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Vitamin D may ease depression.

by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / August 15, 2004 1:25 AM PDT

It has been noted that quite a few members at SE according to their own testimony are suffering from some type of depression.

Here's an article that may help you.

Vitamin D may ease depression.

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Other than Vit. D and prescription medication, does it work? What other therapeutic methods do you find helpful?

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(NT) (NT) Wrong!
by Glenda / August 15, 2004 1:33 AM PDT
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Depressed? Consider Fish Oil too.
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / August 15, 2004 2:48 AM PDT
But depression isn't the only disease that may be affected by a person's levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Researchers have found that those who have been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease and other conditions associated with depression, have low levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood.
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A MANIC DEPRESSION PRIMER by by Dimitri Mihalas

The bipolar (also called the manic-depressive) illness, caused by as yet unknown imbalances of neurotransmitters in the brain, is known to wreak havoc with countless lives in the U.S. and all over the world.
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Clinical Symptoms of Manic Depression (Bipolar Disorder)

This section describes the clinical symptoms of Manic Depression or Bipolar Disorder, employed by Psychiatrist and other mental health professionals as diagnostic criteria.
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An interesting read. If you know of anyone, neighbors or co-workers who are suffering from this disorder or families having difficulties dealing with a family member who has this type of problem have no access to internet information --- may be it's not a bad idea to print this information out for them.
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Your a Doctor now , Too?
by Glenda / August 15, 2004 2:54 AM PDT

Sorry but if depressed people take the meds they don't continue to have big problems;)

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Accdg. to Dr. Deborah Spitz
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / August 15, 2004 3:18 AM PDT

calls psychotherapy "a necessary invaluable adjunctive treatment and notes that medication alone cannot help clients to accept the disorder or learn preventive and coping strategies.
http://counsellingresource.com/distress/mood-disorders/manic-depression-symptoms.html#BipolarI_depressed
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Further she quoted...
Spitz, D. (2003) 'What Is the Role of Psychotherapy in Bipolar Disorder? -- Part I', Medscape Psychiatry & Mental Health 8(2).

The author argues that for a particular subset of clients experiencing symptoms of manic depression, psychotherapy is a necessary and valuable component of treatment. She suggests that medication -- which she calls "the bedrock of treatment" for bipolar disorder -- cannot by itself foster acceptance of a chronic illness or teach preventive strategies.

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Has anybody seen a Manic Depressive person explode in their episode attack? What's it like?

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Re: Accdg. to Dr. Deborah Spitz
by Glenda / August 15, 2004 3:22 AM PDT

You seem to equate Clinical depression with BiPolar, Not the same at all! BTW why so curious???
Glenda

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You are falling into DK's trap
by Evie / August 15, 2004 3:25 AM PDT

Depression and Bipolar disorders are not the same. The more common previous designation of manic-depressive can lead to the confusion.

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That's not the point
by Evie / August 15, 2004 4:20 AM PDT

His postings on depression and bipolar disorders belie a general lack of understanding of the subject matter. One which you are repeating.

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Speaking of Depression and Vitamin D
by Evie / August 15, 2004 5:51 AM PDT
In reply to: That's not the point

What's with the Brits and Prozac?

Prozac 'found in drinking water'

An Environment Agency report suggests so many people are taking the drug nowadays it is building up in rivers and groundwater....

...In the decade leading up to 2001, the number of prescriptions for antidepressants went up from nine million per year to 24 million per year, says the paper....


Evie Happy

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(NT) (NT) ^^^ How did this end up here? Was reply to Mo
by Evie / August 15, 2004 5:59 AM PDT
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For the record ...
by Mosonnow / August 15, 2004 3:24 AM PDT
Vitamin D
There is very little vitamin D in most people's diets, unless fatty fish, eggs, liver or vitamin D fortified foods (such as margarine) are eaten. Fortified cow's milk is the most common source of vitamin D in some countries. Vitamin D deficiency in vegans can be avoided by consuming fortified soymilk and cereals. The sun is also a major source of vitamin D, so dietary intake is only important when exposure to UV light from the sun is inadequate - for example, in the house-bound elderly.


Then again, why would anyone in SE be depressed? After all, what with.... and with.... and with... and a seat by their computer in the sun...

Regards
Mo
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Re: Vitamin D may ease depression.
by MarciaB / August 15, 2004 4:18 AM PDT

Discussion of such a wide-spread problem is, I believe, a good thing. There are MANY resources available for depression and bi-polar disorders, as well as all other mental and physical problems.

THE IMPORTANT THING is to make very sure that the resources you refer to are well known and safe. It can be a devastating outcome, even fatal, to do otherwise.

