Question

Should I upgrade my non touch screen notebook to win10?

I keep receiving this reminder whenever i boot up my notebook asking me to upgrade to win10. I am using a non touch screen . should i upgrade?

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Answer
Can't tell.

My son had a failing 2009 Sony that turned out to be a few issues. One was a failing HDD so that was easy to cure. But it left me with a great test vehicle to see Windows 10 on a non-touch Windows 7 laptop from 2009. That's older than a lot of laptops today. This machine has a Core2Duo and 4GB RAM. It would pause and such under a factory install of 7 so in 2 steps I move it to Windows 10. First I removed the Mcafee using the Mcafee removal tool and then used the CNET post about fetch 10 early.

It's better than new now and one last step. I installed Classic Shell.
Note:Edited for spelling.

Post was last edited on September 25, 2015 12:22 PM PDT

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Answer
Depends on what you have and if you have a reason.

You didn't say what you have. Also you didn't say if there is anything in 10 that you need. If what you have is working fine and doing what you need, then my advice is to wait until May 2016 and then see. You can get the free upgrade any time before 7/29/16 so what's the rush?
`
Good luck.

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I agree

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"

Your mileage may vary but I've not seen anything in 10 that is compelling enough to warrant a rush to upgrade. I believe the kernel may be a little faster than 7 but on the other hand, I've seen reports that 10 is slower than 8.1.

The consolidated fix updates have been coming thick and fast, so the 5 million Insider testers didn't find all the bugs, so I'd be inclined to wait anyway until it's settled down a bit.

I don't think Touch/Non-Touch is a significant issue. 10 Will detect whether you have a keyboard attached and default to desktop mode, not try to force you into tiles like 8 did.

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Privacy Issues

Ken -- The Computer Hobbyist
I am running activated, stand alone of Windows 10 Pro. The problem I have with it, is that I had a lot of the privacy issues with it, so I changed many settings to off for more privacy and the next Windows updates, there were set back to on and I had bad privacy again... You say that, I'm not a bad person, do you do banking or use credit cards on the internet, then beware !!!
Also malware, adware, spyware, and misc, This is what not turning certain settings off can do... On your internet browsers (Firefox and Google Chrome), you can use WOT (Web of Trust), Adblock Plus, Flag, these are add on's...

I believe, that people with less savvy, should wait 6 or 8 months to let Microsoft get some of the bugs out and more updates. You can get Windows 10 free for 1 year from July 29, 2015 to July 29, 2016

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Answer
Wait 6 to 8 months

I have Windows 7 Pro, 8.1 Pro, 10 Pro, running on my desk top computer. I tend to use Windows 8.1, while Microsoft working the bugs out and gets more updates....

I believe, that people with less savvy, should wait 6 or 8 months to let Microsoft get some of the bugs out and more updates. You can get Windows 10 free for 1 year from July 29, 2015 to July 29, 2016

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Have 10, no bugs here.

I read that comment a lot. What bug is that? The recurring "bug" is usually an issue that the installer (you, me, others) did an upgrade but didn't know to go get drivers or such to fix a sleep or other issue.

-> That is, today's everyday user expected Microsoft to do that for us.

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Privacy Issues

Ken -- The Computer Hobbyist
I am running activated, stand alone of Windows 10 Pro. The problem I have with it, is that I had a lot of the privacy issues with it, so I changed many settings to off for more privacy and the next Windows updates, there were set back to on and I had bad privacy again... You say that, I'm not a bad person, do you do banking or use credit cards on the internet, then beware !!!
Also malware, adware, spyware, and misc, This is what not turning certain settings off can do... On your internet browsers (Firefox and Google Chrome), you can use WOT (Web of Trust), Adblock Plus, Flag, these are add on's...

I believe, that people with less savvy, should wait 6 or 8 months to let Microsoft get some of the bugs out and more updates. You can get Windows 10 free for 1 year from July 29, 2015 to July 29, 2016

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Ed Bott boots that idea.
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Want to see Windows 10 bugs? Here's the link.

