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Recommendations for new desktop PC to replace old one

I would like to get some recommendations on a new desktop PC to buy to replace an eleven year old Dell Dimension 3100 desktop PC with Windows XP. For example how much memory a new desktop PC should have; HD size; and whether to go with Windows 7 or Windows 10?

I'll be doing some web surfing on it while I use it; some Quicken; word processing and email. I'm not a gamer nor will I be downloading pictures. For basic computing needs could I get by with an i3 processor or should I consider an i5 processor? Should I stay with Dell or are other brands worth considering?


Big Steve
09/01/17

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Desktop

In reply to: Recommendations for new desktop PC to replace old one

For your needs an I3 will be fine.
4GB of ram should be fine, 8GB won't hurt.
Some 500GB hdd or ssd should work.
A ssd would be nice.
OS?....I'd go for w10.

Brand?
Shop around and read the reviews on the models you find.

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Re: Desktop

In reply to: Desktop

Thanks for the advice. Do you know anything about Lenovo desktop PC's? Are they as good as or better than Dell's desktop PC's? Would you buy a new desktop PC from Amazon.com; not from a third party reseller on Amazon.com but directly from Amazon.com or not?

I've looked at Inspiron and XPS desktop PC's on Dell.com; an Inspiron model would probably meet my needs; what size power supplies do most of these entry level models sold by computer manufacturers have if you would know? Thanks again.


Big Steve
09/01/17

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Desktop

In reply to: Re: Desktop

I don't have any opinion on brands.
You find a machine that fits your needs and then read the reviews.
As for where to buy it you check the return policy and warranty.
A local merchant is nice in that you'll get to look at the machine before you buy.

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Re: Desktop

In reply to: Desktop

Thanks for the feedback.


Big Steve
09/01/17

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Frankly? Just get one of these.

In reply to: Recommendations for new desktop PC to replace old one

Post was last edited on September 1, 2017 11:05 AM PDT

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Re: Frankly? Just get one of these.

In reply to: Frankly? Just get one of these.

I already have a new Dell laptop; I need a new desktop to replace my 11 year old Dell Dimension 3100 Windows XP machine. Bob what's the power supply size if you had to guess in those budget Dell desktop computers Dell's selling now?

Less than 200 watts? I guess I could Google the Dell Inspiron desktop PC model number I'm looking at on Dell.com to find out because Dell.com doesn't say what size their power supply is.


Big Steve
09/01/17

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I don't know. Why?

In reply to: Re: Frankly? Just get one of these.

We haven't bought a desktop for the office, home in 9 years. If Dell won't tell, I can't answer either.

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Re: I don't know. Why?

In reply to: I don't know. Why?

Just curious. No problemo Bob.


Big Steve
09/01/17

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Folks have asked us why no more desktops at the office.

In reply to: Re: I don't know. Why?

Mostly because the laptops cost very little today. Witness that killer deal I shared. It was 123.84 to the office door. Tax, shipping and product. This one may be a few dollars more but it's a ProBook model so a lot better built than the Inspiron laptops. It also includes a new battery.

Tip: If you buy this, go ahead and see if the old battery is in good shape. Out of the 2 we have, one had 16 per cent wear and the other zero per cent (new condition.) So we have 2 new batteries in the store room now.

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Re: Folks have asked us why no more desktops at the office.

In reply to: Folks have asked us why no more desktops at the office.

I've always had a desktop computer in my bedroom office on a real wood desk which is connected to a monitor; an inkjet printer; a wired keyboard and a mouse; etc. but I'm also thinking about pitching my 15" KDS CRT color monitor which I bought at an Office Depot in Katy, Texas in September 2005 where I was forced to evacuated to from here during Hurricane Katrina.

I didn't own a laptop at the time but my brother did bring me an old Windows 98 beige desktop computer which I set up in this hotel suite I stayed in for 29 days and kept up with what was going on back home in Mississippi. The hotel offered free internet and nationwide LD and I used both a lot.

The old KDS monitor is about to go; not to mention it's heavy. I haven't looked at a replacement monitor for that one yet; probably buy an LED monitor; 22" maybe. I'll have to go look at some of those to make sure I don't buy something too large for my desk.


Big Steve
09/01/17

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Suggestion

In reply to: Recommendations for new desktop PC to replace old one

You've had a computer for a long time and, by now, I'd have to guess you have a fairly good idea of what you expect from a replacement. You also know your budget. If at all possible, consider looking for a local custom builder who's been in the neighborhood a while. You'll get a PC that's full of proprietary parts...nor will it be loaded with a lot of applications, utilities and "trialware" that menaces you to buy the full version and is difficult to make go away. Many such places have relationships with small businesses, schools, churches, etc., and will do a good job. A shop like this that offers a good warranty doesn't want you to be coming back for repairs and will know what manufacturers produce the most reliable components. If some component fails after the warranty period, you won't need to go back to Dell or some brand name company for replacement parts. Tell them what you use a computer for and what sort of performance you expect and they'll work with you to make you happy.