I also believe, IMHO, that the issue of mental disorders, in particular depression, was brought to our attention in this thread in order for C-L to start an argument with a member who has admitted to living with depression (and I commend that member for being honest about such. Unfortunately such honesty may now bring you unwarranted attacks). I am sure this will be denied as a reason for the original post; but as I said, it is only my opinion.

Here is a good start for getting updated and well-researched information on Depression and Bi-Polar disorders:

Depression and Bi-Polar Support Alliance:
http://www.dbsalliance.org/

In particular, please refer to this section:
http://www.dbsalliance.org/info/depression.html

From this site:
"How does depression differ from bipolar disorder?
Bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, is a treatable medical illness where a person?s mood alternates between the "poles" of depression and mania, a heightened energetic state.
"Herbal or Natural Treatments
Dietary supplements and other alternative treatments that are advertised to have a positive effect on depression regularly enter the marketplace. These alternative treatments include Omega-3, St. John?s wort, SAM-e and others. DBSA does not endorse or discourage the use of these treatments. However, remember that natural is not always synonymous with safe. Different brands of supplements may contain different concentrations of the active substance when processed in different ways and these alternative treatments may have side effects, so read labels carefully and discuss them with your doctor or pharmacist.
"Recent studies have suggested that herbal treatments, such as St. John?s wort, may interfere with the beneficial effects of some medications. Be sure you tell your doctor about all of the medications or herbal remedies you are taking."

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Thank you Marcia.......
by Glenda / August 15, 2004 4:34 AM PDT
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Re: Vitamin D may ease depression.
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / August 15, 2004 4:43 AM PDT
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Re: Vitamin D may ease depression.
by MarciaB / August 15, 2004 5:15 AM PDT

Yes, it is good information. I am glad you appreciated it.

Now, please, be nicer and quit making back-handed jabs at folks that you know, because of their honesty, to be dealing with these disorders. It is not anything to make fun of, no matter how much you may dislike a person.

--Marcia

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I agree ...
by Evie / August 15, 2004 5:41 AM PDT

... and if people have genuine interest in understanding such disorders it is far more polite to ask than to attack. I may get snippy on this topic because of what appears to be a high degree of misunderstanding regarding the differences between depression and manic depression. While I'm not a big fan of semantics in labels, renaming manic depression as bipolar disorder is a good step in preventing confusion. Someone very close to me was bipolar for decades. Psychotherapy is basically useless for a chemical imbalance. Counseling can help in recognizing early signs of a "high" phase coming on and in acceptance of the disease and importance of adhering to one's medicines.

While I do believe we are an overmedicated nation, and too frequently nutritional approaches are ignored or overlooked, for those with a chemical imbalance today's medicines can be a Godsend. To imply that those who take them are using the easy way out, avoiding confronting their "real problems" or somesuch is unfair at the least.

Evie Happy
Sun "worshiper" Vitamin D and Omega 3 Addict

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Re: Vitamin D may ease depression.
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / August 15, 2004 5:45 AM PDT

Now, please, be nicer and quit making back-handed jabs at folks that you know, because of their honesty, to be dealing with these disorders. It is not anything to make fun of, no matter how much you may dislike a person.

--Marcia

Posted by: Marcia Butler Posted on: 08/15/2004 12:15 PM
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Please refer to the current layout of this thread without this new postings of mine.

***Please note whose making a "GARBAGE" out of the post I started?
Please review all Subjects and contents and see for yourself whose making an insult?

***I asked you to refer to the original postings of this thread, does it indicate that I am making fun of anyone or offer alternative to help?
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Take A hard look at what you are accusing me here. Accusation and Opinions are two different thing. On the brighter side of your response, I will assume you are forming an opinion and not accusation. Leave it at that for Peace sake.

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Re: Vitamin D may ease depression.
by Glenda / August 15, 2004 5:54 AM PDT

BS answer! Refer back to the stable remark you made ealier!

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PS
by Glenda / August 15, 2004 6:03 AM PDT

You revealed your intention with the nasty remarks that followed. If I needed advice with these issues I would discuss all options with my doctors, not seek counsel from someone that has presented no qualifications on the matter under an anonymous name in a discussion forum known as Speakeasy!
Glenda

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Re: Vitamin D may ease depression.
by RB2D2 / August 15, 2004 6:35 AM PDT

Hi Marcia. I really don't think C L meant to be anything but helpful with her Vitamin D post. It is rather new findings that are being reported on more and more. But what really got my attention was the almost rabid attack because she mentioned "depression"/ bipolar. Yet a while back when DE ( a MOD!) was openly and aggressively making fun of MPDs in SE everyone was patting HIM on the back and giving him high fives.

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