Here's the MS forum for Windows 10 Insiders. If you want to see many, many bugs in it look here:
http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/insider/forum/insider_wintp-insiderplat_pc?sort=lastreplydate&dir=desc&tab=threads&status=all&mod=&modage=&advfil=&postedafter=&postedbefore=&threadtype=all&tm=1440170234298&auth=1

Personally I'm living with two bugs. On one system I get 0x80310052 errors, on another I can't access shared printers. When it comes to being spied on, I guess it depends on "what the meaning of is is". Mischief If you haven't gone into Settings->Privacy and looked at the 37 areas of things being sent back to MS from Windows 10 by default, you should. Most folks don't know about them and are shocked when informed. YMMV.

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The good news here is

That we have dozens of 10 upgrades done without any glitches. Or rather the times there was a problem it was "the same old thing" we ran into before. Drivers, outdated antivirus and such.

At least Ed Bott covers the spying angle well. There are folk that want to whip up a frenzy so you can't help those folk.

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I haven't seen Ed Bott or anybody explain these.

I said I'd counted 37 areas of concern in the Settings/Privacy part of Windows 10. I just went back and counted again. Now there are 47! I don't know if I just missed some earlier or some have been added since the last time I looked. I don't call these spyware, malware, or any of the hyperbolic other things, I call them snoopware. I'm listing these 47 below. I haven't seen MS, Ed Bott, or anybody else explain why folks shouldn't be concerned about them. Depending on what the meaning of "what is is" you could say they aren't spyware. OTOH my father, who was a lawyer, often lectured my brother and me that it's not enough to avoid wrong doing - you have the appearance of wrong doing. This list certainly doesn't avoid the appearance of wrong doing, and an understandable explanation to the contrary is sorely absent at the present time.
Here's that list:
1) Let apps use my advertising ID for experiences across apps.
2)Turn on SmartScreen Filter to check web content (URLs) that Windows Store apps use.
3) Send Microsoft info about how I write to help us improve typing and writing in the future.
4) Let websites provide locally relevnt content by accessing my language list.
5) If this setting is on, each person who signs in to this device can change their own location settings. ...
6) When location is on, the locations obtained to meet the needs of your apps and services will be stored for a limited time on the device. ...
7) Let apps use my camera.
8-12) Choose apps that can use your camera. 3D Builder, App connector, Food & Drink, Microsoft Edge, Onenote.
13) Microphone. Let apps use my microphone.
14-17) 3D Builder, MS Edge, Voice Recorder, Xbox.
1Cool Speech, Inking & Typing. "Get to know me".
19) Account Info. Let apps access my name, picture, and other account info.
20-22) Contacts. Chose apps that can access contacts. App connector, Mail and Calendar, Windows Shell Experience Host.
23-24) Calendar. Let apps access my calendar. App connector, Mail and Calendar.
25) Call History. Let apps acess my call history.
26) Email. Let apps access and send email.
27) Messaging. Let apps read or send messages (text or MMS)
2Cool Radios - Some apps use radios--like Bluetooth--in your device to send and receive data. Sometimes, apps need to turn these radios on and off to work their magic.
29) Sync with devices.
30) Use trusted devices. USB2.0-CRW.
31) Phone Companion.
32) Feedback frequency. Diagnostic and usage data.
33-47 Background apps. Let apps run in the background. Choose which apps can receive info, send notifications, and stay up-to-date, even when you're not using them. ... There are 15 of these.

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I'm surprised you run Windows at all.

Many of those concerns apply to prior versions. Maybe Windows, Android, iOS, OS X are not for you?

I think for you, a secure OS like TAILS OS is best.

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Maybe you are like Richard Stallman.
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Interesting article, but I just use 7, and on 10...

...which I run on 2 test computers, I turn all 47 of those "snoopware" switches off. I don't know about the RTM version, but on the Insiders versions every time you get a new build, you have to go back and turn a lot of those switches back off. Similarly with network settings. PITA.
I do use Linux on occasion, primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also to keep up with what's going with it. Linux has come a long way, but IMO it's got a way to go if it's to become good for the non-technical masses.

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There are folk

That love to get everyone worked up about anything. The move to more cloud means that a lot of these features have to store stuff in that cloud.

Here I use a local login, few cloud apps (Dropbox user here) and agree with Ed Bott and Richard Stallman.

If it wasn't for the fact that Windows apps make me money, I would follow RS's moves.

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Answer
Well having a non-touch

screen shouldn't be a deciding factor since Windows 10 is more non-touch friendly then even Windows 8.1.

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