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What is a good Digital dSLR for a begginer?

I'm really into taking pictures at night or of scenery. Can anybody recommend a good dSLR camera for a begginer. Take into fact that I have no experience handling cameras. I was thinking about buying Nikon D80.

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DSLR for the beginner?

In reply to: What is a good Digital dSLR for a begginer?

bboyswoosh87, WOW! The Nikon D80 or the D200 is not a beginner's camera at all. They are the top-of-the-line professional digital cameras. Depending on the lens, that camera could cost you a few thousand dollars.
What kind of night-time photograph and scenery?

My suggestion is to ask our moderator, Joe Randolph.

Passing your question on?
Hang-in until Joe responds to you or other forum members do.

Welcome. I am interested in a Nikon D80 also. Not night-time photography.

-Kevin

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DSLR for the beginner

In reply to: What is a good Digital dSLR for a begginer?

You should take a good look at the new Nikon D40X.

This camera is aimed at the first time camera buyer.
It has lots of help features built into the menu.

It will take you years (and years) to outgrow that camera.
And when you do, you can still use any lenses you bought on a newer Nikon DSLR.

...
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Actually...

In reply to: What is a good Digital dSLR for a begginer?

You should save your money by purchasing a Nikon D40, not a D40x. The D40 is a great camera, the D40x has very little over it, and nothing you're likely to miss starting out. I would save the cash and buy yourself another lens, like the 55-200mm VR Nikkor, which would give you some stabilized zoom power at a high quality and a very decent price.

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Nikon D40

In reply to: Actually...

The Nikon D40 does have a remarkable fast flash synch up to 1/500, like the old Nikon D70. This can freeze fast action with flash better than the D40x. If you like to use flash at night for low light actions, this is something you may want to consider.

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Beginner D-SLR and night scenery

In reply to: What is a good Digital dSLR for a begginer?

The Nikon D40x or other entry level D-SLRs will do quite well with nighttime still photos or night light special effect. You will also need a tripod and a remote or cable release, especially for long exposure shots.

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Help

In reply to: Beginner D-SLR and night scenery

What is long exposure shots? Sorry I am very new to this. I want to learn more about taking pictures. I Love taking them.

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long exposures

In reply to: Help

A shutter speed of one second or longer (up to 30 seconds, or a few minutes, or a few hours) is considered a long exposure. Long shutter speeds can produce effects like motion blur, or soft water shots, or red streaks of light from passing cars. To do a long exposure, you'll need a tripod, otherwise your hand motion will cause everything in the picture to be blurred, which is no good thing!

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Example

In reply to: Help

Here is an example of long shutter speed but for a different reason:

A picture of my old trusty Canon AE1 (35mm film SLR).

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v159/randol9p9/IMG_0638_1024.jpg

This was taken, using a low illumination table-top light box.

I wanted a photo with plenty of depth of field and no noise.

So I put the camera I was using into Aperture Priority mode and set the aperture to f/16 and the ISO to 100.
The camera automatically chose the correct shutter speed, which was 3.2 seconds.

The camera was mounted on a tripod and I used the 10 second delay shutter release so I would not jiggle the camera when the shutter tripped.

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long exposure

In reply to: Help

When you leave the shutter open for longer period of time, there is more light that can reach your camera's sensor. For still photos, this is usually done in low light or night photography, so that you can avoid using high ISO and digital noise. You can use a lower ISO, and get a cleaner and more saturated photo, like the nice photo posted by snapshot2. This works really well for lighted buildings at night. But you will need tripod to avoid blurring.
When you open the shutter for longer period, you also are subject to motion blurring. This is sometimes intentional but sometimes an unwanted effect. You can be creative with motion blurring. It can add a sense of motion and dynamic to your photo, but make sure you have some focused still background to provide the contrast. Otherwise it can appear as a bad shot. Flowing water, fireworks and streaks of moving lights are some common special effects with long exposure shots. Some people may even leave the shutter open for a very long time, and use a black card or cap to open/close the lens, to create a serially recorded image. For example, you can record 5 different expressions of your face on the same photo, or record different positions of the moon over the sky or moving constellations using this kind of technique. Here is a link with examples:

http://www.danheller.com/tech-longexp.html

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Long exposure

In reply to: long exposure

Of course you have to be careful not to over-expose your photo when using long shutter speed.

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