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Still my favorite method for a desktop. Build it.

In reply to: Suggestion

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Same here

In reply to: Still my favorite method for a desktop. Build it.

but I know that it's not for the cost savings but for the control of the process. VARs can get the same parts cheaper than I can and sell a system for no more what I'd pay for the parts. They'll also know what parts tend to come back to the shop broken.

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Re: Suggestion

In reply to: Suggestion

There is one computer repair shop here in my city; the owner who's been in business for about 20 years also custom builds desktop PC's and I might go talk to him before I buy something from a big box retailer or purchase something online.

I guess he's the kind of guy who buys his parts from a place like New Egg or somebody else then he custom builds his computers to customer requests or what he recommends to a customer he would build. He's built and maintains all of the computers at my dentist's office who has told me the guy is good.


Big Steve
09/01/17

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Build

In reply to: Re: Suggestion

My local pc shop charges $100 labor to build a machine.
I just put the parts I want on paper and hand them the paper.
That way I get exactly what I want.

If your looking to save money and can compromise a little watch the sales on pre-builts.
I see machines come up on sales that I can't buy the parts for what their selling the machine for.

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Re: Build

In reply to: Build

I'll have to check to see what the guy at the computer repair shop will charge me to custom build a desktop computer. Unfortunately I can't walk into his store with a list of parts to use because I don't have a clue what all goes into building a custom rig. Thanks for your feedback.


Big Steve
09/02/17

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Talk to the guy

In reply to: Re: Build

Tell them what you want to do with the machine and what your budget is.
See what they come up with.
It would be kind of nice to see what the case looks like.
The innards might be great but if you can't stand to look at it and it's sitting on your desk that's not going to work very well.

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Can't beat a good recommendation!

In reply to: Re: Suggestion

At least, it's a very good place to start! And if you don't know what goes into a custom build, it will be a good learning process discussing what you want to do and see how your man translates that into components.

I haven't bought a desktop for years but I d like having one that I can upgrade as needs (mostly data!) frow. I have an HP ML110 G2 server that I bought new from HP on a promotion and upgraded to a desktop. That does make a point, though, I've generally found that business class machines are more reliable than consumer grade and things like the PSU you are worrying about will be appropriate to the configuration.

I've nor used a Lenovo desktop but I do have a bunch of Lenovo Thinkpad T-series laptops and the build quality is excellent. From what I've seen, I get the same impression about the Thinkcentre desktops. Always worth checking the manufacturers' sites, especially at end of financial year - here in Australia, Lenovo seem to have a continuous series of sales, the immediate previous model prices are very good value. They aren't the prettiest machines on the shelf, though!

Another source of good machines at reasonable prices are manufacturer refurbished machines, as good as new, tested to the same standards as new. Or if you are feeling a little bolder, you could look at ex-lease machines, four of my laptops were ex-lease or refurbs. To put that in context, my best deal was an ex-lease T500 in pristine condition, for AUD 39 - it cost more to ship it! Running OpenSuSE Linux, it's been faultless in daily use for two years as my primary machine.

Just a few mode ideas to think about.

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Don't go cheap!

In reply to: Recommendations for new desktop PC to replace old one

Unless you only have a couple of hundred, don't get a cheap computer. Not only do you get poor performance (soon to wish you had better) but you get cheap components too - as in more likely to fail sooner than later. In all the repair work I've done for friends, relatives, co-workers, their friends, etc. I've never had to repair an expensive computer - as in $800 & up. I love Wal-Mart computers (especially HPs) only because I've made a lot of money repairing them!
Second, unless you need mobility, stick with a desktop. You'll get more performance for the money than a laptop, and if anything does need repairing or upgrading, it's simple versus a laptop.
Lastly, I buy mostly Dells. The XPS 8300 I'm using here is 6 years old and I've had zero problems. A few years ago I upgraded to a SSD. Fantastic!

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Re: Don't go cheap!

In reply to: Don't go cheap!

For just a tower; I wouldn't want to pay $800.00 USD for one. So you've gotten good service out of your Dell XPS desktop PC; I guess the XPS desktops are built with better parts than the Inspirons are; Dell's entry level line of desktop PC's. Thanks for the feedback.


Big Steve
09/02/17

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Tip: Check out Groupon.

In reply to: Re: Don't go cheap!

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