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What about the animals?

Most have probably heard by now, despite the thousands of human lives lost to the tsunami last week, no animal carcasses have been found. Yala National Park in Sri Lanka, one of the hardest hit countries, is home to elephants, deer, jackals and crocodiles yet none of them died.

Many claim a sixth sense helped the animals. Others say the animals heard it coming. One way or the other it seems the animals had an advantage over the humans.

Is this the result of evolution? Did humans once have the same sixth sense and they lost it as they evolved?

Is it the result of intelligent design? Did some creator just decide it was a feature humans wouldn't need so it just got left out of our blueprint?

Maybe the animals of past generations taught their young and it has been passed down from one generation to another. Elephants are suspected to pass on the locations of distant waterholes in this manner so maybe they taught their young to run for high ground if there's an earthquake. Can animals pass on knowledge from one generation to the next?

What do you think?

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i have no clue

In reply to: What about the animals?

but i have a hunch that the animals new or had the sixth sence.

of doom,

its gonna be yrs before those people get back on there feet if ever Sad

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We don't give our little buddies enough credit,Bro..........

In reply to: i have no clue

Indeed,the animals do have a 6th sense.

Your Oreo and my Jones can sense the magnetic field of a running refridgerator motor,they can walk into an empty room and can sense who the last human was that was in that room! The animals there knew what was going down and they split before the sh*t hit the fan.

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Some thoughts

In reply to: What about the animals?

I can think of some reasons. One is that animals tend to be "skittish" and if they smell or hear anything out of the ordinary will move away from the source of the perceived danger. Moving to higher ground might be instinctive. No sixth sense required. Humans have a tendency to gawk and point and miss such cues. Elephants especially can hear very low frequencies. It's been hypothesized that that is how they communicate. Maybe they heard the waves coming or even the original earthquake itself.

Also, I don't think we can really trust preliminary impressions like this. Too early to tell what all went on. Maybe there's a big old pile of dead elephants somewhere that no one has yet seen. I know animals have been devastated in river floods in Africa for instance.

And lastly, didn't most of the human deaths occurred right on the beach or near the waterfront? I have rarely seen animals of any kind other than birds or seals hanging around beaches. Water flooding two miles inland may not be enough to affect animals. Were humans two miles inland killed?

BTW I think I heard something on the news this morning about lots of dead dogs and cats being found. Anyone confirm?

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I have heard...

In reply to: What about the animals?

that most animals can sense a storm or earthquake coming in advance, so I wouldn't be surprised that the animals knew what was coming.
Glenda

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That sixth sense of theirs can't be too good.

In reply to: I have heard...

I saw something the other night on National Geographic about wildebeests (I think they were) at a watering hole being attacked and eaten by crocs. You could actually see the crocs as they approached (and hear the ominous music) ready to lunge and bite. Yet the wildebeests just stood there and drank. When one would get killed they'd all move back a couple feet, and a few moments later get their muzzles back into the watering hole for the next croc to attack.

"Oh well", they thought, "better him than me. At least there's no tsunamis about!"

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Hard to say

In reply to: What about the animals?

When my dog gets under a specific table, I know there is an approaching storm, long before the thunder begins. I think that "experts" say dogs react to low pressure systems. I know that mine never fails.

There have been tales of domestic pets that appear to sense in some way earthquakes before they hit.

As for as wild animals , it could be possible that there is an inborn warning system. Fowl know when to migrate, and the routes to take. I've heard it could be magnetic fields that guide them. (I'm amazed how ducks and geese take turns flying the point!) Salmon fight upstream to spawn where they were born. Turkeys are supposed to be very dumb as they panic easily. Yet my grandfather had one that followed him around, pecked on his window at the correct hour each morning to awaken him, and was happy to sit with him in the yard. We had a family of cardinals that would stand and call at our back door if the feeder was empty. Birds post a "lookout" while others are at the birdbath or feeder to watch for danger.

One of our huskies was what I call a "nurse dog". In the waiting room at the vet's office she would go to frightened, shaking dogs, and somehow calm them. Our dachshund would stay with an ill family member. When I was a child our German Shepherd would pull me back by my skirt if I got close to the street. (I know they are herders by nature.)

Anybody who has squirrels in their yard knows that they are champs at problem solving.

So what is learned by repetition like Pavlov's dog, what are specific built-in defense mechanisms, what is an urge we can't explain (like the salmon), what is a sixth sense, what is pure instinct, I don't know. The fact that this was the first such event for at least 100 years makes it even more puzzling. I would not dismiss out of hand the idea that elephants could "pass on" important info to their young

Just a guess, but maybe the different animals in the tsunami areas each had their own warning system. All animals seem to, including man though he doesn't always react to them.

