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Using diffrent ram types In one system

I've recently bought DDR3-1600 (Vengeance-9-9-9-24*1.5v) Dual Channel memory 4gbx2, and I was wondering if I can put this Ram type in which is the HyperX 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 1600 (KHX1600C10D3B1/8G), Is there any disadvantages of using that Plus I'm getting money On September so I'm doing this for the meantime I know what I'm gonna get at that time so Confused any ideas?

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All Answers

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Answer
Seems OK

In reply to: Using diffrent ram types In one system

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Ram

In reply to: Using diffrent ram types In one system

Run a couple of passes of a ram speed test on the old ram.
Write down the numbers.

Remove the old ram.
Fit the new ram in the proper slots to activate dual channel.
Run a couple of passes of a ram speed test.
Write down the numbers.
You should be seeing something close to 20000 MB/s.

Add the old ram and rerun the speed test.
Compare the numbers.

As to whether the new and old ram will play nice together over the long term is a flip of a coin.

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Ram

In reply to: Ram

Soo long term meaning years Months or until sep like i said?

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Ram

In reply to: Ram

It may not work at all if you mix.
You might start to see intermittent crashes every hr/day/week.
That's why you build this up slow and do some testing.
The last thing you need is weekly corrupted files and then having to stop what your doing and spin in backups.

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Using diffrent ram types In one system

In reply to: Using diffrent ram types In one system

You are right about mixing different RAM modules — if there’s one thing you absolutely can’t mix, it’s DDR with DDR2, or DDR2 with DDR3 and so on (they won’t even fit in the same slots). RAM is pretty complicated, but there are a few things you can mix and a few things you shouldn’t. In any case, I don’t recommend it. If you’re buying new RAM, you’re probably going to make your life a lot easier by buying the exact same model as you currently have in your machine. That said, if you absolutely have to mix them, here are some general guidelines.

You want to make sure each stick has the same cas latency, timings and voltage. While you can tweak these settings in the BIOS to make the two sticks match (we briefly showed you how when we discussed overclocking your processor), I don’t know why you’d want to. You’d have to spend quite a bit of time messing around with it all and probably underclock at least one of your DIMMs in the process — and there’s no guarantee it would work even then. Really, it’s a lot more trouble than its worth.

Mixing RAM speed, however, is a slightly different matter. In theory, if you had to, you could mix, say, this Patriot model (DDR3 1333) with this Corsair model (DDR3 1600), since they have the same cas latency, timings and recommended voltage. Your motherboard would probably just automatically underclock the faster one and you wouldn’t run into any problems. Thus, it’s possible, but note that when you start mixing speeds, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, so to speak. Your RAM will only run at the speed of the slowest DIMM, unless you wanted to overclock the others.

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