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Tell It Like It Is on Energy

by Mark5019 / October 31, 2005 9:32 PM PST

Here in my neighborhood, the price of gasoline has been dropping faster than the president's poll numbers. But Bush's ratings make the news in every broadcast for days. Surely everyone has heard by now, newsies, why must you harp on the subject like your reports were paid commercials? How come you don't keep up that drumbeat when he's doing well?
By contrast, the drop in gas prices is scarcely mentioned at all, and one continues to hear the old news about how the price has skyrocketed since Hurricane Katrina (which, by the way, Bush: a. caused, and b. deliberately failed to clean up in order to kill off the black population of New Orleans. This has contributed to his declining poll numbers, in case you hadn't heard.)

Just a few weeks ago, stations around here were asking $3.19 a gallon, but now their signs mostly read in the $2.30 - $2.40 range, and I understand similar trends have been evidenced in the rest of the country. So why aren't people ? and the media ? thanking the oil companies for cutting their prices by eighty cents a gallon or more? Why at least, aren't the media reporting this great good news, like they would have if the price had gone UP eighty cents during October?

Hey, everybody was quick to jump on Exxon's butt when the price "skyrocketed", isn't it only fair to send them some love when the price plummets? Instead, the politicians, ever behind the times, are now talking about a windfall profits tax (the Democrats' idea) or a law forcing the companies to invest their profits in building more refineries (the wimpy Republican fallback position).

gas here is 2.35 reg

http://www.townhall.com/opinion/columns/jaybryant/2005/11/01/173709.html

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Response
by JP Bill / October 31, 2005 11:03 PM PST
isn't it only fair to send them some love when the price plummets?

When (if) the oil companies take the "blame" for the prices going up,

THEN

They can take the "credit" for the prices going down.

Usually when prices go up, the oil companies say it's because of increased demand or reduced supply.

When prices go down it's because of decreased demand or increased supply.

They have all the bases covered.
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But that's perfectly consistent and logical
by EdH / October 31, 2005 11:16 PM PST
In reply to: Response

What's your problem with it? Why should they take the blame for something they don't control?

I don't see them taking credit for lower prices. But if you are going to blame them for rising prices than ro be consistent you have to thank them for lower prices.

Personally I think you should be thanking them regardless because of the incredible service they provide in making the modern world run.

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Response
by JP Bill / October 31, 2005 11:38 PM PST
Usually when prices go up, the oil companies say it's because of increased demand or reduced supply.

When prices go down it's because of decreased demand or increased supply.


I seldom hear the oil companies mention the word "profit" in their explanation of gas prices. They say high taxes, gov says high oil prices.

A few years ago, I was working at a job 500 Km from my home. I live near an oil refinery. The price of gas was 5
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Resonse
by EdH / October 31, 2005 11:42 PM PST
In reply to: Response
I seldom hear the oil companies mention the word "profit" in their explanation of gas prices.

Because that is not why prices go up and down.
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Are you saying
by JP Bill / October 31, 2005 11:53 PM PST
In reply to: Resonse

that profits are not included in the price of gas/oil?

If not, where do the profits come from? donations?

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We've discussed this quite a bit already.
by EdH / November 1, 2005 12:04 AM PST
In reply to: Are you saying

Profits are included of course. Companies are entitled to make a profit. Otherwise they would not have areasin to be in business. Do you work for no pay?

The reasons prices were high for a while has nothing to do with profits and everything to do with supply and demand, mostly due to the hurricanes but also because of increased demand from China and India.

The reason of record high profits lately is because of high sales volume. Had it not been for the hurricanes the profits would have been even highter.

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Instead of oil...
by J. Vega / November 1, 2005 12:00 AM PST
In reply to: Resonse

Instead of oil, consider the drug Tamiflu. Heck, remeber what happened when Johnny Carson made a joke about a toilet paper shortage on the Tonight Show.

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Tamiflu costs are astronomical. I was quoted over $6.00 per
by gearup / November 1, 2005 2:08 AM PST
In reply to: Instead of oil...

pill AFTER my insurance paid.

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