Angeline


click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

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I think the Intelligent Designer wanted humans to be curious

In reply to: Hard to say

and stand firm in the face of danger. The designer didn't want humans to run away at the first hint of danger. That is how the earth got explored, and that is how many good things in our lives were developed.

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(NT) (NT) Oops! Response meant for Clay.

In reply to: I think the Intelligent Designer wanted humans to be curious

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I believe animals do have a sixth sense

In reply to: What about the animals?

Watch them someday. When a storm is predicted or approaching everything goes dead quiet. No animals or birds around. Seagulls will come far inland. When I see seagulls swarming around here and no animals, I know somethings coming.

Heres another link to that Sri Lanka observation.

http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/4031907/detail.html

George

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People with the ability back in the 17th century

In reply to: What about the animals?

in England, were accused of being witches when they showed this ability, and they were all executed.
Little wonder that not too many people have the gift today.

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21st Century People

In reply to: People with the ability back in the 17th century

Not so quick, some people thinks the following I listed are witches but with different names like...


1-800-dialpsychic hotline (the last time I asked who will be the next president -- a computer voice said, "too early to tell" <chuckles>)

1-800-astrologytoday hotline (zodiacs, planets, stars, animal depiction (used in Chinese astrology)

1-800-hollisticmedicine hotline (discredited by many medical association --- hmmmm just because they do not use the fancy lab equiptments lol)

1-800-homeopathy hotline (discredited the same --- too much neat aroma theraphy -- if you are allergic to some smell - don't try this. You may end up aggravating your sinus problem)

1-800-quackdoctors hotline (EVER seen people get their gallbladder stones taken out using their hands cutting into your tummy?)

1-800-santaria hotline (they'll make you drink blood and behead those chickens - watch out for PETA)

1-800-vodoo hotline (ahhhh the pins and needles, you can find the gadgets in your grandma's sewing box)

1-800-wiccahotline (don't mess with mother nature - they do not appreciate that)

1-800-spiritualist hotline (talking to dead? hmmmm zombies?)

1-800-dial madam crystal ball hotline (they offer those nice home baked brownies first and asked you to wait for 5 minutes before looking into the crystal ball - guess what happens?)

1-800-move the darn ouija board hotline (just push it to where you want it to go. lol)

1-800-dial Anton Szandor LaVey (SEEN some of their members? Can't tell whether they are ancient monks of the medieval renaissance ages similar to what the guys wear in the Vatican City)

1-800-tarot card readers hotline (blackjack or poker? take a pick)

1-800-palm reader (I think, I'd rather use palm pilot(blackberry)


cl

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Have witnessed actual fact that a dog can

In reply to: What about the animals?

tell when an earthquake is approaching.
Our family was in a large earthquake overseas in the 60's. Wife and I were at work and kids in school. We all united at home where the roof shingles had shaken off, walls cracked and stripped of stucco, water pipes broken, all furniture turned over including the washer & fridge, sidewalks & streets buckled up, no water or heat. Wide trenches that had to be skirted, etc.
After the 1st earthquake shock, many aftershocks followed, a few almost as bad as the original. We caught on very early that our dog would run to the front door and bark fanatically wanting to get out at least 45 to 60 seconds before a earthquake shock would hit. We took our sleeping mattresses to the living room near the front door and all night long at least 6 times the dog would bark, we ran outside, and the aftershock earthquake would hit.

JR
PS..the International Red Cross came fast, fed us and the civilians. Military furnished water/food/shelter to all who needed, military & local indigenous civilians.

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Animals do sense things....

In reply to: What about the animals?

I believe most animals have a sense concerning earthquakes and a Tsunami, but wild elephants, deer, etc. would not necessarily be close to the ocean, and those that happen to be would sense and seek higher ground. I was in Hawaii, but not the big island of Hawaii where Hilo was hit in May 1960 with a 35 foot Tsunami wiping out the downtown section close to the beach and killing 61 people. The wild animals were in higher grounds and not affected. Flew over Hilo some days later and the devastation was apparent up to the base of the high ground. When Hilo rebuilt they made a park of the previous downtown and moved further inland of the cove.

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Basic Instincts

In reply to: What about the animals?

?not the movie by Michael Douglas and Sharon Stone, well hmmm that too perhaps on the chemistry of burning desires (another subject).

?back to instinct --- apparent in both man and animals --- this basic fact.

?inferring ideational and volitional process (man uses the faculty of the mind (reasoning) while animals exhibit an enigmatic impulse (special forms of impulsive action and reflexes), agree?

? Natural selections and natural influences

?adaptability

?survival

? According to James Dennison?s thread in his notion, ?Wrath of god and his exploitation of religious political conflicts? ---the first is none factual the second is a poor argument to the event, I say, this is nothing more than man?s lack of preparation (protocols and procedures to respond to Emergency Crisis).

In spite of all the technological gadgets to warn us how to beat these natural catastrophic causes, man (intelligence) still has a long ways to go.

