Auto Repair - Roadshow forum

Question

Repair shop didnt fix the problem

I took my car to a repair shop because I was having idling issues and rpms fluctuating while driving, they charged me $105 for a diagnostic fee then told me that I had several vacuum leaks, they ended up replacing vacuum hoses in engine compartment and vacuum lines to the intake runner assembly and charged me $524 including the diagnostic fee, and when i picked up the car I was having the exact same problems I was before and when i called back they said to drive it around more, which I did, and then he named something else and said that could possibly be the problem and said that the work they did was a "start" to findng the problem, and that i would need to bring the car back in for them to work on it more, and charge me again, wouldnt the diagnostic told him if there was another problem? I need any help i can get, Thanks

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All Answers

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Answer
go to autozone

In reply to: Repair shop didnt fix the problem

Have them give you a list of engine code errors which they will do free for you using an OBD device hooked to your car. That should give you some idea of what the problem is. Drop those codes here and we can look them up and get some ideas of what's wrong perhaps. RPM's flux while driving could be low fuel pump pressure from one that's failiing, or blockage in fuel lines (usually failing rubber hoses losing inside chunks that alcohol in fuel corrodes off them), or something ignition, or one of the sensors failing. The most common failure of sensor that causes that condition is the MAP or the manifold absolute pressure sensor. They have a thin metal film in them which measures the flex or stress and converts that to digital data which is then fed to the car's computer system. One way to check that is to disconnect the wires to that sensor and without hard driving, just slowly increases on speed, check to see if the fluxing of rpm's stops. If so, then that would definitely be an item needing replacing.

Some links for knowledge gain.

https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/symptoms-of-a-bad-or-failing-manifold-absolute-pressure-sensor-map-sensor

http://knowhow.napaonline.com/what-is-a-map-sensor/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAP_sensor

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Ill check the sensor today ehen i get home

In reply to: go to autozone

The only code Ive had was a po431 (bank 2 catalytic convert) which I had got the cat replaced then the light came back on a month later so I've just been driving it with that code and its been about 5 months since its been on. Also had some misfire codes but I think that problem has been solved

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Answer
I hate to write it but no. Diagnostics are great, nice but

In reply to: Repair shop didnt fix the problem

Rarely tell you exactly what to fix all the time. Vacuum leaks can cause what you noted but it could be more than that. I would be guessing but my bet is this car has a lot of miles (over 150K?) and time isn't kind to hoses. Finding a good mechanic or shop is rough.

Also I know my shop, trust them but repairs to me always seem to run from cheap to wow. Examples?
Car wouldn't start, The starter motor didn't even click. 80 bucks for a hard to replace piece of plastic on the clutch pedal that enabled the starting system.
Next time it was our high mileage Civic. Front end parts were worn and short of failure. 750USD later. Well it does steer like new!

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Car has 140k

In reply to: I hate to write it but no. Diagnostics are great, nice but

I imagine a hose or 2 needed to be replaced but I feel like they didnt need to replace all the ones they did just to charge more.

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Actually at that mileage and age?

In reply to: Car has 140k

I did that to my 1986 Chevy S10 in 1993 because we weren't sure which hose had failed. This hoses get iffy with age so a good mechanic and shop will replace them all because even if you replaced only the failed hose, the others are aged and eventually will fail meaning a return to the shop which is not good for you or the shop.

So yes, I think I disagree with those that want just the one failed vacuum line replaced. 140K is a lot of miles so for us it's just making payments to keep it running.

That is, I'm sure you've heard this. Once you pay off the car, you get to pay once in a while to keep it running. For me this is usually less than the new car payments.

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Wouldn't they of checked more

In reply to: Actually at that mileage and age?

When I took the car to them the main issue was the rpms fluctuating while driving below 50 mph, and when i called them back about the same problem, he named something else that could be wrong, shouldnt they of went ahead and checked for more problems that would cause the rpms fluctuating? Like checking the part he told me while they were already working on the car to fix the main problem.

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You have to ask them.

In reply to: Wouldn't they of checked more

Did they road test it with you after? Diagnostics and all that is great stuff but my lesson is it only takes you so far.

PS. Another thought. Such work can fix it then quickly fail as humans can make mistakes. Like the vacuum lines were replaced and then just a few miles one comes unplugged for many reasons. It's annoying to everyone involved but happens.

Post was last edited on December 20, 2017 10:41 AM PST

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No

In reply to: You have to ask them.

They did a road test when they first got the car. If I told them to fix the problem shouldnt they off done more?

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As noted below.

In reply to: No

Only one last test required. Them and you doing the road test after the fix to show it was fixed. I've had such misses before and I drive out, go huh, not fixed and drive back in. If I delay they may want to add more work and charges. Lesson learned long ago.

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Damn

In reply to: As noted below.

Do you think if I was to contact a higher ranking person like a manger or superintendent they could help?

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I rarely have to.

In reply to: Damn

I find the sooner I get back to the shop the louder the noise is. I know some folk are "in a hurry" and by not driving it back to the shop minutes after you leave you lose that golden time where they are "Ooops, we'll check our work."

I can't answer how this shop works. Sometimes the manager is worse as it may be their job to maximize the bottom line. I don't want to take it like that's all of the folk in shops. Most are better than that.

That said, I did have to escalate a new car issue to H___da America since the dealer was lost as to the problem. Sadly it turned out to be a product defect which went to court but outside of HA not giving the dealer the full story the dealer actually did what they could. Sadly my last new H....da. Lost me over that one.

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Eratic RPM

In reply to: Wouldn't they of checked more

Hi, Jose; All of the below is sound advise. I've also seen faulty EGR valves that open too soon or open too far or the diaphragm ruptured, causing a vacuum leak. This is an easy test. Disconnect the vacuum line going to the EGR valve and plug it off. Then go for a drive.
Good luck.
Loren

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