Question

USB HDD or Enclosure with a HDD in it?

Just as the title says, which one would be better in your opinion in terms of best value for money? Purchasing a USB HDD or a fast internal HDD and use it in a HDD enclosure? This will be used mainly for data backup/restoration purposes so my main concern is the speed and longer lasting product. I am looking at 500GB-2TB but depends on what you recommend and how much it costs.

Thanks

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Answer
IHO, it looks like...

Most ext. HDs use int. type HDs as the storage media. Small and large sizes to include SATA or EIDE types. So, if you have an older int. HD laying around, purchase an ext. USB case and/or use a new HD instead. An ext. HD already made for use tends to have some warranty protection or extended for added cost. So, that's a good deal for any user build ext. HD will only cover the HD itself, the ext. case being a separate item.

If you like look into "HD dock/socket" type mounting. These can use int. or old/new HDs and treat the HD as if like huge flash memory. These too come in 2.5/3.5 size for SATA use and are a quick cure if you use many HDs.

I don't see any big advantages other than current int. HDs is buying one with 3-5yr. warranty can be had vs. a typical 1yr. one. Also, as build ext. HDs usually have some s/w bundle(kit) or provide ready to use setup vs. build and format and access, etc.. Also, all drives above 3Tb MUST have some fix for use on XP or any system limited by over 3Tb access.

FYI- Ext. HD do fail, so back-up multiple times or save super critical data on discs. Treat the ext. HDs like eggs and mount/dismount properly. if it fails and covered by warranty, unless so stated, data is not covered(retrieved).

tada -----Willy Happy

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okay but ...

What are some of the good USB based External HDD on the market for spaces in between 500GB-2TB and their prices?
Also if my system doesn't support USB 3.0 would it make a huge difference in copy/paste as my system has USB 2.0

Lastly these USB External HDD, would I be able to disassemble it in the future if I wanted to use the HDD internally?

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Prices and models vary globally.

Therefore you can ask for such but it's asking a lot!

Let me add I like ROADKIL's UNSTOPPABLE COPIER instead of copy and paste because it seems quite a bit faster. Try that someday.

As to the disassemble question, some folk do not have screwdrivers and such so I can't answer if you can do that. Here, we've opened up many hundred such cases over the years and it's either to put the HDD into some other case or PC.
Bob

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still

I know prices and models vary globally but could you still recommend a few USB Powered External HDD within the range of 500 GB - 2 TB . Budget is not an issue but speed and reliability of the product is and even if I have to get it shipped from overseas I will do it Silly

Thanks

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I recommend...

I recommend models that for USB power include the Y USB power cable. As you may know, even a smallish laptop HDD will approach and even exceed the 500 mA USB power limit so if you want to have less trouble, get that cable or get a drive that comes with that.

I understand you want me to pick a drive but as these are like regular gas, I can't tell you which to buy. All I can add is that only the newbies buy "one." That is, unless you are OK with losing what you put on this temporary storage device.
Bob

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Y USB Cable

Another person recommended me this and I know why it may be required, but if it doesn't come within the package of the HDD I purchase, shouldn't it mean it doesn't require it? Or should I still purchase this and use it with my drive just to be sure? Would it have negative effects if I use it on a drive which doesn't need it?

Thanks

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I wish that was true.

The PC business is cut throat and is not about highly engineered products in this area. If they can save a penny and it works on 99% of the machine over 99.5% they will cheap out.

You will know the moment you plug it into some USB port that doesn't deliver.

You can bet I use this for my USB powered drives and my USB DVDRW when I want to use it for recording (reading is less power so I use either cable.)
Bob

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POV here

USB 3.0 if you have it then you need the whole USB 3.0 setup in order to take advantage of it. Otherwise, it is backward compatible to USB 2.0. It doesn't hurt to read the fine print.

Next, most ext. USB cases can be taken apart. However, some are harder than others just to defeat the end-user causing further problems than what has already occurred. To many that's a hasle but the maker is trying to protect themselves but generally speaking if you did this you void the warranty anyways and you're on your own. But, also, if the HD itself is not at fault but the case PCB that resides to i/f the HD to case, etc., then thatt has to be covered by the warranty which covers everything. The exclusion to that is DIY builds, of course, then only the HD is covered.

Recommend one, well there aren't that many true HD maker's out there. You can count them on one hand. Other labels may use a HD maker's drive mounted in their case, like LaCie or Simple, etc. here, I offer you stick with HD maker labeled ext. drives. If anything, I would recommend Seagate for now. Thus, you pick one you feel fits the bill.

tada -----Willy Happy

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thanks

Thanks for all the insight and answers, I'll narrow it down to a few drives and then ask you guys again for a deal closer Happy

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