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Vegetarians only?

by C1ay / February 10, 2008 8:53 AM PST

Would it be OK for an employer to limit their staff to vegetarians only?

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I don't see reason why not
by Steven Haninger / February 10, 2008 9:23 AM PST
In reply to: Vegetarians only?

I don't see why an employer can't pick and choose who they hire for any reason desired but I also don't see reason why anyone else can't decide whether to do business with them or not. One who discriminates against others should be willing to accept response in kind.

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Then can you refuse to hire anyone
by Roger NC / February 10, 2008 10:51 AM PST

that doesn't eat meat?

That doesn't smoke?


Odd how things sound when you turn them a 180 degrees isn't it?


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It changes nothing
by Steven Haninger / February 10, 2008 8:06 PM PST

but business people understand the risks of limiting their employee and potential customer base. It's well known that the business ethic and personal ethic often collide.

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(NT) Paul McCartney did
by jonah jones / February 10, 2008 10:55 AM PST
In reply to: Vegetarians only?
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Good BusinessWeek story on this...
by shawnlin / February 10, 2008 12:21 PM PST
In reply to: Vegetarians only?

it may not be exactly related, but it's in the same ballpark.


basically, some companies are telling their employees to get healthy or they're fired. this is obviously to stave off health care costs, however it obviously has benefits to productivity...


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why not
by WOODS-HICK / February 10, 2008 10:38 PM PST
In reply to: Vegetarians only?

if the policy is in effect and potential hires are informed, it should not be an issue. nobody is forcing someone to apply.

there of examples of employers requiring no-smoking not only at the workplace but anywhere including the homes of their employees. that idea pushes an employer's control. what if they do not want you to ski or any other legal but potentially debilitating activity.

the example I am referring to has been discussed quite a while back in SE. one of the issues was they were firing long-time employees if they did not quit. they did offer to pay for any smoking cessation program.

you would expect your employer to also be a vegetarian if they require it of employees.

I do not believe this issue will affect the meat or fowl segment of employment opportunities.

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Can of worms
by Willy / February 11, 2008 2:10 AM PST
In reply to: Vegetarians only?

This opens a can of worms that can get out of hand. While, I believe certain criteria should be meant for some jobs, like a "handicap" person not be a fire fighter BUT can can be part of the fire dept.. Many people fought to have basic rights re-establish or affirmed so it would be open to a legal battle at least to affirm rights on other areas. I know many employers want to save on health costs, but really the question is "why health costs are so much" in the 1st place. I'm pretty sure that vegetarians die just like everyone else, so would a disclaimer be, no drinkers, bad drivers, spouse beaters, etc. even though they're vegetarians. Personally, it would make it hard to want to work for such a co., they'll pop-up other criteria somewhere down the employment line. -----Willy Happy

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(NT) Worms: Non-veggie, I believe.
by drpruner / February 16, 2008 4:29 AM PST
In reply to: Can of worms
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(NT) How about - No Diabetics Need Apply?
by C1ay / February 11, 2008 4:32 AM PST
In reply to: Vegetarians only?
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What Are the Federal Laws Prohibiting Job Discrimination?
by WOODS-HICK / February 11, 2008 6:37 AM PST
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I'll give a qualified "Yes"
by Steven Haninger / February 11, 2008 6:48 AM PST

I would have to presume there's a reason though it might not be considered as a good one. I would also presume this is a small business that doesn't contract with the government or anyone else that requires certain equal opportunity standards to get the job awarded. Perhaps this could be a small, local landscape business where the employer wants only people with no known health issues. I'd say he's ok to do so. Again, he may find he's limited himself to a small labor pool and a smaller number of potential customers by his own actions. It's his choice and his risk.

Now, tell us....Where are you going with this....really? Happy

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No particular direction
by C1ay / February 11, 2008 10:16 AM PST
Now, tell us....Where are you going with this....really?

The effect of employment screening based on the potential health insurance burden seems to be a growing issue gliding along several slippery slopes so it seemed to be a good topic for discussion.
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Yeap, and another target in the wings
by Roger NC / February 11, 2008 10:25 AM PST

is the overweight.

I'm not sure some of it isn't going to backfire since as a rule, as we age, we have more problems. And trying to eliminate everyone that has a health problem potentially in the future impacts much more than just diet habits.

Is it a good reason not to hire you because your father and grandfather had heart attacks? diabetes? cancer?

Major health problems are affected by hereditary dispositions as well as life styles, perhaps equally so.

