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What could cause my CPU to be overworked

I read a few threads on this but couldn't find anything that seemed like an all encompassing fix. Each situation seems unique. I am experiencing freezing every few minutes for about half of a minute. This is happening in GTA: V among other games, but I'll focus on GTA to keep the issue in scope. I'll start with the things I have done:

-Lowered all graphics settings to the lowest settings
-Checked and reinstalled drivers
-Monitored temperatures, within limits
-Monitored CPU and memory usage, 70-100% and over 2,000 MB respectively
-Power cycle, cleaning, checked connections, unplugged peripherals in sequence
-I am not using any Razer devices and have no Razer processes running
-I have repeated all of this after a complete format of drives and fresh install of OS

Build from DXDiag

------------------
System Information
------------------
Time of this report: 9/18/2016, 12:12:09
Machine name: DESKTOP-ER5K55U
Operating System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit (10.0, Build 10586) (10586.th2_release.160906-1759)
Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
System Manufacturer: MSI
System Model: MS-7751
BIOS: V1.8
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3470 CPU @ 3.20GHz (4 CPUs), ~3.2GHz
Memory: 8192MB RAM
Available OS Memory: 8140MB RAM
Page File: 2140MB used, 7919MB available
Windows Dir: C:\WINDOWS
DirectX Version: 12
DX Setup Parameters: Not found
User DPI Setting: Using System DPI
System DPI Setting: 96 DPI (100 percent)
DWM DPI Scaling: Disabled
Miracast: Available, with HDCP
Microsoft Graphics Hybrid: Not Supported
DxDiag Version: 10.00.10586.0000 64bit Unicode

------------
DxDiag Notes
------------
Display Tab 1: No problems found.
Sound Tab 1: No problems found.
Sound Tab 2: No problems found.
Sound Tab 3: No problems found.
Input Tab: No problems found.

--------------------
DirectX Debug Levels
--------------------
Direct3D: 0/4 (retail)
DirectDraw: 0/4 (retail)
DirectInput: 0/5 (retail)
DirectMusic: 0/5 (retail)
DirectPlay: 0/9 (retail)
DirectSound: 0/5 (retail)
DirectShow: 0/6 (retail)

