Question

Source code protection--- help please!!!!

Hi everyone.

My friend and I have a tech start up and are on the verge of hiring our first employee. The employee will have extensive coding experience and will be the one ultimately to code and program the entire website.

As neither one of us has IT background and the candidate will know this too, is there a way we can protect this code? (For example, something out there that we can make the code reliant on so without the something else, she can't operate the code) Or a way we can prevent any modification or transfer of code without our authority Please assist us! Any advice or suggestion is helpful and will be greatly appreciated!!!

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Re: source code protection

It best to hire someone you trust.

The law is on your side (if you pay here, you're the owner of the code and she may not use it elsewhere or sell it to somebody else), but you have no way to enforce that, except suing her after she did.

Kees

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Thanks for your reply!

Hi there,

Thank you for your response- so there isn't a technical method in trying to prevent them from modifying it or a way to make the source code dependent on something else so without that 'something else' they wouldnt be able to operate it

Thanks again

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Re: source code

No, there isn't.

Creating and modifying the source code is her primary task.
And that 'something else' is something she defines and can just as easily circumvent.

It really is quite easy to copy all the source code from your PC or laptop where you write it to a USB-stick and use it elsewhere. Or - if the PC doesn't have USB - to mail it to your gmail-account and use it elsewhere. Nothing you can do about it, except sitting next to her for 100% of her working time.

Kees

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Answer
nothing technical just get a lawyer

you may want a lawyer to draw up an employee contract regarding your concerns. as already mentioned, even without a contract as long as the employee is actually working for the company, all work done belongs to the company.

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Answer
I agree with all so far.

If you don't trust that new employee, why hire them?

Also, make sure your content and more is on a backup system that you know how to restore if this is your sole means of running the business. No web system to date runs without you knowing how it works. Maybe a few more years?

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