Besides, is the majority of the medical community backing the idea that vegetarians are normally healthier? Maybe in cholesterol and high blood pressure, but isn't there often nutritional deficient problems with vegetarian diets?


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I would start writing your congressman
by WOODS-HICK / February 11, 2008 10:30 AM PST

change EEOC etc. read it

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Are you implying the EEOC...
by C1ay / February 11, 2008 7:50 PM PST

...could be used to require employers to hire smokers? If not then where do you draw the line between discrimination and justifiable risk control on the employers behalf?

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read my first post
by WOODS-HICK / February 11, 2008 8:05 PM PST

that will answer your first question.

then read my next two posts; that will answer the rest.

not implying anything. one is opinion the next are laws that will only change through legislation or rebellion (of course one has to be on the winning side).

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by C1ay / February 11, 2008 10:00 PM PST
In reply to: read my first post
then read my next two posts; that will answer the rest.

I didn't see anything in your posts or links about the burden of health insurance in job screening. I don't think the links you've provided cover anything about the health issues associates with an individuals choice of lifestyle habits.
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(NT) ok
by WOODS-HICK / February 11, 2008 10:24 PM PST
In reply to: Nope
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by WOODS-HICK / February 12, 2008 10:25 AM PST
In reply to: Nope

Prohibited Inquiries and Examinations
Before making an offer of employment, an employer may not ask job applicants about the existence, nature, or severity of a disability. Applicants may be asked about their ability to perform job functions. A job offer may be conditioned on the results of a medical examination, but only if the examination is required for all entering employees in the same job category. Medical examinations of employees must be job-related and consistent with business necessity.
Drug and Alcohol Use
Employees and applicants currently engaging in the illegal use of drugs are not protected by the ADA when an employer acts on the basis of such use. Tests for illegal use of drugs are not considered medical examinations and, therefore, are not subject to the ADA's restrictions on medical examinations. Employers may hold individuals who are illegally using drugs and individuals with alcoholism to the same standards of performance as other employees.

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How about
by Steven Haninger / February 12, 2008 9:42 AM PST

no one with Tourette syndrome can apply to work in a barber shop

or Parkinson's as a firearms trainer?

Maybe no one with previous history of leukemia should be allowed to work as a nuclear pharmacist...or in a reactor facility.

How about a medicinally "under control" seizure prone person applying to drive a school bus?

We can also get racial. Should a dairy foods manufacturer be allowed to exclude black and asian Americans from applying to work as cheese tasters just because a high percentage of them are lactose intolerant?

These examples might be a bit far fetched but I'd think a potential employer has some rights to exclude for genetic or medical conditions that don't make a good fit for the job description. That description should certainly be allowed to require an expectation that the employee is healthy and health conscious.

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Actually I can see those
by Roger NC / February 12, 2008 10:22 AM PST
In reply to: How about

more than vegetarians only.

Perhaps I'm just ignorant of recent claims, but I don't belief there is enough justification under healthier to support discrimination in favor of vegetarians (the original question, hypothetical or not).

Personally, I see hiring only vegetarians to be very near forcing someone to accept your belief system (not necessarily organized religions) to get a job. And that is basically illegal (I think).


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It's easy to find specific examples...
by C1ay / February 12, 2008 7:45 PM PST
In reply to: How about

where a particular ailment would disqualify someone for a particular job. What about the cases where the employer is screening applicants for no other reason than to limit the comapany's health insurance costs?

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(NT) Hubby is a color-blind electrician with a CDL ;-)
by Cindi Haynes / February 13, 2008 1:51 AM PST
In reply to: How about
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Is he a little bit color blind or a lot?
by Steven Haninger / February 13, 2008 7:16 AM PST

Test him. Color your hair bright purple and see if he'll take you out to dinner. Happy

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(NT) A LOT (red-green). He's not picky, he'd take me anyway. :-)
by Cindi Haynes / February 13, 2008 11:09 AM PST
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colour blind and
by jonah jones / February 13, 2008 11:39 AM PST

he has a dyslectic monitor?



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i had a friend who was "shades of grey" colour blind
by jonah jones / February 13, 2008 11:46 AM PST

he could see no colour whatsoever...

the amazing thing was, he was an avid gardener (loved roses), was a good photographer (only worked in B&W) and worked for years growing bananas (yellow banana=tasty, green=yukks!)

in all the years i knew him, the only time he asked me about 2 colours was when someone mis-labelled a carton of filter sleeves....



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Color blindness
by Cindi Haynes / February 14, 2008 2:39 AM PST
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just one problem with the link
by jonah jones / February 14, 2008 3:24 AM PST
In reply to: Color blindness
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