---------------
Display Devices
---------------
Card name: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
Manufacturer: NVIDIA
Chip type: GeForce GTX 970
DAC type: Integrated RAMDAC
Device Type: Full Device
Device Key: Enum\PCI\VEN_10DE&DEV_13C2&SUBSYS_39753842&REV_A1
Display Memory: 8129 MB
Dedicated Memory: 4058 MB
Shared Memory: 4070 MB
Current Mode: 1920 x 1080 (32 bit) (60Hz)
Monitor Name: Generic PnP Monitor
Monitor Model: VE247
Monitor Id: ACI2493
Native Mode: 1920 x 1080(p) (60.000Hz)
Output Type: HDMI
Driver Name: nvd3dumx.dll,nvwgf2umx.dll,nvwgf2umx.dll,nvwgf2umx.dll,nvd3dum,nvwgf2um,nvwgf2um,nvwgf2um
Driver File Version: 21.21.0013.7270 (English)
Driver Version: 21.21.13.7270
DDI Version: 12
Feature Levels: 12.1,12.0,11.1,11.0,10.1,10.0,9.3,9.2,9.1
Driver Model: WDDM 2.0
Graphics Preemption: DMA
Compute Preemption: DMA
Miracast: Not Supported
Hybrid Graphics GPU: Not Supported
Power P-states: Not Supported
Driver Attributes: Final Retail
Driver Date/Size: 8/25/2016 12:00:00 AM, 17619464 bytes
WHQL Logo'd: Yes
WHQL Date Stamp:
Device Identifier: {D7B71E3E-5082-11CF-9447-78191BC2D835}
Vendor ID: 0x10DE
Device ID: 0x13C2
SubSys ID: 0x39753842
Revision ID: 0x00A1
Driver Strong Name: oem54.inf:0f066de3ad0bda5c:Section089:21.21.13.7270Silly ci\ven_10de&dev_13c2
Rank Of Driver: 00D12001
Video Accel:
DXVA2 Modes: DXVA2_ModeMPEG2_VLD DXVA2_ModeVC1_D2010 DXVA2_ModeVC1_VLD DXVA2_ModeH264_VLD_Stereo_Progressive_NoFGT DXVA2_ModeH264_VLD_Stereo_NoFGT DXVA2_ModeH264_VLD_NoFGT DXVA2_ModeHEVC_VLD_Main DXVA2_ModeMPEG4pt2_VLD_Simple DXVA2_ModeMPEG4pt2_VLD_AdvSimple_NoGMC
Deinterlace Caps: {6CB69578-7617-4637-91E5-1C02DB810285}: Format(In/Out)=(YUY2,YUY2) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_PixelAdaptive
{F9F19DA5-3B09-4B2F-9D89-C64753E3EAAB}: Format(In/Out)=(YUY2,YUY2) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{5A54A0C9-C7EC-4BD9-8EDE-F3C75DC4393B}: Format(In/Out)=(YUY2,YUY2) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{335AA36E-7884-43A4-9C91-7F87FAF3E37E}: Format(In/Out)=(YUY2,YUY2) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_BOBVerticalStretch
{6CB69578-7617-4637-91E5-1C02DB810285}: Format(In/Out)=(UYVY,UYVY) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_PixelAdaptive
{F9F19DA5-3B09-4B2F-9D89-C64753E3EAAB}: Format(In/Out)=(UYVY,UYVY) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{5A54A0C9-C7EC-4BD9-8EDE-F3C75DC4393B}: Format(In/Out)=(UYVY,UYVY) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{335AA36E-7884-43A4-9C91-7F87FAF3E37E}: Format(In/Out)=(UYVY,UYVY) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_BOBVerticalStretch
{6CB69578-7617-4637-91E5-1C02DB810285}: Format(In/Out)=(YV12,0x32315659) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_PixelAdaptive
{F9F19DA5-3B09-4B2F-9D89-C64753E3EAAB}: Format(In/Out)=(YV12,0x32315659) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{5A54A0C9-C7EC-4BD9-8EDE-F3C75DC4393B}: Format(In/Out)=(YV12,0x32315659) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{335AA36E-7884-43A4-9C91-7F87FAF3E37E}: Format(In/Out)=(YV12,0x32315659) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_BOBVerticalStretch
{6CB69578-7617-4637-91E5-1C02DB810285}: Format(In/Out)=(NV12,0x3231564e) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_PixelAdaptive
{F9F19DA5-3B09-4B2F-9D89-C64753E3EAAB}: Format(In/Out)=(NV12,0x3231564e) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{5A54A0C9-C7EC-4BD9-8EDE-F3C75DC4393B}: Format(In/Out)=(NV12,0x3231564e) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY
{335AA36E-7884-43A4-9C91-7F87FAF3E37E}: Format(In/Out)=(NV12,0x3231564e) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=VideoProcess_YUV2RGB VideoProcess_StretchX VideoProcess_StretchY DeinterlaceTech_BOBVerticalStretch
{6CB69578-7617-4637-91E5-1C02DB810285}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC1,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{F9F19DA5-3B09-4B2F-9D89-C64753E3EAAB}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC1,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{5A54A0C9-C7EC-4BD9-8EDE-F3C75DC4393B}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC1,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{335AA36E-7884-43A4-9C91-7F87FAF3E37E}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC1,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{6CB69578-7617-4637-91E5-1C02DB810285}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC2,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{F9F19DA5-3B09-4B2F-9D89-C64753E3EAAB}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC2,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{5A54A0C9-C7EC-4BD9-8EDE-F3C75DC4393B}: Format(In/Out)=(IMC2,UNKNOWN) Frames(Prev/Fwd/Back)=(0,0,0) Caps=
{335AA36E-7884-43A4-9C91-7F87FAF3E37E}:

zulu317 has chosen the best answer to their question. View answer
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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by zulu317

Collapse -
That's a dump.

In reply to: What could cause my CPU to be overworked

Collapse -
Sorry?

In reply to: That's a dump.

I apologize for the format of the post, and the inconvenience that may have caused you. I appreciate your response nonetheless. I was unaware of the preferred use of Speccy and will conform in the future.

I've had the CPU for 5 years with no issues, running at 100% or otherwise. The difficulty in operation is a recent development and will happen whether the CPU is at 100% or not. Just noting that 100% is more often reached than it used to be.

