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To dual core, or not to dual core

Over the years, I have done some upgrading and component work on various computers. I am currently looking to build a system. In the past, Intel and AMD have been competing for core speed with various processors, then shifted to their respective "extreme" versions. Up until now, you could work within the confines of what motherboard could be upgraded to a faster processor, if you didn't need the top speeds right away. Lets face it, it was all single core, and understandable.

Now I am putting together, what is probably a very average machine. One that would be used for home, family and maybe small business use. I don't currently need extreme speed. But, on the other hand, I want this to still be upgradable in the future.

Now comes the dilema. The only thing you see now is dual core processors, and dual core graphics. Do I have to now start rethinking my MB choices to allow for dual core,just because that is the only expansion that will be available in the future? Any thoughts?

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tricky question

In reply to: To dual core, or not to dual core

that is a good question. although for home use, any cpu bought today would be fine. unless you do some demanding photo shop and multi tasking, there really is no reason to go dual core, unless you want a great deal of power for the future games that utilize that dual core.

intel socket LGA775 is used for dual core, so that really isnt a problem upgrading.

amd on the otherhand is going to be making a new socket soon, so i cant help you there.

also posted by you
"dual core graphics"
i dont know of any, please share your info if you do, i only know sli.

hope this helps

konny

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Re: Dual-Core

In reply to: To dual core, or not to dual core

Good point.

Myself, I believe dual-core is the future and I will get it in my next computer, mainly for the feature of being able to do several things at the same time without taxing your PC and slowing it down. I don't believe there is any claim that Dual-Core is much faster than single core.

Right now Intel has dual-core processors available to the public much less expensive than what AMD has indicated for their yet to be released complete line up of dual-core processors. Dual-Core is not necessarily the fastest and AMD will still lead in their FX 55 single core-processors.

I believe in your reference to ''dual core graphics'' you were talking about dual core video cards (SLI). In my opinion SLI is not needed at all unless you are going to go for very high end gaming, something that I would probably never go to. I have read however, that there will be Dual-Core Processor computers with dual video card PCIe (SLI) to please the gamers.

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Re: Dual-Core

In reply to: Re: Dual-Core

If you are rendering video the dual processor will make a big difference. I have done some testing with my dual processor PC. Video is where dual core/dual processors really shine.
The dual core arena is in a lot of flux right now and prices will be comming down soon (I hope).
Games at this time are single threaded but, this will change over time.
You could get a AMD64 socket 939 and upgread to a dual core later on. John

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Re:.............

In reply to: Re: Dual-Core

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depends

In reply to: To dual core, or not to dual core

If you plan on just doing the basics, any cpu will work. However, if you want to upgrade, here's what I'll say:

There are 3 choices, Intel's Pentium Extreme Edition, the Pentium D, and the Athlon 64 X2 as of this point.

Although Intel's chips use the LGA775 socket, you need a 955 chipset mobo to support it, which costs over $200. Not very pleasant. You can't use anything older.

AMD's Athlon 64 X2 uses a S939 pin layout. Any S939 mobo will support it with a simple BIOS flash and I think I saw some from newegg.com for under $70. However, you may need to wait a little until this chip becomes more plentiful.

I would take AMD because it rips the Pentium D in every benchmark except for DivX. Even then, it's only by a small margin.

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Building a Shuttle PC right now with X2 4800+

In reply to: depends

Will share results when finished

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niceeeeee

In reply to: Building a Shuttle PC right now with X2 4800+

are you going to be using the sn25p? cuz that looks like shuttles best most expandable xpc for amd right now.

konny

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No I am using the ST20G

In reply to: niceeeeee

The SN25P does not have a PCI slot and I will be using this for Media center applications with Snapstream, So I need to put in a tuner card, plus I like the G form factor size better

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(NT) (NT) beautiful choice :)

In reply to: No I am using the ST20G

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Have we reached the single core max?

In reply to: depends

As Angryfirelord suggest, I would be going with an AMD Athlon 64 X2 processor. The S939 has the most upgrade possibilities at this point. And yes, I did misspeak, when I said "dual core graphics". I was referring to SLI.
The single question that AMD and Intel don't seem to be answering, is whether there are going to be any more choices in single core, or is it all dual core from now on.

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Have we reached the single core max?

In reply to: Have we reached the single core max?

Keep in mind that nothing happens overnight. The 32bit processors are still selling. The AMD64s came out near the end of 2003 but it wasn't untill 2005 that they realy became popular. The dual cores are just out now and still big $$$$.
So As I gaze into my cup of coffee to see the future and using a lot SWAG (Scientific Wild A** Guess).
The 32 bit processors will be around for a few more years in low cost PCs. The 64bit single core will become the main stream and the dual cores will be the highend. I don't think this is any big news, just a repeat of history. John

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Maybe 12-18 months more for FX single core..

In reply to: Have we reached the single core max?

I agree generally with what jcrobso has said, however here is what a CNet News Staff Writer just said yesterday:

"......the processor (FX57) could be the last single-core processor in AMD's FX series. Both AMD and rival Intel have set themselves on a path to switch their processor products from single-core to dual-core technology, which entails placing two computer processors on one piece of silicon."

"Jonathan Seckler, AMD's Athlon 64 product marketing manager, told CNET News.com that Athlon FX series processors will continue to ship with just one core for at least 12 months to 18 months."

http://news.com.com/AMDs+new+FX+chip+kicks+up+speed%2C+price/2100-1006_3-5763925.html?tag=nefd.ac

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I'm almost ready

In reply to: Maybe 12-18 months more for FX single core..

It would appear that if I intend to keep up at all with upgrades in the future, then I need to be sure that I get a MB that will accept Dual core. Assuming I am going to go with AMD, will any S939 that accepts up to FX processors be a safe bet? Do I have to check the specs of every perspective board to see if it will be expandable to dual core? It looks like I'm almost there, but just need a bit more help.

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almost there....

In reply to: I'm almost ready

ASUS has announced 8 or 10 P5 (dual-core) motherboards and 4 or 5 AMD motherboards. Check them out. They may be a bit more expensive but they're worth it. I have been usuing them for over 10 yrs. I have found that the new speeds expected now probably are more than most users need. It seems that gamers and designers would most benefit from dual-core. You will probably be very content with a high-end P4 3.4-3.6 with hyperthreading. PC3200 memory (at least 1gb) SATA drives (10000rpm) with a high capacity EIDE drive (160gb - 250gb; 7200rpm with 8mb cache) for your photos, downloads and music. Get the ATI X800 and plenty of USB2 ports. Also, get a high capacity external EIDE drive for backup. Oh yeah...I like red lights ;-|.

Jack

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Hmmm.....ANY 939???

In reply to: I'm almost ready

From what I have read the AMD dual core is on the 90nm process and the ease of migration to Multi-Core Processors with 939-pin motherboards is the
Socket infrastructure being compatible with existing 90nm single-core processor architecture.

Perhaps those people that have motherboards with a 939-pin AMD Athlon 64 Processors other than than the following 90nm processors should check with AMD or mobo maker to see if their mobo will accept the AMD dual core:

939-pin Processor Model 3500, 3200, 3000 (has 90mn process)
The 3500 can be purchased with 130nm or 90nm process

The FX Processor series 55 & below have 939 or 940 pin with 130nm process

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