Networking & Wireless forum

General discussion

Switch vs. Hub

Good Day all...

I am having some performance issues with a network accounting package, and talking with the IT person at the developer I am being told by him that using a switch with network intensive software such as this over a mapped network drive isn't going to do as well as using a hub would..

He says: "It seems to have to do with the number of files that each workstation has open when they are in the software. Switches don't seem to be able to handle that traffic as well as hubs could"

This really doesn't sound accurate according to everything that I am reading on-line about hubs and switches. I am actually reading that it is the other way around where the switch should better handle the load whereas a hub wouldn't..

Am I wrong here??

Thank you...

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Switch vs. Hub
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Switch vs. Hub
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Re: Switch vs. Hub

In reply to: Switch vs. Hub

Dumb hubs are deadly for business use. With a switched hub not only can machine 1 talk to machine 2 at the same time that machine 3 talks to server 10, but if Buffy's machine's network card fails it does not bring the entire company network down.

Give the price of switched 10/100 hubs you can't afford to keep a dumb hub in a business.

It's the cheapest way to speed up a LAN.

In closing, I don't find dumb hubs in many businesses since most got tired of the problems.

Bob

Collapse -
Re: Switch vs. Hub

In reply to: Re: Switch vs. Hub

So, if I understand you correctly, a switch should be way more efficient than a dumb hub and have no problem with accessing info via a mapped drive. Right?

Thanks...

Collapse -
Re: Switch vs. Hub

In reply to: Re: Switch vs. Hub

I've never heard or read that a switched hub would do that. And certainly have never found this to be true. Just sharing that I've tossed dozens of non-switched hubs in the trash bins over the years. They cost the companies too much to leave in the network. Hope this helps clear that up.

Remember that switched hubs are "commodity items" with 8 ports being some under 20 bucks. http://www.compgeeks.com/details.asp?invtid=SIL-A-8309&cat=NET The loss that a company usually experiences because of the unswitched hubs usually hits the thousands of bucks.

Bob

Collapse -
Re: Switch vs. Hub

In reply to: Switch vs. Hub

That IT person is a moron, stop talking to him.

Collapse -
Re: Switch vs. Hub

In reply to: Switch vs. Hub

You are correct. I'm not sure why your IT guy is telling you that Hubs are better.. they are not. There are one or two other things you may want ot check as well.

1. Make sure that the port on the switch that the PC is plugged in to is running at 100Mb full duplex, if it is set to auto it doesn't always mean that it is.

2. Make sure that the NIC on the PC is also set to 100Mb full duplex.

3. If your network has VLAN's make sure that the router is configured correctly and that there aren't any Routing Loops. It might be wise to put the server and the PC on the same VLAN if they are not already. If they are check to see if the PC has a HOSTS and LMHOSTS file configured properly.

4. Check to see how large a packet size the router is allowing if you are crossing a router.

5. Check to see how many file locks the software has allowed. It may even be down to the PC not being beefy enough.

Hope this helps.

Raz.

Popular Forums

icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

DEALS, DEALS, DEALS!

Best Black Friday Deals

CNET editors are busy culling the list and highlighting what we think are the best deals out there this holiday season.