Collapse -
It's just that a Speccy is easier to read.

In reply to: Sorry?

And things are easier to spot than a dump.
Dafydd.

Collapse -
Now that's a clue I can use.

In reply to: Sorry?

At 5 years we have a few things like an old car that need review and for me, I'd just do it.

1. Get out the canned air.

Yes, you wrote "Monitored temperatures, within limits" but did you monitor all the parts? That is, I have a laser spot thermometer to check out chips that don't have monitoring. This is simple stuff. PCs age and we must not fall for the monitoring trap.

2. At 5 years, thermal compound can dry and crack. So we do a clean and refurb job on the machine. Again, you may hit a client that monitors temps so be sure to charge the counter fee and return it as-is if they push back. Do not forget to thank them. (they'll be back or at another shop.)

3. At 5 years we can have motherboard, PSU or other board problems. Use your experience to watch for the signs of troubles in those areas. For the new to this folk, PSUs must be 50 to 100% over what's required to make it to 5 years. Here we have an old PC so let's put it on the Watt meter and see if they have 100% spare capacity.

4. More on the PSU. If you see a split rail PSU, you advise to change that.

Post was last edited on September 19, 2016 4:38 PM PDT

Collapse -
Thank you.

In reply to: Now that's a clue I can use.

Thank you for the responses, I did change the thermal paste and do a thorough cleaning. I did not think to use an IR thermometer however and will try this tonight. The board and CPU are both the same age, everything else has been replaced in the last year. I planned on replacing them in the near future anyway and will consider moving that up, dependant upon tonights results. Thanks again, you've been an asset.

Collapse -
Thank you.

In reply to: Now that's a clue I can use.

Thank you for the responses, I did change the thermal paste and do a thorough cleaning. I did not think to use an IR thermometer however and will try this tonight. The board and CPU are both the same age, everything else has been replaced in the last year. I planned on replacing them in the near future anyway and will consider moving that up, dependant upon tonights results. Thanks again, you've been an asset.

Collapse -
Answer
Monitor slow?

In reply to: What could cause my CPU to be overworked

https://www.amazon.com/VE247H-1920x1080-DVI-D-Back-lit-Monitor/dp/B004EFUOY4

I noticed this;

Current Mode: 1920 x 1080 (32 bit) (60Hz)
Monitor Name: Generic PnP Monitor
Monitor Model: VE247
Monitor Id: ACI2493
Native Mode: 1920 x 1080(p) (60.000Hz)


You said you lowered the resolution, but that's the standard for that monitor. I've noticed gamers tend to use monitors with higher refresh rates than 60 too. I'm currently using almost the same setup of a 26" at same resolution and some videos that ran fine on my older 17" standard monitor at 75 Hz, sometimes will do as you noticed. The only difference for me is monitor size and resolution.

Since I use Linux for my system, with an older stable kernel, I used RANDR and CVT commands to create a "newmode" for my video and added it, 1600 x 900 and not had the problem since.

Your video card seems quite capable, so my advice would be to try another, faster monitor, preferably if you have a friend who will let you test your system on his faster monitor. More pixel rendering means more time required and I think these cheaper TV and monitors are barely able to render well at their rated resolutions.

So, if you have a 1600 x 800 resolution available, give it a try and see if there's any change in the game play speed and rendering to monitor, other than of course the resolution.
Collapse -
Notice the difference?

In reply to: Monitor slow?

between your monitor and this gaming monitor? Check the specs, especially the refresh rate.

Find out the max refresh rate you can run on your monitor at the desired resolution and use that. If the resolution is lowered, the refresh rate can usually be raised some. Obviously 60Hz isn't doing it for you at the 1920 x 1080 resolution.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/asus-23-6-lcd-monitor-black/1965077.p?id=1218303010483&skuId=1965077

https://www.asus.com/us/Monitors/VE247H/specifications/

This indicates you can run a refresh rate of 76 Hz at that resolution of 1920 x 1080. It may be capable of higher refresh rate at lower resolution, but didn't find anything on it's max refresh ability.

Screen Refresh Rate
This refers to how many times per second a TV screen image is completely reconstructed. A TV with a 60Hz refresh rate means that the picture will be completely rebuilt 60 times in one second. Why is this important? Generally, the more the screen is refreshed, the smoother the images will appear.

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