General discussion

Small, Fast, Neat, Stable, family camera recomendation?

Please,
I am trying to get a new camera, my old one is a Casio Exilim but is death.
I learned what we need our next family camera.
1. Fast shooting, and minimum shutter lag time.
2. Size (smallest possible)
2. Clean and acceptable pictures
3. Stability or/and anti-shake
4. Use of SD card
5. Budget < 400$
Please advice.
Thanks

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Comments
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Sony DSC-WX5

1. Should have as little shutter lag as the model it replaces, the WX1, making it one of the fastest compacts available

2. 3.6" x 2.0" x 0.8"

3. Sample gallery here: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/WX5/WX5GALLERY.HTM

4. Uses real, optical image stabilization; a 5x zoom, 24-120mm lens

5. Accepts SD, SDHC, and SDXC cards (and Sony Memory Sticks as well)

6. Under $300

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Thanks

Thank you I haven't looked at this, I will do it now.
Any other suggestion in case I am not convinced, I am not a very good fan of Sony.
Thanks again

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Canon S95

The S95 is considered one of the best compacts in terms of image quality, but Canons in general are not particularly fast. Its advantages though are many, including a larger imaging sensor and a larger aperture lens for better low light performance. It also has semi and full manual controls. A full review is here:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/PS95/PS95A.HTM

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Thanks

Thank you all

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