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Quick tune in CBC if you can get it, there's a new programme

called Little Mosque on the Prairie. Takes place in a church basement where the Muslims have been given space for their mosque. A girl wants to go on a 10 k run so she starts out wearing normal girl attire with abdomen exposed (it's a ploy she's already discussed with a girlfriend on the phone). Her father says, "Go put something on, you look like a Protestant !" She says, "Don't you mean a prostitute?" He says, "No, I mean a Protestant." They finally compromise on a track suit and a hoodie (do they call hooded sweatshirts "hoodies" in the US yet?). He uncovers her head and says, "But don't cover up your beautiful hair, you don't have to do that until your first menses." She says, "Ewww, don't gross me out !"

So far its very funny, and is centered around using boards from the Hockey arena to build a wall to separate the men from the women in the "mosque". (Not from the Koran, not done in the mosque in Mecca.} The imam is new, hip, happening, and young and would rather not have this change, the older men are traditional, the women are split, mostly along age and education lines, one of them is the town doctor, of course.

It's very, very funny. And Canadians revere Lucy Maude Montgomery (Anne of Green Gables), not Laura Ingalls Wilder, but in my experience wouldn't pass up the chance to have a joke at Lucy M's expense either. They make fun of hockey and Don Cherry (think a short Don Meredith, on PCP and with a fractured sense of English and Pimp clothes, but commenting on hockey. I thought he was a comedian for the first couple of games until they told me he's like that in real life too.). All the time.

Rob

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sounds like "bend it like beckham"

In reply to: Quick tune in CBC if you can get it, there's a new programme

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Yeah, inter-cultural comedy, though the jokes were mostly

In reply to: sounds like "bend it like beckham"

among the Muslims. The wall between the men and women in the "mosque" was the serious issue, and opinions on the Muslim side were split. The whole separation of men and women concept is one common to at least two Middle Eastern religions, and was probably part of early Christianity too, though I can't speak to that, since I haven't read or heard anything about it.

It's enjoyable to see serious issues being treated with normal irreverence, and thus de-fused to a degree. It took me years to let go enough to enjoy this sort of "everything's on the table for satiric treatment" concept up here, but as soon as we got to England I saw where it came from. I guess survival in a monarchy has only been possible if you can be as ribald and satirical as possible. I remember a Rowlandson cartoon which merely consisted of a picture of two male feet in shoes lying prone between two female feet supine. It was a commentary from about 1800 on the Prince of Wales predilection for women "not of his class", deemed unsuitable for marriage.

The fact that Spitting Image was a popular show on British TV which said really shocking and scurrilous things about everybody, the Royal Family, politicians, celebrities, you name it is an example. The Smothers Brothers got the rug pulled out from under it for very tame satire by almost anybody's standards IMO, and there have been other examples. SNL is one of the few shows in the US that did political satire for an extended period of time. It wasn't until I settled in up here that I found Lorne Michaels (the producer and originator of the show) and Dan Ayckroyd (Jimmy Carter and that abusive right-wing news commentary person) were Canadian as was some of the production and writing staff. But thats all just my opinion of where that sort of freedom to criticize in a joking way comes from. Its just information and my observation. "Move along folks, there's no controversy here, nothing to see, move along."

Rob

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Since he gave up a lucrative law practice

In reply to: Quick tune in CBC if you can get it, there's a new programme

to be Imam, he has a conversation about whether that's [professional] "suicide", and then the fun begins. Happy Heard a piece on the show just this AM on public radio.

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