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Watch for the coming flood of global warming litigation

by caktus / July 31, 2007 7:02 AM PDT
Washington, D.C. (Map, News) -
Watch for the coming flood of global warming litigation

Let's assume, for the sake of argument, that the climate change phenomenon commonly called "global warming" exists and is being caused, at least in part, by human activity. Who is responsible? The only sensible answer is, everybody. We all contribute to the release of greenhouse gasses, as did our ancestors going back at least to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.

One would therefore think litigation is no more an appropriate response to global warming than litigation would be to any so-called "act of god." One would be wrong.

Earlier this year, Texas trial lawyer Stephen Susman told the Dallas Morning News that "You're going to see some really serious exposure on the part of companies that are emitting CO2." He added, for good measure, that "I can't say for sure it's going to be as big as the tobacco settlements, but then again it may even be bigger."

Indeed, trial lawyers are gearing up to turn global warming into their next pot of gold. A coalition of environmental groups and cities are suing the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the Export-Import Bank of the United States for making loans to finance oil pipelines, oil drilling, and similar projects that supposedly result in a net emission of billions of tons of carbon dioxide. After Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans trial lawyers Gerald Mapes and Timothy Porter sued dozens of energy companies, claiming they had contributed to global warming.

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Last year, Business Week reported that there were 16 pending global warming cases of these sorts pending around the country. More are surely in the pipeline, so to speak.

Indeed, the prospect of a boom in global warming litigation is prompting law firms to begin setting up units specializing in climate change issues. According to the Dallas Morning News, for example, Dallas law firms Vinson & Elkins and Thompson & Knight have set up global warming units with 41 and 26 lawyers, respectively.

If it weren't for the precedents set by tobacco, alcohol, and obesity lawsuits, one might be tempted to dismiss climate change litigation out of hand. After all, the law typically requires a showing of causation. Before you can hold me liable, you must show that but for my conduct you would not have been injured. Typically, you also must show that my conduct was the proximate cause of your injury.

How can one firm?or even one industry?be blamed for a global phenomenon that took decades to arise? Making causality findings and apportioning responsibility in this context is ludicrous. Yet, what might a New Orleans jury still smarting over Katrina do if they got the chance to decide Mapes and Porter's suit?

This is a classic example of why tort reform is a pressing need. The Institute for Legal Reform offers some chilling statistics: "America's civil justice system is the world's most expensive, with a direct cost in 2005 of $261 billion, or 2.09 percent of GDP.

"Tort costs were $880 per U.S. citizen in 2005, meaning the average American family of four paid a 'litigation tax' of more than $3,500 due to increased costs from lawsuits and other liability expenses that force businesses to raise the price of products and services. That cost is equivalent to nearly an 8 percent tax on wages."

These costs are having a dramatic impact on the US economy. A nonpartisan report prepared for New York Senator Charles Schumer and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, found that the "propensity toward litigation" in the United States is "driving growing international concerns about participating in US financial markets."

Along with regulatory excesses like the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the litigation industry in this country is making our capital markets and our economy as a whole less competitive.

It's time for Congress and the president to step up with legislation that take the question of global warming out of the arena of ad hoc judicial decision making and put it into the hands of our elected officials. Both fairness and efficiency demand it.

http://www.examiner.com/a-855349%7EWatch_for_the_coming_flood_of_global_warming_litigation.html

I wonder how many bottom feeders will clinb aboard [this] gravy train.
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A sensible and honest trial lawyer
by Steven Haninger / July 31, 2007 7:50 AM PDT

is probably dirt poor and lonely...if such even exits.

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Flood?! Global?!
by drpruner / July 31, 2007 9:27 AM PDT
We're all gonna die !!

Oh ... wait ... No, we won't:
Gen 9:12-16
Rev 11:18
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(NT) The great american tradition. Whenever you can... sue. :-(
by grimgraphix / July 31, 2007 3:44 PM PDT
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Just be sure to pay your insurance premiums promptly because

there's someone out there needing that money to pay for their haircut. Wink

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New crisis...
by J. Vega / August 1, 2007 2:54 AM PDT

There is a new crisis just brought to light:
A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine says having overweight friends provides a possible explanation for the rapid increase in obesity over the last few decades.
The condition appears to spread though what researchers are calling "social contagion," a tendency of people who become obese to influence the behavior of others and to convey -- perhaps subliminally -- the message that being overweight is OK.
The researchers found that an individual's chances of becoming obese increased by 57 percent if a friend grew obese. Within the closest friendships, the increased risk was 171 percent.
Obviously, there is a problem with "second hand fat". call the lawyers. We need special "fat sections" in restaurants to protect us from the danger of second hand fat.

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