Phones forum

General discussion

V300 audio formats?

Hi. I have a V300, and just got the USB cable and software ("Mobile Phone Tools"). I would like to put some songs on my phone. I know there's only a total of 5MB of space (and I have a few hundred K used now, maybe I could delete a few things though and make a tiny bit of room).I don't hear stereo on my phone (btw I don't use a headset), so going mono would help save some space. Also, with the exception of maybe a couple songs, there isn't really any high frequency content (drums, cymbals, etc - highest would be harmonics from a piano), so I don't need a 44kHz sample rate (22kHz max frequency). For most songs I would be ok with 4.4kHz (but no lower) max audio frequency (and for the few that I need to go higher I'd top it off somewhere between 8kHz and 10kHz).
I was doing a few experiments with mp3 encoding (cause I know my phone supports that), and I think that 16kbps 11kHz mono mp3 would probably be fine for the majority of songs, with maybe 32kbps or 40kbps 22kHz mono mp3 for the couple that have high frequency content.

NOW..... to the reason for this post...

By my calculations, I would only have room for about 35 to 40 minutes of music at 16kbps on my phone I'm having trouble deciding which songs I want to sacrifice (not put on the phone).
Soooo....
Does anyone know....
A) what other codecs the Motorola V300 supports
B) Of those codecs, is there one that sounds decent at 8kbps (for example comparable to Lame or iRiver IFP-899 line-in encoded MP3 at 16kbps?)
OR
Is there a way to get mp3 to sound better with a 4.4kHz lowpass filter at 8kbps? I'd be willing to give up some dynamic range (i.e. have the noise floor be somewhat higher - kind-of like listening to a somewhat weak out-of-town AM radio station).
The idea about giving up dynamic range is based on knowing some about wave formats, and the possible fact that with the speaker in the phone it's probably not going to be noticed quite so much. With wave, if you sample something at 16kHz, 16 bit, mono, it will take 32kbytes/sec (for clarification to the "1000" vs "1024" camp out there, when I use small k, it's "1000", and when I use capital K, it's "1024"). If, however, you set it for 16kHz, 8bit, mono, it will be somewhat noisier, but it will take only half the space (at 16kbytes/sec) and will retain the same high frequency content.
Is there an mp3 encoder (or another encoder compatible with my V300) that could reduce to like 8 or even 4 bits per sample? Or, am I just stuck with 16kbps mp3 as being the minimum I can use?

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: V300 audio formats?
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: V300 audio formats?
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.

Popular Forums

icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

GIVEAWAY

Enter to win* a free holiday tech gift!

CNET's giving five lucky winners the gift of their choice valued up to $250!