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General discussion

Replacing a C: Drive

by ph1773 / November 22, 2010 11:24 PM PST

I have a desktop running Windows XP version 5.1.2600 service pack 3 build 2600. I want to replace the C: Drive and would like to know what the best method is. Also, drives F: and G: were set-up for gaming but are no longer used.

System Manufacturer INTEL_
System Model PRODUCT3
System Type X86-based PC
Processor x86 Family 15 Model 2 Stepping 9 GenuineIntel ~2600 Mhz
BIOS Version/Date Intel Corp. BZ87510A.86A.0093.P22.0402241027, 2/24/2004
SMBIOS Version 2.3

Virtual Memory: 2 GB

Item Value
Drive A:
Description 3 1/2 Inch Floppy Drive

Drive C:
Description Local Fixed Disk
Compressed No
File System NTFS
Size 74.52 GB (80,015,491,072 bytes)
Free Space 13.07 GB (14,028,722,176 bytes)
Volume Name
Volume Serial Number 908F9E5F

Drive D:
Description CD-ROM Disc

Drive E:
Description CD-ROM Disc

Drive F:
Description Local Fixed Disk
Compressed No
File System NTFS
Size 65.98 GB (70,844,301,312 bytes)
Free Space 61.99 GB (66,561,921,024 bytes)
Volume Name Games
Volume Serial Number 38756E53

Drive G:
Description Local Fixed Disk
Compressed No
File System NTFS
Size 123.94 GB (133,076,770,816 bytes)
Free Space 64.06 GB (68,782,374,912 bytes)
Volume Name Backup
Volume Serial Number E4773A66

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Best method...
by PKsteven / November 23, 2010 2:14 AM PST
In reply to: Replacing a C: Drive

depends what you mean by "replace". Replace the "physical drive" by taking it out and putting in a new one? Or do you mean re-install the operating system? Take out CD-ROM drives and replace them too?

If you mean take out the drive completely, there is only ONE method. Remove it,put another in. They type, SATA or PATA depends on your system. There are a lot of "guesses" to be made so I will wait until you clarify and give some specs on your system.

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Best Method
by ph1773 / November 23, 2010 5:21 AM PST
In reply to: Best method...

I'd like to replace the C: hard drive. Other than the information I've already provided what else do you require? I have the knowledge to physically replace the C: drive but I don't know what is the best way to copy/store the data on the current C: drive then move it to the new C: drive.

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There isn't one
by Jimmy Greystone / November 23, 2010 10:33 PM PST
In reply to: Best Method

There isn't one is the problem. Generally speaking, you can only back up data, you can't back up programs or operating systems. With Windows, this is by design. The upside is that it's a great opportunity to get rid of some program you haven't used in 6+ months, but couldn't bring yourself to uninstall. Not to mention all the other crap that can build up over time.

Back up the data you don't want to lose (which you should be doing regularly anyway) then just put in the new drive, and start installing everything. I'd first do the OS and security updates, then move onto the rest. Bigger programs first, so if something goes wrong, less time is invested into the whole process if you need to scrap it and start over.

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what is the manf and model
by wb2001 / November 23, 2010 5:07 AM PST
In reply to: Replacing a C: Drive

What is the make and model of this XP machine. Subjective question is your C:F:G: drives. Is that physically one drive, or three inside the case? I suspect it's actually 1 drive with 3 separate partitions.

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C, F and G drives Mfg and Model
by ph1773 / November 23, 2010 9:56 PM PST

The desktop was built by an individual, not a manufacturer. Below is the drive information that I pulled from the System Info file. I can pop the case off this evening to get the actual mfg and model numbers of each drive. To answer your question there are there separate physical hard disks. We no longer use the F drive for gaming and I'm not certain what's on the G drive. If the C drive is using 61 Gb and the F drive space can be freed up could I move or Ghost or back-up or whatever method the data from the C drive to the F drive with the OS, replace the C drive then place the OS and data onto this new drive?

I should have mentioned why I'm attempting to do this. This desktop has gotten progressively unresponsive over time. Defrag and other Windows disk management and clean-up tools have not helped. Boot-up time is not too bad (two to three minutes) but the responsiveness of logging on as a user (there are 4 active logons, opening and running programs like Windows Word, Excel and Quicken. The loading of pages is also taking more time now that in the past. This machine was built in '04.

Drive A:
3 ? Floppy

Drive C:
Size 74.52 GB
Free 13.07 GB
No Volume Name
Model: WDC WD800Jd-00HKA0

Drive D:
CD ROM Disc

Drive E:
CD ROM Disc

Drive F:
Size 65.98 GB
Free 61.99 GB
Volume Name: Games
Model: Not Known

Drive G:
Size 123.94 GB
Free 64.06 GB
Volume Name: Backup
Model: Maxtor 6Y200P0

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The info needed
by wb2001 / November 24, 2010 1:27 AM PST

Thank you for adding the info needed to actually answer you questions. I will offer some insights I have learned.

1) Muti-users logon-ins create an issue called "memory leakage", where memory is not released when the user logs off. Microsoft recommends a re-boot when this happens.
2) The small drives suggest a limitation pre-dating the XP OS. Maybe this machine had 98 OS prior with the 128BG limit. See this: http://www.hexff.com/w98_hd.php
3) run this program: http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html It will totally analyze your computer without opening the case. Print out the report. It will list your MOBO, RAM, slots, cards, software COA keys, installed programs, and much more.
4) Suggest you check with, and run "check my system" at: http://www.4allmemory.com/

Because your machine is a "build", you'll need to research whether a newer BIOS is available for that MOBO. (Not for the faint-of heart experience). It can be tricky.

My answer, being cost effective:
If you can add memory (cheaply), then do so. I would guess your machine is PC100/133 memory. The machine might even be limited to only 512MB max. (See #4).
Check that G drive, it's larger, and a more viable drive to clone your C:

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that maxtor dive is a 200GB
by wb2001 / November 24, 2010 1:32 AM PST
In reply to: The info needed
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Another good program to tell you about the hardware
by VAPCMD / November 24, 2010 2:22 AM PST
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You mention that you DO have the knowledge ...
by Edward ODaniel / November 24, 2010 2:22 AM PST
In reply to: Replacing a C: Drive

to physically replace the Western Digital C: drive but you "don't know what is the best way to copy/store the data on the current C: drive then move it to the new C: drive".

The easiest way to accomplish your aims is to simply make use of the software that comes with the new drive to clone the old drive to the new drive. If you replace the Western Digital drive with a Seagate or Maxtor drive they provide DiskWizard which is a slightly cripples version of Acronis True Image to make cloning the old drive to the new one easy and DiskWizard allows you to easily extend the partition sizing so a smaller drive makes full use of a larger drive.

Cloning allows you to replace the drive then boot the computer into the same OS and user accounts you are already familiar with and does not require the re-installation of any applications.

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