Computer Help forum

General discussion

System Restore

by Phil411 / September 16, 2008 8:21 AM PDT

Hey, A little help please...
I use multiple external Hdds on my Win XP(SP3) system regularly and I have to go into system properties and turn off system restore everytime I connect my drives. I dont require it, other than for my system drive and was wondering if there was a way to permanently disable the system restore feature for the externals, while keeping it on for the system drive.

Thanks.

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: System Restore
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: System Restore
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Do not have XP but Google came up with this...
by glenn30 / September 16, 2008 11:21 AM PDT
In reply to: System Restore
Collapse -
Gave It A Look
by Phil411 / September 16, 2008 12:06 PM PDT

Thanks. Checked it out however didnt help much.

Collapse -
Just wondering
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / September 16, 2008 9:49 PM PDT
In reply to: System Restore

if there is a need to do this.

You say that you connect/disconnect these multiple external drives regularly.

Unless you make changes to your system, install Windows Updates, or manually create a System Restore point, is there any need to go into System Properties and turn off SR for the particular drive you have connected at any given moment?

Strange though. I have just turned on my external USB hard disk, and see no option in System Properties > System Restore tab for this external.

Mark

Collapse -
Re: system restore
by Kees Bakker / September 16, 2008 9:53 PM PDT
In reply to: System Restore

How do you enable/disable system restore at drive level. As far as I know it's only on system level.

Can you explain "I have to go into system properties and turn off system restore". Why do you have to? A pop-up telling you to do it? The system refusing to do anything until you do? That's not clear at the moment.

Kees

Collapse -
Kees said:
by RCF_Rose / September 17, 2008 12:40 AM PDT
In reply to: Re: system restore

"How do you enable/disable system restore at drive level. As far as I know it's only on system level."

Well, I have two HDDs and 11 partitions. If I go into System Propertiers all partitions show up under Available Drives and under Status it says "Monitoring".

If you highlight a partition and press Settings you get the option to turn off SR for that partition and also to choose the amount of disk space you want to use for the restore.

In Windows Explorer I see that each partition has a System Volume Information folder.

My questions are: Does each partiton indeed have a Restore apart from the C: drive? And if so how and where would you restore a partition? And why would you need to?


@
\)/
Rose

Collapse -
System Restore
by helljack6 / September 17, 2008 2:37 AM PDT
In reply to: Kees said:

Answer to your question is NO. Each drive attached to the system AFTER the system drive does not have a restore point, just a system volume infomation storage point. This is used to reference the MFT, hold useless things such as date/time stamps and other things that end users only see the final product of.

System restore is just that, a tool for restoring the system and all system files pertaining to that system, nothing more or less. That is why if you've ever ran system restore before, you get a warning saying that you won't lose any new files or documents or pictures you may have recently saved during this procedure because those are not affected during the process, ONLY system files, system file states and registry are affected during system restore.

Collapse -
ONLY system files
by RCF_Rose / September 17, 2008 3:09 AM PDT
In reply to: System Restore

OK, what you say makes perfect sense and pretty much what I suspected. So I wonder why the option to turn System Restore off on those partitions is even there.

So is it OK to turn System Restore off on all those partitions? Or move the slider to 0? I don't suppose any space is being used anyway is it?

Here is a screen shot.

http://img381.imageshack.us/my.php?image=screenshot033iv8.jpg


@
\)/
Rose

Collapse -
system restore
by helljack6 / September 17, 2008 3:27 AM PDT
In reply to: ONLY system files

....on those partitions is even there.

So is it OK to turn System Restore off on all those partitions? Or move the slider to 0? I don't suppose any space is being used anyway is it?

Here is a screen shot........


Me personally, I shut system restore off anyways when I initially set up the computer. Here's why:

I have found that several virus and spywayre/malware scanners find infected system files in restore point snapshots (what Windows System Restore takes) Why would you want to have a perfectly clean disk with infected restore points?

ALOT of space is being used by your system restore feature, up to 12% of your drive, and depending on the size of your drive, that could be alot. If you have a 40gb drive, 12% of that is being used to store restore points, each of which can be huge, infected and /or possibly even corrupted snapshots.

Once the system is set up the way YOU the end user wants it, keeping up with daily updates of virus and spyware/malware scanner programs and scanning regularly could almost be more valuable than rolling back to a restore point.

On that note, I will say this much, for clients, I initially shut it off when i'm cleaning or setting up a system for the first time, then when I'm finished, I offer them the option of turning it back on and showing them how to do it if they want to do it themselves, but it's always their choice.

Collapse -
OK. Thanks
by RCF_Rose / September 17, 2008 3:35 AM PDT
In reply to: system restore

@
\)/
Rose

Collapse -
No there
by Phil411 / September 17, 2008 7:59 AM PDT
In reply to: Re: system restore

isnt a need. But I don't need to use system restore on any drive other the system.

Collapse -
Thanks For the Contributions
by Phil411 / September 17, 2008 8:05 AM PDT
In reply to: System Restore

However my question hasn't been addressed... Is there a way to disable SR and keep it off, on non-system drives? Maybe a registry hack?

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

The Samsung RF23M8090SG

One of the best French door fridges we've tested

A good-looking fridge with useful features like an auto-filling water pitcher and a temperature-adjustable "FlexZone" drawer. It was a near-flawless performer in our cooling tests.