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versions of Linux Ubuntu, mint, xxx

I bought one of those 'it will boot dead computer' sticks fr Amazon, it sort of worked, then quit, (haven't gone back to play around with it) it was Linux mint. Now I am thinking of adding a partition of linux, or putting it on an SD card (preference) and 'playing' with it. not sure I can add an SSD (space) to machine.
There are several versions, diff names,... what is the benefit of each or a recommendation?
would like to boot my computer from SD rather than HD to speedit up? Aspire (Acer) all in one, 8g ram, ZC-700G. (slow) Celeron N3150 @1.60GHz. but all I could afford.

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Actually none.

The recommendation was without an explanation or reason why. So there is no benefit to be had.

That out of the way, I found booting from SD cards to be slower than HDD for many reasons. Such as the USB interface it's on as well as the SD card media speed is a fraction of the HDD speed.

Yes it is useful in some situations (which I won't get into) but you as the experimenter would try it out.

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(NT) my sd card is in an sd slot, my usb's are 3.0. boot/load tim
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Unsure what you meant here.

Try again.

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USB3

That's probably your best bet for booting to Linux without putting on a hard drive. Put it on a USB3 flash drive and boot from a USB3 port if you have that.

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