Computer Help forum

Question

Unable to boot without Dedicated Graphics card

I am able to boot into Windows just fine, whether I am plugged directly into the mobo, or my GTX graphics card. Either way I use HDMI.

When I try to boot after removing the graphics card, I am completely unable to boot, just plugged into HDMI on the mobo.

When I DO try to boot this way, the machine gets stuck in a reboot loop with no errors, as soon as booting begins for the main hard drive, an SSD, the machine immediately reboots.

Steps tried:

-resetting bios to default

-uninstalling nvidia drivers

-making sure Intel HD graphics driver is installed correctly, it is

-booting with just VGA-booting into safe mode

-Enabling and disabling multi monitor support

- selected IGFX under Primary Display in Bios

All steps failed to resolve.

I have a suspicion that the graphics controller on the mobo is the cause? or the settings or driver related to it? why would I otherwise need a dedicated card plugged in to boot through Intel HD Graphics 3000 with HDMI plugged into my mobo?

My setup:
OS Name Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium
Version 6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601 x64
Main drive: 256GB SSD
Graphics Card: EVGA Nvidia GTX 970
Motherboard: Asus P8Z68 PRO/GEN3
CPU: Intel i5-2500K / iGPU Intel HD Graphics 3000
RAM: 16GB DDR3
Monitor: Single ASUS 1080p, connected with HDMI

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Unable to boot without Dedicated Graphics card
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Unable to boot without Dedicated Graphics card
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.

All Answers

Collapse -
Answer
I've seen that.

In reply to: Unable to boot without Dedicated Graphics card

What I saw was a completely working operational PC that would "boot loop" if we unplugged the GPU.

Fixes have been:

1. Uninstall the GPU's drivers (The Nvidia, use this tool. http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/display-driver-uninstaller/ )
2. Wipe out and start over with the OS.
3. Boot Safe Mode and remove the Nvidia in device manager, etc.

Collapse -
In Reply

In reply to: I've seen that.

I have tried steps 1 and 3, confirmed that, using Intel HD Graphics 3000 in safe mode, that the tool you suggested had removed all Nvidia drivers and files, and the listing was removed from device manager. Unfortunately, after then rebooting with no Nvidia card plugged in, the reboot loop comes right back.

Are there any other possibilities than reinstalling Windows?

Collapse -
Safe mode and...

In reply to: In Reply

Head to MSCONFIG and disable all items. You can re-enable one by one to see what it was.

Popular Forums

icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

REVIEW

Sublime suburban chariot

High on style and technology, the 2019 Volvo XC90 is an incredibly satisfying everyday crossover.