Question

Severe trouble connecting even with different modems

Hi

For the longest time now I have been experiencing serious connectivity issues with my home internet. We have 2 modems (by the same telecommunications provider) in the house. One is upstairs, one is downstairs. I naturally use the downstairs one as it is closer to me. However, all day long it just keeps disconnecting: when checking my network preferences panel on my computer, the ISP, Internet and server buttons either all go to yellow color or to red. The same happens when I switch to the upstairs modem. When it is really bad, I use my phone's hotspot to connect my computer to the internet. Sometimes that works well, but often even then I encounter the same problem mentioned above. I have heard of modems interfering with each other and sometimes causing such problems, but when I switch to hot spot using my phone (which is provided by another company than my home internet modems), why would the problem persist? Is it my computer? Sometime my wifi seems to work perfectly, on other days I experience literally hundreds of disconnects all day long, every few seconds, even when I am the only person in the house using the internet.

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Answer
bridging

are both modem cabled to the same ISP provider line? how?
If yes, you may have to manually disable DHCP on one of them. You usually would access modem with a computer on the network which access IP 192.168.1.1

Some test to perform if issue persist:
- disable modem B (unplug), connect to modem A
- disable modem A, connect to modem B
- test mobile data (4G) connection when closer to a window: some materials are heavily interfering with radio signal.

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Answer
Confusion of terminology

"Modem" means "modulator-demodulator" and just converts a signal from one type to another. Unless you were paying for two separate services, you'd only have one modem. Giving a brand and model of each device might help determine what these were and how they'd be used. Some of today's modems offer multiple functions such as DHCP/routing and wifi all in one bundle. And, why the need for a phone as a hot spot? That's not something folks need in a home that has their internet cabled to the home. That's only if you were connected on some cell tower grid. I suppose you could use your phone that way if your wifi was through your home hardware but there should be no reason to do so if your home hardware was functioning properly. I think there's some important information missing here as to what hardware you actually have and the topography of your home system.

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More details about the severe wifi issues I am experiencing

Hi Steven,

You are of course absolutely right. I did not mean modem, but router.
Sorry about the confusion.
This house is split into several units.
2 small studios downstairs, using the same router and one apartment upstairs, which I believe uses a second router.
The router I am using is right next to my room and there is only a slim plasterboard wall in between my room and that router.

In terms of wifi networks I am connected to the downstairs one as well as the upstairs one.
Sometimes the one upstairs works better sometimes the one downstairs seems to be better, sometimes both of them are useless.

Occasionally I have to use my phone’s (Verizon) hotspot for wifi for my computer as both wiw if networks in the house are failing me.

Using my phone’s wifi hotspot does sometimes help…however, even then (!) although the phone would be right next to my computer with the computer using my phone’s wifi, my wifi signal will be lost or become unreliable.
So in a nutshell, on some days it simply does not matter which wifi network I use, I simply cannot get a decent wifi connection at all.

I have attached various pictures and screen shots to show some of the things that are going on here.

https://ibb.co/album/n1y8MF

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Answer
Is this DSL connected internet?

If so, and the copper lines have static, then that will greatly affect your reception of internet. You can check phone lines by picking up a receiver, hit a single number, then listen for any static or crackly sounds.

Also get that plastic off the extender/access point, it needs to shed heat.

Looks like yours, it's an "wifi extender" aka Access Point.
https://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/wifi-range-extenders/EX6200.aspx

I also see you have a couple of these laying around. In use?

https://qresolve.wordpress.com/2015/02/26/enhance-your-networks-capabilities-with-these-best-5-wi-fi-boosters/


"D-Link DAP-1320

d link

The D-Link DAP-1320 is one of the smallest adapters available in the market, and its compact built makes it easier to place it in a multi-socket extension. The device measures 48 x 42 x 56 mm and it is an elegant piece of wireless connection that is gently curved from the front and features a single LED. The gadget gets ratings as a 300Mbps and uses only the 2.4GHz band to deliver seamless connectivity to your computing devices. The devices feature optimal simplicity and basic performance, but the side mounted WPS button allows it to connect to your router automatically. This Wi-Fi extender offers great performance at a price of $28 (price on Amazon) and it is one of the best choices if you want to extend your 2.4GHz wireless connection.

Key Features:

Delivers excellent 2.4Ghz performance
Wi-Fi ratings up to N300
Simple yet compact design
Easy to set up, easy to use
"

Post was last edited on September 18, 2019 2:15 PM PDT

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Thank you for your advice

Thank you dear James, you're a gentleman for giving me all these tips.
I have removed the plastic sheet off the back of the extender/access point.

Your point about a DSL/ landline connection is good, however, we do not have a phone line here as far as I know. This is a brand new house and perhaps the owner didn't bother setting up a phone line since most folks use cell phones these days. In any case, I never saw a phone socket anywhere in the house, nor a land line phone. If the access point outside my room is just a "wifi extender" would that mean that there is a 'main' router somewhere in the house and this wifi extender only serves to boost that main router's signal?

I love your D-Link DAP-1320 tip, will definitely look into it. Actually, I think what you may have seen in the pictures are a couple of those night time lights you can plug into a wall outlet to illuminate the hallway. Somebody had unplugged them and left them next to the access point, but I do agree they look a little like the D-Link DAP-1320 model.

Again, thank you so very much for writing such a detailed reply. Please do let me know if you have any additional thoughts.

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seems to be only an extender (access point)
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Maybe are wifi powerline devices
"Somebody had unplugged them and left them next to the access point, but I do agree they look a little like the D-Link DAP-1320 model."

Seems a bit suspicious they left them next to the extender doesn't it? They do have an LED in them, so maybe they also look like a night light. I would look for another device like a router somewhere.
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3 networks- none of them work well

Hi James,

Yes, I know, kind of weird them laying next to the extender.

The strange thing is, that I have access to 3 separate networks. I can connect my computer's internet to 2 networks (I had always assumed that the thing next to my room is a proper router- not just an extender) and that there was a second independent router upstairs. However, that may not be the case. As you said, there is only an extender next to my room and maybe there is only one router in the house, with 1 network. Maybe the second network is from a neighboring house (which also belongs to my landlord though). However, the absolute weirdest part is, that I can use my phone as a router, by using the hotspot function. But even THAT does not work properly- I experience constant slow downs and disconnections. So I have 3 networks and NONE of them work! Could there be something wrong with my computer??

Even when I am on my Verizon (phone) netwrok, all the time I get disconnected. The diagnostics tool constantly shows either the ISP on yellow or even red or all 3 Isp, internet and server on yellow or red.
I have the phone on hotspot mode, close to my computer. So now the computer should be running on the Verizon Wifi network via my phone (which, as mentioned, is often the only way i can have any internet here!) and it still not working reliably. This is insane.

Post was last edited on September 24, 2019 4:20 PM PDT

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D-Link DAP-1320 not helping

Hi James,

I purchased and set up a D-Link DAP-1320 model but unfortunately it is not making any difference. My connection problems are worse than ever. I think I will have to ask an internet provider company to set me up with my own connection and router, which will not be shared.

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