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SATA vs GSATA (Gigabyte SATA)?

by andyw9999 / February 20, 2008 8:40 AM PST

Just bought a new mobo - Gigabyte GA-MA790FX-DS5
(spec here: http://www.giga-byte.co.uk/Products/Motherboard/Products_Overview.aspx?ProductID=2694 )

There are six SATA ports on the mobo:
4 x SATA II (orange ports - manual states: AMD SB600 controller)
2 x GSATA II (purple ports - 'Gygabyte SATA')

Manual quotes smae transfer rates and RAID setup but gives no indication as to why there are the two different SATA controllers!

Anyone know what if any diferences there are i.e. are there situations when use of one type benefits over the other??..........I guess there must be else why the two setups?!

Thanks

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Believe these are just RAID capable
by Steven Haninger / February 20, 2008 10:17 AM PST

Generally you can configure these as standard ports or for RAID 0 or 1. They will need a different controller and driver. These are capable of building a RAID array. These are becoming more popular but they do have a down side. I don't think these ports can be used for CD ROMs, DVDs and such but they do add expansion capability or RAID capability if you want it. If you configure a RAID array and want to load Windows on it, you will need to pre-install RAID drivers. If you use a RAID array as a secondary drive, you do not. Hope that helps.

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Not G for gagabytes but G-tech.
by ahtoi / February 20, 2008 4:10 PM PST

Capable of 135MB/sec transfer rate which doesn't seem that exceptional to me. There was a mention about sopport for multi-streams (what ever that means).

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Update...
by andyw9999 / February 21, 2008 8:36 PM PST

This is what Gigabyte Support had to say (not a lot!):

<i>Both controller are the same support SATA 3Gb/s devices. The main different is AMD SB600 Support for SATA RAID 0, RAID 1 and RAID 0+1. GIGABYTE SATA2 chip Support for SATA RAID 0, RAID 1, and JBOD.</i>

JBOD? :shrug:

2 HDs and DVDRW attached to 3 'standard' SATA ports

Looks like a possible benefit of having 2 SATA controllers is that I could attach my 2nd HD to a GSATA port and configure that controller for AHCI (http://www.pcw.co.uk/personal-computer-world/features/2166825/joys-sata)

Not after any RAID setup just best performance w/o too much hassle....probably just leave as is!

Thanks for replies.

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JBOD
by Steven Haninger / February 21, 2008 11:06 PM PST
In reply to: Update...

means Just a Bunch of Disks. RAID has it's geeky side.

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