Question

Trying to overclock my cpu

Hello, I've been watching videos on youtube and reading about overclocking your cpu. I have been increasing the clock ratio of my cpu to around 4.2GHz. I did a stress test on my pc but it froze so I had to increase my CPU voltage. I read that it's recommended to increase the voltage to about 1.4v. So I go to my bios and under CPU Vcore I start increasing the voltage number. The problem is the limit on the voltage number is at +0.620v, with a "+" sign in it? Why is this? Why cant I put 1.4v, and what's with the plus sign. I tried searching online but couldn't find anything. You can tell this is my first time overclocking so please don't **** on me too hard heheh.

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Re: overclock

What CPU do you have, what BIOS, and what is the default voltage?

Overclocking, by the way, is never guaranteed. If you really need a reliable faster CPU, buy a more powerful one.

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Re: overclock

AMD FX 8350 with evo hyper 212x fan cooler and a Gigabyte 970A-DS3P motherboard. Buying a new CPU would also require a new motherboard and ram as well that's compatible so it's not gonna be cheap.

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Answer
As to the plus sign

This is really for those overclocker forums but the short answer is the CPU voltage is dynamic today so when you see the + sign it's the boost voltage rather than a fixed voltage. If you want fixed voltages you have to go back about 6 years to older gen CPUs.

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My goodness!

My last overclocking experiments date back to the good old 386 processors. There, if you could get a 150 MHz chip to work stably at 180 or even 200 MHz - great! That was good money saved there - of course, those faster chips were also available, but at a price. Running that processor at 166 MHz was practically never a problem, though.

Today I question the value of the extra speed you can get out of a system that way. In fact, I suspect that a regular configuration with the same power as your overclocked system is probably not only more reliable but also cheaper.

So that leaves us with "overclocking as a hobby" - right?

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Re: overclock

I see, thank you for your reply. But it's hard to find info on how much boost voltage should I adjust for my cpu. I only find fixed voltage values on the internet.

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Re: overclock
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Re: overclock

Oh now I get it, thanks a lot dude!

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