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Should athletes who admit cheating lose awards won?

Greenwell bitter about losing '88 award to Canseco

FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) -- It was in 1988 that Mike Greenwell was runner-up in the American League MVP voting, and now he wants everyone to know why: Jose Canseco, who won the award, cheated.

Canseco's book released this week discussed his steroid use and named other players who he said used the substance that has been banned from baseball. His tainted success, Greenwell said Thursday, deprived other players of recognition and honors.


I think he's got a good point. Canseco has admitted in his book that he was cheating throughout his major league career. My feeling right now is that since he confessed, all of his awards should be taken back and given to the guy who came in 2nd that year, and maybe he should even have all of his stats expunged. Total home runs: 0. Total RBIs: 0. etc.

I suppose it may come down to when steroids were banned, but what do you think?
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(NT) (NT) Revisonist History

In reply to: Should athletes who admit cheating lose awards won?

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Wasn't cheating

In reply to: Should athletes who admit cheating lose awards won?

technically

Baseball had no rules relating to steroids. Granted steroids are illegal but there were no rules inplace forbidding them in baseball.

Although the award may be tainted there is no legal ground to take it away.

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(NT) (NT) How about yet more asterisks in the record books?

In reply to: Wasn't cheating

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Well if they can give Maris one for his record

In reply to: (NT) How about yet more asterisks in the record books?

than why not give them to the roided up monsters now?

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The Maris asterisk was removed.....

In reply to: Well if they can give Maris one for his record

...a number of years ago, sadly not until after he died, so he never got the satisfaction of seeing his achievement fully recognized.

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Just curious

In reply to: Wasn't cheating

Granted steroids are illegal but there were no rules inplace forbidding them in baseball.


While granting no explicit rules (and as a society we're in the process of rejecting most expectations of fair play and reasonableness), couldn't the fact of winning by doing something ILLEGAL be construed as wrong as something against the rule book? Shouldn't the rule book be rules for the game/sport IN ADDITION to not supplanting the laws of the land?

JMO

Roger

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com
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We're talking MLB here

In reply to: Just curious

The League that let Steve Howe "come back" 7 times from cocaine addiction.

The League that has one of the owners as commissioner.

Now get your damned Vulcan logic out here!

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(NT) (NT) Fair counter point, but not Vulcan, only twisted. LOL.

In reply to: We're talking MLB here

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If that were the practice

In reply to: Just curious

you could back a couple of buses up to the player's entrance of every football game in the country. How much of that behavior would be legal outside the sport's context.

"Sure I dragged him to the ground on Main Street, Your Honor, but it was a clean hit. I didn't clip him!"

Happy

Dan

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If they get to keep them

In reply to: Should athletes who admit cheating lose awards won?

does that mean that Pete Rose should finally be given the awards he actually EARNED and were denied to him AFTER he admitted wrong doing?

TONI

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Pete broke the rules of baseball

In reply to: If they get to keep them

What awards do you speak of?

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His gambling on baseball began after he stopped playing

In reply to: If they get to keep them

Therefore I don't see how his on-field achievements would have changed any.

I think he belongs in the Hall as a player.

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I completely agree

In reply to: His gambling on baseball began after he stopped playing

The commission has withheld the rewards/awards he actually earned and never got as extra punishment...while the whole time they have allowed actual 'criminals' who broke the laws of the land to continue to get up that ladder of recognition.

TONI

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(NT) (NT) what rewards/awards were with held?

In reply to: I completely agree

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Pete belongs in the Hall of Fame

In reply to: (NT) what rewards/awards were with held?

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But he agreed to Vincent's terms

In reply to: Pete belongs in the Hall of Fame

lifetime ban.

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I think the ban should remain in effect

In reply to: But he agreed to Vincent's terms

He could still be admitted into the Hall for his achievements, with a note about the ban and the reason for it included. In fact, it would serve as a good lesson for kids visiting the Hall, that cheating may have short-term benefits but will have long-term consequences, and that it's dishonorable.

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He is in the hall in that manner

In reply to: I think the ban should remain in effect

that have recognized his achievements they have displays of his bat(s), gloves, shoes, etc., he's just not in the players wing with a bust.

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While that may be true

In reply to: I completely agree

Enforcing civil law is not Baseball's jurisdiction, upholding the integrity of the game is. Aside from letting a guy play and not letting him play, Baseball does not have many meaningful options for enforcement. If Baseball had just fined this bum and left it at that it would have been a disservice and would not stand today as an example to instruct the behavior of the players.

Dan

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me to and what harm was betting?

In reply to: His gambling on baseball began after he stopped playing

im confused unless they think he would intentinally screw up to lose?

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Throw a game on purpose? ? ?

In reply to: me to and what harm was betting?

No one would ever do that!

</sarcasm>

Dan

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You're probably too young

In reply to: Throw a game on purpose? ? ?

to remember the infamous nine trials..........

Which was why the 'rule' was put in to begin with...however, Rose wasn't betting until after he stopped playing, if I remember correctly. He was still managing/coaching, maybe.

Which is why I think he should have been able to still get into the Hall Of Fame.....even with a lifetime banning for baseball itself. His record stood on his abilities not on something he did long after the fact.

TONI

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Pete Rose was managing the Cincinnati Reds....

In reply to: You're probably too young

....when he was betting on baseball. The evidence indicated that he was indeed betting on his own team -- to win. But it's just a small step from that to deliberately making some bad managerial decisions, e.g. leaving the starting pitcher in too long in order to ensure a loss you've bet on.

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oh yeah?

In reply to: Pete Rose was managing the Cincinnati Reds....

he was indeed betting on his own team -- to win. But it's just a small step from that to deliberately making some bad managerial decisions, e.g. leaving the starting pitcher in too long in order to ensure a loss you've bet on.

OK, Im driving 70 mph. Its just a small step from driving over 70, so I should be punished?
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If the speed limit is under 70, then YES

In reply to: oh yeah?

Gambling on baseball is illegal. Rose was never accused of trying to fix games and was only banned for the crimes he actually committed.

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Games in which he had a duty to perform

In reply to: If the speed limit is under 70, then YES

Since he allegedly betted on his own team, it looks to me like that wouldve been an additional incentive to win. That should be an exception to the rule.

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So breaking the law should be OK....

In reply to: Games in which he had a duty to perform

....if it adds to the incentive to win?

I guess that ends the whole steroid thing right there, doesn't it.

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(NT) (NT) Thats why in the 'real world' we have courts

In reply to: So breaking the law should be OK....

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But I know of them

In reply to: You're probably too young

Rose was still in Baseball. He was managing and betting on Baseball. Were it up to me he would be banned from going to see any MLB events, any minor league event, and watching any game played will ball and stick, either in person or on TV.

Dan

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well in a baseball game

In reply to: Throw a game on purpose? ? ?

unless its the pitcher kind of hard to do

but then baseball isnt a sport anymore its just a money maker

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