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struct by a virus (ouch!)

Hello,

My computer was recently hit by a bad virus. I have to reformat my drive. Before I take out my hard drive to take it to a service to extract my files, I wanted to save all my bookmarks.
Is there a file in the system that holds all the bookmarks. In 'safe mode' all my bookmarks are gone, so I can't write them down. Is there a way to save it to my desktop so it can be backed up with the other data?
Is it possible to find it?

thanks.
chrisusvi

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If you mean

In reply to: struct by a virus (ouch!)

IE Favorites...

Favorites are located in:

C:\Windows\Favorites

You can try copying them from a DOS prompt:

Boot from a startup floppy (if you don't have any, you may download one from www.bootdisk.com), and from the A:\ prompt type:

?C:? (no quotes and press enter)

Take out the startup floppy and place a newly formatted floppy in the drive.

Now type:

COPY WINDOWS\FAVORITES\*.* A: (press enter)

- This will copy the favorites to the floppy.

The above procedure should work IF the HDD is still accessible.

Good luck.

Zee

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Re: favorites.

In reply to: struct by a virus (ouch!)

I'm afraid Blue Zee's answer is incomplete, in sofar that the copy command doesn't copy the favorites in the subfolders. I'd use a xcopy-command with /s switch.

And there's no real need to copy to a diskette. Any other folder that happens to be included in your backup serves just as well.

And there's no real need to use DOS-commands. In Safe Mode Explorer will work, and you can use that to do with the c:\windows\favorites folder whatever you like. You might prefer the graphical user interface offered by Explorer above the command prompt.

And: if you use profiles, your favorites will be in folder somewhere in your profile, not in c:\windows (each user has his own favorites).

For the future: when you're up and running again, in IE simply do File>Import and Export>Export favorites to get them all in one html-file that you can easily include in your regular backup and import again.

Hope this helps.


Kees

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Kees, I can't tell if chrisusvi

In reply to: Re: favorites.

has IE or Firefox. The lack of info leaves me guessing. So if it is Firefox is the processes and location the same for coping bookmarks? I not sure if my suggestion to use Ad-Aware will even do anything for a computer that uses Firefox?

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Re: Firefox favorites

In reply to: Kees, I can't tell if chrisusvi

The best way to backup (or copy or move) Firefox 'bookmarks' (as they are called indeed) is using File>Export (and File>Import when necessary) from the Bookmark Manager menu.
No need at all to find out where Firefox stores them internally if such a mechanism exists.

Kees

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try cleaning it?

In reply to: struct by a virus (ouch!)

Because you said you were working in safe mode, I get the idea that the attack has taken over your computer to the point that normal anti-virus tools are not working. The attack may have damaged the anti-virus program. Before you take out your hard drive to take it to a service to extract your files, you may as well try to fix it with your anti-virus program. You will likely need to reinstall your anti-virus program to get it working again.

I feel that the attack is more likely to be a Spyware/Adware problem. I would download the free version of Ad-Aware from www.lavasoft.com and run it in safe mode. Spyware and Adware removal programs often work in the safe mode.

I want to let you know that making copies of files or of favorites at this point may just let you infect the computer once you have it back. Some viruses can reload themselves from your computer?s memory/RAM so reformatting the HDD does not always remove all viruses. Often, an anti-virus program starts the scan by checking the ram first.

If you must pull your files and favorites scan the medium you stored the files on with an up-to-date anti-virus program and also with an anti-spyware program before installing the files on any computer.

I would suggest that you take CNET?s class ?Combating Spyware and Adware?. The class is free except for your time. When you sinup,you will need to setup a login name and provide an email address, the class lessons and assignments are handled that way.

Good luck, I hope this helps.

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struct by a virus (ouch!) REVISED

In reply to: try cleaning it?

I apologize for not stating the browser I used.
I am am using Firefox.

Sorry.

chrisusvi

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