If the biblical story of the Noah Ark is to repeat --- perhaps this time, it will be the animals all aboard. Now that is some wrath eh.

Somebody ought to fix those plates quickie because the idea of the domino effect is far scary (inescapable).


cl

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Hmmm, looks like humans should use animals as an early

In reply to: What about the animals?

warning system for earthquakes, tsunamis, etc.

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Not necessarily a sixth sense, Clay

In reply to: What about the animals?

Many animals have much more sensitive hearing that humans -- they may very well have heard it coming.

Happy New Year! -- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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True, but ...

In reply to: Not necessarily a sixth sense, Clay

... how did they know what the sound was?

Evie Happy

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Do'nt need to know

In reply to: True, but ...

Unlike humans they run from unfamilar noises not toward it.

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Makes sense ...

In reply to: Do'nt need to know

... but from that distance it seems like the direction of the source would be more "backgound" and less precise. I know when a noisy plane passes overhead, you generally can't tell which direction it is coming from.

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Interesting...

In reply to: Do'nt need to know

Unlike humans they run from unfamilar noises not toward it.
Posted by: Hounddog


Sounds logical Hounddog. But I think the key word here is "familiarity and unfamiliarity of sounds" in which case such senses are present in man and animals (uniquely in different ways of course).

Man and animals run away when they hear gun shots. (familiar to man and whether this sound is familiar or unfamiliar to some animals - their defense mechanism kicks in immediately but man may decide to stay and be nosy about what was going on.)

Also, I think people living in the urban or suburban are far too disensitized by surrounding sound or noise that it creates this filtering mechanism to shut off this senses.

Just look at the how many electronic stuff running in our home (ticking of the clock, refrigerator sound, my external drive sound, radio, fan, airconditioner etc) almost appear as if it does not exist of course apart from all the outside noises we are so used to. Most people around here wear headphones (listening to whatever)

Now let us compare people (natives living in the remotest area) living far away from all the high tech stuff. They can sense pretty much when it is going to rain, which direction the wind is going to blow and many other amazing neat sensing capabilities. When they seem to know that there is danger ahead -- they quickly prepare. Everything done so primitively to defend themselves from natural catastrophe.


Did we just killed our certain senses?


.
cl

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The point of the post

In reply to: What about the animals?

was to ask what happened to this sixth sense in humans? Neanderthal man likely had some remnant but our current state seems to be without. Is it the result of evolution that we lost some trait we no longer needed? Was it designed out of us from the get go by intelligent design? Is it perhaps a trait that man or his ancestors never had? what do you think?

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I think we had it at one point

In reply to: The point of the post

I believe our human ancestors had many of the traits that we refer to as "instincts" in animals. As our world began to change and fewer of these "instincts" were necessary for survival, we began to need them and use them less and less.

Simple example: I don't need to learn to read the "signs" of what the coming days' weather is - our satellites give a pretty good indication for our meterologists to predict such. (Probably not a very good example as they seem to get it wrong quite often!! LOL)

I also believe that many of these "instincts" are still buried within us, and that is why there are a few who are able to utilize other senses that most of us consider "strange."

.

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I'm not sure we ever had it ...

In reply to: The point of the post

... just as we never had some sensory connection to the Earth's magnetic field for migration.

Evie Happy

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My 7th sense tells me...

In reply to: The point of the post

it all depends on who is definiing the 6th sense?

-Religious point of view

-An atheist point of view

-Philosophical point of view

-The magicians, witches and socerers that resides in those 1-800 #

-Believers of Elements (Air, Earth, Fire and H2O) and numerous pagans of all types.

-Psychologist point of view

-Paranormal dudes

or

-from an artists point of view (writers, poet, IN THE MOVIES people etc.)


My 7th sense tells me what they all have to say sounds fascinating.


cl

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from my point of view

In reply to: My 7th sense tells me...

Hi

from my point of view, every body is selfish and they do everything to be able to survive

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The point of the post

In reply to: The point of the post

I think Marcia makes a good point ? Use it or lose it.

Certain mathematical computations that once cooked inside my head and sought escape now lie hidden somewhere else and certainly not at the tip of my tongue. The use of my calculator has quenched many of those flames. If humans ever had the ability to sense such things it was replaced with something better suited for the long run. Who knows? Happy

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Perhaps

In reply to: The point of the post

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"Can animals pass on knowledge from one generation to...

In reply to: What about the animals?

the next?"

That is how they usually learn what is safe to eat, or what other animals will prey upon them (and why many animals born/raised in captivity don't make it on their own.) And one reason we are not supposed to "feed the bears".

If we would research how they live, servive, and socialize as much as we research products, drugs and desease on them we would probably learn alot more than we do.

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One orphaned hippo in Mombasa Kenya...

In reply to: What about the animals?

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