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Social Security Myths

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Re: Social Security Myths

In reply to: Social Security Myths

Hi, MK,

An excellent, concise article.

I probably get that email re: Congressmen and SS at least once a month. Though I have sent the Snopes bit about that, they continue to send them.

Sigh!

Angeline
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

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Well, Angeline...

In reply to: Re: Social Security Myths

Well, Angeline, all I know is that I paid into Social Security for over 20 years, and although I went to the Federal Government and became medically disabled well past that 1983 date my Federal Disability pension is reduced by a siginificant portion of my Social Security payments. Note: If you go medically disabled while working for the U.S. Government, you are required to file for Social Security benefits also.
Ah, well, it may get "interesting" with Social Security, I'm in the process of asking for (make that demanding) that I be provided with a helper (or whatever the term is) until I get some things straightened out - there are limits to what you can do from a wheelchair, like go upstairs in the house. If nothing else, this might get interesting. I'm in the mood of the newscaster (Howard, wasn't it?) in the movie "Network".

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Re: Well, Angeline...

In reply to: Well, Angeline...

Hi, J,

If the AARP members had not raised the roof about having to pay a very reasonable sum for that "catastrophic" coverage back in the late 80's, there would have been help re: care-giving for lots of folks.

I had disability for 1 1/2 years when my sight became so compromised, so I know about the SS reduction.

I sent you an email.

Angeline
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

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Thanks, Angeline...

In reply to: Re: Well, Angeline...

Thanks, Angeline, both the clerk of the circuit judge and I both have been trying to remember a good term to use for somebody to come over here once a week or so and help he do some stuff. "care giver" will fill the bill perfectly. I'll check my e-mail right now.

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Re: Social Security Myths

In reply to: Social Security Myths

Hi, MK.

>>The pensions available under this old system depend on the federal worker?s pay and tenure with the government, but by law can?t exceed 80% of the final year?s pay. <<
That's not exactly corect -- it's true for year one of retirement, but subsequent COLAs aren't included. My father retired under the Civil Service pension plan in 1968, and drew benefits for over 20 years. His final year's benefit was more than twice his salary when he retired.

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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Well, let's see, Dave...

In reply to: Re: Social Security Myths

Well let's see, Dave. I went disabled while working for the Federal government in '91, and after my disability pension and Social Security are "crunched", my take home checks total is siginificantly less tham my take home when I was working.

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Re: Well, let's see, Dave...

In reply to: Well, let's see, Dave...

You are correct J. The laws apply differently to persons now in need of disability or retirement than when his father retired. And I wish you good luck with the SS benefits. Unfortunately there are too many like you suffering, through no fault of their own.

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No sweat, MK!

In reply to: Re: Well, let's see, Dave...

No sweat, MK! I'm about to make a "stink", and if naught else, it's going to be a wild, and perhaps entertaining, ride. Ah, well, I've never subpoenaed myself before (legally required). 'Gonna cost me $110, Da** it, I wonder if it's deductible (big grin!)

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Re: Well, let's see, Dave...

In reply to: Well, let's see, Dave...

I was disabled in 1980....disability SS pays 50% of what you would be entitled to at retirement (or at least that's what I was told back then). My checks at that time were equal to slightly more than half of my normal take home pay at that point. If it wasn't for the death benefits being paid to my three daughters from their father's death, we would have lost our house in a hurry. Due to cost of living increases over the years, I now, 24 years later, have enough income from SS to live 'comfortably' in this small town, but it would not have been enough to continue to live in Cleveland, Ohio even in my house which had a house payment then of less than what rent is now for an apartment. If something should develop at this late stage in my life and SS required me to be removed from my status with them and return to work, I would not qualify for anything other than a minimum wage position after all these years because I would be starting back at the bottom in 'experience'...and there wouldn't be enough net pay to stay even in this house unless I took in a border.

I've got about six or 9 years til 'retirement', and SS can't tell me what that benefit would be because I'm already collecting from their Disability department. I haven't been able to find out if the benefit I get now is still considered to be half (50%) of my retirement benefit at age 65, since so many cost of living increases over the years have brought it to the amount it is, or if that full retirement benefit will be based on the 50% benefit I started off with.

I'll just have to wait and see........

TONI

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Sounds about right, Toni...

In reply to: Re: Well, let's see, Dave...

Sounds about right for my case, Tony. I'll let you know after I get the court to subpoena my financial paperwork from my guardian and audit them.

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You should all thank R. Reagan for the

In reply to: Sounds about right, Toni...

restrictions on SS disability. It was one of the things he nsisted was necessary to keep unscrupulous individuals from ripping off the system with false claims!

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Sorry, gearup...

In reply to: You should all thank R. Reagan for the

Sorry, gearup, that paying double the list price for my wheelchair scam that I mentioned happened during the Clinton administration, as did the other nonsense that I have mentioned in the past.

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Re: You should all thank R. Reagan for the

In reply to: You should all thank R. Reagan for the

The first thing he did when he entered office was to knock everybody off disability benefits and make them re-sign up. The second thing he did immediately was revoke all the SS death benefits for kids who used to get them until age 22 and were in college so they ended the day they graduated high school instead. Many kids could no longer afford to go to college unless they qualified for pell or other grants/funding when those death benefits helped pay for alot more than people thought they did. All of my daughters were close to college age and didn't have the means anymore to get there with as even community colleges cost more than we could afford at that time. It wasn't until years later that one of my daughters entered the Navy in order to get her education, and she was already married and had a daughter of her own.

TONI

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