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What do all these terms mean?

by jwmetzger / October 12, 2011 6:15 AM PDT

I have a Sony str de-845 receiver. The switch to the speakers only operates if you stand and hold it in position. I would fix it myself, but Sony doesn't allow for that. I took it apart to see if anything was loose. While doing so, I actually pulled a wire loose. It is black coming out of the power of the volume control. I can't see anywhere that it might have been connected. It appears that it might be a ground wire and connect to the body in some way. I would like to put it back together to see if it might work. (You know how sometimes that fixes things?) Another question. Since I will probably have to replace this receiver, I have been shopping a lot on the internet. Many of the terms for parts and features of receivers are new to me. Is there some place on the internet I can find definitions for these terms? Some features are way above my needs (i.e. streaming and internet) as I a forced to have satellite internet. Any help will be appreciated.

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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by jwmetzger

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I'd start with google. THEN !!!
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 13, 2011 3:42 AM PDT

Then if you hit a brick wall with "h.914" which isn't covered well, ask what others can add to that.
Bob

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confusing
by jwmetzger / October 13, 2011 4:19 AM PDT

What is h.914? I was really looking for a glossary of some sort on the terms like Audyssey, Dolby and such. I don't know what the difference is. I can't just pick up and go to Best Buy to ask someone. I live on a farm in the middle of nowhere. My ears are 64 years old like the rest of me. I want something that might make dialog easier to understand and also to enjoy good music. The reviews on CNET are great if you understand what what they are talking about.
BTW, I discovered that my broken receiver had no HDMI port, so that will be a ditch anyway. We have an IPod, but a usb connection is fine, I don't need aiplay. Thank for your help.

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There might be such a glossary.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 13, 2011 4:22 AM PDT
In reply to: confusing

But as things move so fast we turn to using google. I used a term that would have us turn to google to see if such was out there and of any interest.

Bob

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Confusing
by 3coursedinner / October 13, 2011 6:09 AM PDT
In reply to: confusing
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Thanks
by jwmetzger / October 13, 2011 9:08 AM PDT
In reply to: Confusing

This was more of what I was looking for. I will print it off and study it. I want this system to last longer than the last. Technology seems to advance exponentially, but I try to keep up with it. (It impresses my children and grandchildren).

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h.914?
by Pepe7 / October 13, 2011 4:32 AM PDT

That one's new to me. Where did you see a reference to that (voice?) codec?

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Such things are in committee.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / October 13, 2011 4:39 AM PDT
In reply to: h.914?

Just to give you an idea of where I get such things. Look up the CTIA in San Diego this week.

This mention of CTIA has not much to do with audio glossaries that the OP is asking for.
Bob

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Answer
Reciever terms
by Dan Filice / October 12, 2011 7:25 AM PDT

Why not list the terms for which you need explanations? For the two that you listed (Streaming and Internet), do you not know what Internet is? The streaming function allows the receiver to access data (music, video) that is available to "Stream" from the Internet. That means that you need an Internet connection and a Modem that is connected either by a hard-wire connection or wirelessly, to either a TV, DVD player or receiver that has the ability to use the information that is streaming. Many components (TVs, DVD player, receivers) can connect to the Internet and allow one to access the digital data (music or movies) and listen or watch it in real-time.

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Terms
by jwmetzger / October 12, 2011 10:27 PM PDT
In reply to: Reciever terms

Of course I know what the internet is. I also know what streaming is. My connection isn't fast enough for streaming. That wasn't what I was asking. I wanted to know more about Audyssey MultEQ, Audyssey Dynamic Volume, Dolby Pro Logic IIxDTS-HD decoderDolby Digital PlusDolby DigitalDolby Pro Logic IIDTS decoderDTS-ES Matrix 6.1DTS Neo:6Dolby Pro Logic IIzDTS ExpressDTS-ES Discrete 6.1Dolby TrueHDDTS 96/24Dolby Digital Surround EX. That and what do the channel numbers 5.1 and 7.1 mean. I found out. And yes, I use Google. Sometimes it is difficult to ask a question in the right manner. I actually found a good article from About.com, under home theater. So basically, never mind. I don't need snide help.

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I'd say you are the one being snide here
by Pepe7 / October 13, 2011 12:59 AM PDT
In reply to: Terms

We aren't mind readers here, nor are we paid to help. If you don't specify the terms you do not understand, how can we possible know what you have in mind??

It's only difficult to ask a question in the right manner if you don't take the time to slow down enough to think about what you need to ask(!)

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Sorry, wasn't trying to be "snide"
by Dan Filice / October 13, 2011 3:58 AM PDT
In reply to: Terms

Your original posted question was difficult to follow and I mis-read it. Pepe7 and ahoi made some good suggestions. Yes, Google is a great tool and if you post what you need to ask you will see many answers.

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Answer
You heard of "google"?
by ahtoi / October 12, 2011 6:58 PM PDT

That's one good place to start your search.

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Answer
In addition to Google
by volvogirl / October 13, 2011 3:56 PM PDT

When I need to know something electronic I use Wikipedia.

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