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We're talking angry!

by xerpor / June 5, 2004 2:05 AM PDT

Armed Man in Bulldozer Goes on Rampage

GRANBY, Colo. (AP) - A man who lost two bitter battles with town officials plowed an armor-plated bulldozer into the town hall, a former mayor's home and at least five other buildings before the machine ground to a halt in the wreckage of a warehouse, authorities said.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,1280,-4170582,00.html

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Re: Now, that's what I call A Colorado Rocky Mountain High...nt
by Mary Kay / June 5, 2004 2:56 AM PDT
In reply to: We're talking angry!

.

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That's what I call justice!
by James Denison / June 5, 2004 6:13 AM PDT
In reply to: We're talking angry!

Zoning laws are probably the most onerous to property owners everywhere. They affect us the most. Zoning violations, permit requirements for the smallest changes in some places, money under the table to officials that start off poor and leave office rich, ad nauseum.....

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Re: That's what I call justice!
by Dave Konkel [Moderator] / June 5, 2004 1:38 PM PDT

Hi, James.

Yes, there can be abuses of zonng laws. OTOH, Houston doesn't have any. When we first moved here, I was shocked at a jury case. In a pricey Houston neighborhood, someone who was moving planned to sell a house with a large parcel of land to a convenience store chain, who were planning to demolish the house and build a 7-11 equivalent (I don't recall which company it was). Unfortunately, this neighborhood did not have deed restrictions on commercial use. So the homeowners banded together and raised enough cash to offer ? again as much to the homeowner (the sale had not yet closed, and no contract had been signed -- it was oral). The convenience store sued in Harris County Court and (in A JURY decision! was awarded five years projected profits as "damages" -- almost $300k, AIR (this was in the early 80's, so that's about a million in today's money). No concern at all for the damages caused by having a convenience store in the middle of a residential neighborhood, and the inevitable fall in property values, to say nothing of possible injury to neighborhood children...

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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A convenience store is the new form of neighborhood grocer.
by James Denison / June 5, 2004 3:15 PM PDT

Usually the houses immediately next to it drop in value, but the others often hold the value. It's when other business combine with those stores, congregate in the same area that it hurts home values, but at the same time the neighboring properties increase their commercial value potential. About half mile up from me is a convenience store all by itself, no other business. It hasn't affected the area's property values there. To the south there is a local owned convenience store next to a service station that's been there probably since the 40's. There is a package store next to it. Only those three places and the rest is homes for a circle mile around them, except for an elementary school nearby. I do think it affected the property nearest to the stores on that side of the street, but the result was existing homes which were old were removed and duplexes were built that didn't drag down the single detached homes located there. We stop by there several times a week for our milk. I think it depends on how the business is setup and run, how clean the place is kept, and not allowing loitering to occur.

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Anger run amuk.
by Kiddpeat / June 5, 2004 6:38 AM PDT
In reply to: We're talking angry!

What a silly thing to die for. A zoning dispute!

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Re:Wow, Brings to mind, that Rambo Movie, First blood (nt)
by Rolway / June 5, 2004 7:05 AM PDT
In reply to: Anger run amuk.

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Freedom. The right to own one's property in more than name only. What a silly thing to die for.
by James Denison / June 5, 2004 3:36 PM PDT
In reply to: Anger run amuk.

Some places the zoning laws are so restrictive and their penchant for daily compounding fines so dastardly, it's like being in a communist state where the only difference is you get to claim ownership on a paper, but in actuality every thing you do on the property requires this or that permit, even to the removal of a tree or someplaces a shrub. Since busy bodies or anyone with some excuse to bother you can call and complain anonymously and have the zoning dept on your back, it becomes a tool of harrassment for those who use it in that manner. Often it's used to try and move a person off a piece of property that someone else wants. For instance if a developer wants some property close to water or a good view to put in a condo or apartments, if he can create a hardship through the zoning department on the person living there, he hopes to be able to force them through fines to get feel compelled to sell it to get out from under the legal requirements of the zoning dept. The guy at the zoning department gets his payoff secretly from the developer, the property owner sells just to not be harassed any longer, especially if he can't do what the zoning department wants, such as painting or making some repairs they say is mandatory. So who should have had the greater rights? The owner of course, but instead the ones that have the power over his rights are the zoning department and through them the developer. The zoning officer makes out and the developer gets what he wants. Yes, it can end up in a court, but that's usually after a mandatory arbitration process with the zoning department in which the whole purpose of it is to build a case against the property owner, not really to be of any advantage to the property owner. It's a nasty corrupt situation in many places, it overrides property owners rights, it makes property owners no better than serfs to the zoning departments whims. One of the worst places I ever lived for that type of stuff was Tampa, and my one regret in regards to this story is that it didn't happen there.

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