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Same Problem as Becca

by redhottermite / July 19, 2004 6:09 AM PDT

Hi, Everyone... This is my first post and first time here. I seem to have the exact same problem as Becca had.. I searched for solutions and i found this thread.. however I tried the solutions you all so kindly suggested and to no avail. I am on my boyfriends computer and since he is completely computer illerate i am asked to install programs and whatnot... today i am trying to install some of his games and such and i keep getting the recurring message " C:/WINDOWS/System32/AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable for running MS-DOS and microsoft Windows Applications." It is labled a 16bit subsystem error...now i am not much more literate then my boyfriend, but i just dont know what to do....can you please help me?

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''Compatibility''?
by Cursorcowboy / July 19, 2004 9:05 AM PDT
In reply to: Same Problem as Becca
today i am trying to install some of his games and such and i keep getting the recurring message " C:/WINDOWS/System32/AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable for running MS-DOS and microsoft Windows Applications." It is labled a 16bit subsystem error...

1. Please note that just above the text editor (where you enter a question on the forum) is the following paragraph, and if certain information is not present in your question, our reply may not be very helpful:

Tip: If you are asking for help to troubleshoot a computer-related problem, please be sure to include all the necessary information (ie: operating system, model number, hardware, software, etc) that will help others identify your problem for a speedy resolution.

a. Always give software names and versions if you're able to make the determination.

b. Describe when errors are generated and give accurate error information exactly as it was reflected on the screen.

c. Since you describe another member's message and followed certain steps, what was done and what did you discover?

Note: Since there is little if anything in your question to work with even though I suspect the OS is WinXP, perhaps the software being used is not compatible. . . .

2. The article [Q286705] explains that the Windows Application Compatibility (WAC) mode provides an environment for running programs that closely reflects the behavior of earlier Windows operating systems. When used, many of the most common issues that prohibit earlier versions of programs from working correctly are resolved. When running a program and it does not function as expected, it may however operate properly when run in one of the compatibility environments.

Note: XP includes technology to dynamically apply compatibility fixes for programs that are not designed to run on it. Compatibility fixes are provided to assist an earlier version of a program in avoiding any issues that may arise because of the changes in this operating system. These compatibility fixes may be used individually or in ready-to-use groups called compatibility layers. These layers have been defined for several commonly encountered configurations. Please read through, "Using Program Compatibility Mode."

3. "Setup Restarts the Computer Without Warning That Other Users Are Logged On (Q298311)."

Note: When installing a program not Fast User Switching aware, users in other sessions may lose data when the program automatically restarts.

4. The article [Q324767] explains that when trying to start or install an MS-DOS-based or a 16-bit Windows-based program on your Windows XP-based computer, you may receive an error message that is similar to one of the following and may occur if one or more of the following files are missing or damaged:

Config.nt
Autoexec.nt
Command.com

16-bit MS-DOS Subsystem
path to the program that you are trying to start or install C:\Winnt\System32\config.nt
The system file is not suitable for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications.
Choose 'Close' to terminate the application.

16-bit MS-DOS Subsystem
path to the program that you are trying to start or install config.nt
The system file is not suitable for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications.
Choose 'Close' to terminate the application.

16-bit MS-DOS Subsystem
path to the program that you are trying to start or install C:\Windows\System32\Autoexec.nt
The system file is not suitable for running MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows applications.
Choose 'Close' to terminate the application.


5. If possible, use Shims [Qfixapp.exe] to quickly apply various program fixes to determine their effectiveness. Qfixapp.exe reads the %SystemRoot%\Windows\Apppatch\Sysmain.sdb database to produce a list of available fixes and when selecting AppFix a program executable (.exe) files will be started and apply a fix -- if a suitable AppFix is found, the tool eventually helps generate and test matching file information, [Q294416].

6. Supplemental reading:

a. "HOW TO Use Windows Program Compatibility Mode (Q292533)."

b. "Description of the Application Compatibility Toolkit 2.0 for Windows XP (Q294895)."

c. "How to Determine If Hardware or Software Is Compatible with Windows XP (Q295322)."

d. "HOW TO: Use the Program Compatibility Wizard (Q301911)."

e. "HOW TO Use Compatibility Administration Tool in Windows XP (Q304530)."
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Re: Same Problem as Becca
by becca73 / July 21, 2004 7:45 AM PDT
In reply to: Same Problem as Becca

Hi,redhottermite. I'll list everything I did so maybe it will help you. I don't claim to be an expert, and if someone offers better advice, take it. This is just
what I did, and it worked for me.

Go to Start/Search/Tools/Folder Options/View and Check
"Show Hidden Files", and Uncheck "Hide Extensions...."
and "Hide Protected Operating files"
yes/apply/ok to confirm.

Then, search for autoexec.nt (Be sure your search confirms it is looking in hidden files and folders.)
Let the search complete before you click on anything else.
When finished, you should have a copy of autoexec.nt in
WINDOWS/System32 and
WINDOWS/Driver Cache/i386.
You may also have one that shows up in WINDOWS/repair
If they are not in these places or if you open them with Notepad and find them blank, then you need to
use the sfc tool.
**(From reading your post, I guess that you have probably already run the sfc; but just in case you haven't Go to Start/Run and type sfc/ scannow
Insert the XP disc if prompted. If you are asked what to do, just exit, and let the disc do the rest for about 10 minutes. After it stops, remove the disk, and go back and check the autoexec.nt files again.)

You will need to go to the legitimate copy of autoexec.nt that you have in repair or WINDOWS, or
System32, right click on it to copy and paste it where
it needs to be, whether it be WINDOWS/system32 or WINDOWS/Driver Cache/i386

You then need to follow the exact steps for the file
config.nt (copying and pasting accordingly).
I kept getting the error message when trying to install
AVG (anti-virus); After I fixed the problem, I removed
the incomplete downloaded version of AVG and reinstalled it with no problem.

**Are you only getting the error message with these games or is it any time you open a file with DOS command? If it is just with games, check the compatibility like Cursorcowboy suggested.
(A way to test this is to navigate to C:/WINDOWS
and find the file named memory test MSDOS, click on it.
If you get the autoexec.nt error message, then it is confirmed that autoexec.nt and/or config.nt need repair.)

There is one other option that can be tried if you go through these steps and your problem is not fixed, which would involve doing a manual repair by editing
the contents of autoexec.nt and config.nt files (expanding etc.) I used the Microsoft article on this problematic error message as a guide. (Following the advice straight from the Microsoft article did not work! And, I had to modify some steps. I have since done this to my friend's computer, and it was successful. I could list the steps for that procedure for you, if all else fails, but then someone in the forum may frown upon the
advice because I'm not a moderator or computer expert.
Like I said, it worked for me, but, if better advice comes along take it.

I hope you get your problem fixed! Believe me, I know it has been a pain!!!!
Becca

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Re: Same Problem as Becca
by Cursorcowboy / July 21, 2004 10:10 PM PDT
I used the Microsoft article on this problematic error message as a guide. (Following the advice straight from the Microsoft article did not work! And, I had to modify some steps. I have since done this to my friend's computer, and it was successful. I could list the steps for that procedure for you, if all else fails, but then someone in the forum may frown upon the advice because I'm not a moderator or computer expert.

Good post. Not sure which guide you're referring to but it doesn't really matter. It also wouldn't matter to anyone -- member or not -- whether you state along the lines that you used information from . . . (including the URL or a hyperlink) and describe the process used or modification to overcome something which wasn't entirely correct in referenced material. That's how we all learn.
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