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They're just figuring this out now?

by JP Bill / January 14, 2009 12:47 PM PST
Surgery checklists could save lives, study reveals

Airline pilots have used them for years as a proven method to make flying less dangerous. Now there is evidence that surgical staff can dramatically curb the amount of harm they inadvertently do to patients simply by working through checklists before, during and after operations.

Employing a standard checklist slashes the number of serious complications and deaths from surgery by more than a third, an international study published Wednesday by hospitals in Toronto and seven other cities concluded.

The concept could have a huge impact if incorporated into all two million operations performed yearly in Canadian hospitals, experts said Wednesday
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Something wrong here.
by drpruner / January 14, 2009 12:49 PM PST

I know I've seen references to counting instruments before and after, for obvious reasons. There must be other checking, too.

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RE: counting instruments before and after
by JP Bill / January 18, 2009 12:12 PM PST
In reply to: Something wrong here.

Sometimes?

Winnipeg tries apologetic approach to deal with medical mistakes

After her abdominal operation last summer, the patient's hip started to ache. The symptom of a painful joint was hardly a surprise - she was a senior citizen - but the cause of it, picked up on an X-ray, was: a pair of four-inch forceps floating in her abdominal cavity.

What happened next is equally astonishing: The surgeon who performed the gynecological procedure in a Winnipeg operating room apologized. Hospital staff followed up with their own apology, telling the patient if she required any help, it was available.

It's all part of a new approach by Winnipeg officials, hailed as the first of its type in Canada: apologizing to patients when a mistake is made and offering compensation where appropriate.

It's all part of a new approach by Winnipeg officials, hailed as the first of its type in Canada: apologizing to patients when a mistake is made and offering compensation where appropriate.

Mistakes in medicine have long been seen as something best buried with the patient. In the past, the tendency to defend and deny has been favoured by malpractice lawyers and insurers, who feared full disclosure would unleash a torrent of lawsuits.

That way of thinking is slowly beginning to change due to a patient safety movement, boosted by research - and experience in the United States, showing that patients are actually less likely to sue if they are provided with full disclosure and an apology.



telling the patient if she required any help, it was available.

Help? Removing the forceps from her abdomen?.....why would she need help?

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