Computer Newbies forum

General discussion

What about those accelators?

by grandpaw7 / August 23, 2004 3:26 AM PDT

I've seen comments in the past that they provide quite limited benefit to speed. If that was the case, is it still? I'm trying out Netzero and PeoplePC and right now have opted for the accelerator in both, but I am wondering if I would be better of using the five bucks a month to buy a better grade of whiskey. grandpaw

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: What about those accelators?
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: What about those accelators?
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Re: What about those accelerators?
by Coryphaeus / August 23, 2004 4:09 AM PDT

If you're talking about dial-up, don't waste your money. All they do is build a bigger cache on your hard drive so previously visited pages load faster. They cannot change the physics of the telephone cable pair. See my page here for plain English information http://www.wayne.hardy.com/

Cable and DSL are a little different although they are analog signals just like dial-up. Some of the "Tweakers" may help, but I've seen no improvement. You can visit here http://www.broadbandreports.com/ for speed tests and a downloadable tweaker. Back up your registry before running the program.

Good luck,

Telephony facts, analog/digital explained.
See the CNet faces behind the posts.


I think computer viruses should count as life. I think it says something about human nature that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. We've created life in our own image. - - Stephen W. Hawking

Collapse -
Re: What about those accelators?
by Cursorcowboy / August 23, 2004 8:14 AM PDT
I am wondering if I would be better of using the five bucks a month to buy a better grade of whiskey.

Assuredly. 'u cannot change reality but you can make someone belive so even if it isn't fact, because looks are deceiving. Significance would be multiplely compaired test under very similar conditions.
Collapse -
Sorry to disagree...
by radean / August 23, 2004 9:47 AM PDT

with the gurus, but a web accelerator CAN speed up a DUN.
My ISP offered one a while back, and I downloaded it, but didn't install it for a while, as I had heard nothing but bad things about this type thing.
But finally tried it, and it DOES speed things up.
Mine compresses images, and serves them to me as .png, instead of .gif, or other. For instance, the C/net Help.com header is 13K normally, but only 2 K using the accelerator. Most other images read 1K. Claims to compress text also, but don't know how to verify that.

Now I like this thing, but take note that at times, the "accelerator" server may be very busy, and your speed-up may turn into a slowdown. I just turn
it off when I think this is happening.

Bless my ISP, as they started providing this about a year ago, at no extra cost.
If I had NetZero, not sure I would pay extra for it. would have gone for the whiskey Happy

Collapse -
Re: Sorry to disagree...
by Cursorcowboy / August 23, 2004 10:45 PM PDT
In reply to: Sorry to disagree...
Mine compresses images, and serves them to me as .png, instead of .gif, or other. For instance, the C/net Help.com header is 13K normally, but only 2 K using the accelerator. Most other images read 1K. Claims to compress text also, but don't know how to verify that.

Not to argue the point but an observation of the statement, those graphics are converted somewhere before received by a user and will not happen without time loss somewhere for somebody. If I assume a process -- a user must make a request (point A) and get something (point B), where did we start the benchmark for determing time spent or loss?

"PNG's" two-dimensional interlacing scheme is more complex to implement than GIF's line-wise interlacing. It also costs a little more in file size. However, it yields an initial image eight times faster than GIF (the first pass transmits only 1/64th of the pixels, compared to 1/8th for GIF). Although this initial image is coarse, it is useful in many situations. For example, if the image is a World Wide Web imagemap that the user has seen before, PNG's first pass is often enough to determine where to click. The PNG scheme also looks better than GIF's, because horizontal and vertical resolution never differ by more than a factor of two; this avoids the odd "stretched" look seen when interlaced GIFs are filled in by replicating scanlines. Preliminary results show that small text in an interlaced PNG image is typically readable about twice as fast as in an equivalent GIF, i.e., after PNG's fifth pass or 25% of the image data, instead of after GIF's third pass or 50%. This is again due to PNG's more balanced increase in resolution.
Collapse -
Re: What about those accelators?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / August 24, 2004 12:46 AM PDT

I noted that "web pages" may load faster since they can degrade the pictures and the transfer will take less time. But downloads of .ZIP files will take just as long... The payback is iffy from what I've seen.

Nice idea and great way to boost ISP incomes.

Bob

Collapse -
The whiskey wins my vote
by grandpaw7 / August 24, 2004 5:24 AM PDT

grandpaw

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

CNET FORUMS TOP DISCUSSION

Help, my PC with Windows 10 won't shut down properly

Since upgrading to Windows 10 my computer won't shut down properly. I use the menu button shutdown and the screen goes blank, but the system does not fully shut down. The only way to get it to shut down is to hold the physical power button down till it shuts down. Any suggestions?