kernel version and no edition number.

It's definitely ONLY a hacking linux version, but does include a firefox ESR version, and one can add thunderbird to it. I felt it was unwieldy to use and interface similar to older Ubuntu in some ways but with a floating bar. When using firefox ESR, it would disappear from the title bar at the top and only clicking on the icon in the floating bar would bring it back on top. The resolutions in the 32 bit version I tried were limited too. At least the sound and wifi worked with no configuration needed. The Settings area was simple. I didn't go any deeper into it other than the purpose I wanted to test it with.

Post was last edited on August 30, 2018 2:32 PM PDT

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That explains it!

In reply to: Backgrounds

Think I gave up before I got that far. MX Linux has spoiled me. I just click on the black&white square at the bottom left, that opens the popup, click on 'all', scroll down to 'desktop' and its done. Same with the 'firewall' and that gawd-awful 'screensaver' (that ones has gotta go!). Kali is outside my skill-set. I can't even get TAILS, Kodachi, or any of the security-based distros to connect to the internet...all quite useless in my incapable hands. At least I got MX!

Have you tried Parrot Security? I hear its great if you know what you're doing, and crappy if you're a novice like me. I have it in my collection, but not yet tried it. Still stinging from my failures with TAILS, Kodachi, Subgraph, and Vatlator. I'm sticking with MX....Linux even I can use.

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