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problem with message Can't write to Disk in Drive C

I have a desktop PC with a 2.8Ghz pentium4 processor 80gb harddrive 90% free 512 shared ram running windows 98se. I am having a continuous problem when my screen is suddenly blue with the message ? Unable to write to Disc in Drive C data or files may be lost. Press any key to continue? When a key is pressed the screen goes back to normal but can almost immediately return to the message and can do this repeatedly to such an extent that in the end you cannot return to a normal screen. Then when you reboot you get a message ? One or more of your drives may have developed bad sectors, press any key to run Scan Disk. The yellow line goes up slowly then at completion another message ? examining Drive C? then the disc surface scan comes on and begins to check the surface. If let go this scan takes 9 hours and as a matter of interest I have on about 6 occasions let it run overnite and no problems are found and the next startup is Okay. But it is only a matter of time before the blue screen pops up again and the whole process is repeated and this is now daily. One can pass over the scan and continue to load windows but looking at ones Email. Looking at the website of a reputable electronics outlet,o r evn playing solitaire while offline can bring this on. I have used spysweeper, Norton Virus Scan, Ad aware SE pro, Spybot S& D, and have removed any spyware, I regularly use Executive Software diskeeper, System Mechanic registry cleaner etc. I also use Zone Alarm firewall and Norton 2004 antivirus. I have no idea what is causing this problem except to say it is becoming worse every night. Any assistance would be appreciated. burkemc@sympatico.ca

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Re: unable to write to disc in drive c

In reply to: problem with message Can't write to Disk in Drive C

Read through http://www.google.com/search?&q=%22Unable+to+write+to+Disc+in+Drive+C%22&lr= to see discussions on other instances of this error.

Without any research, I'm inclined to say it's time for either a new hard disk or a new motherboard. It must be a rather new computer, so possibly you still have warranty on the hardware? Then it's the makers problem, not yours.

Good luck,


Kees

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Unable to write to drive C:

In reply to: Re: unable to write to disc in drive c

I recently had the same problem and was about to throw in the towel after hours of scandisk and Norton Disk Doctor reporting no errors found. Finally resolved the problem by using Spinrite6 in Level 2 mode. I hope this cures your problem.

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RE:

In reply to: problem with message Can't write to Disk in Drive C

The yellow line goes up slowly then at completion another message ? examining Drive C? then the disc surface scan comes on and begins to check the surface. If let go this scan takes 9 hours and as a matter of interest I have on about 6 occasions let it run overnite and no problems are found and the next startup is Okay.

PART I:

1. IMO, you need to set your Scandisk options to only check files, not Thorough, which includes the surface scan too.

2. The "Type of test" -

? Standard checks the files and folders on the selected drive for errors.

? Thorough checks files and folders for errors, but it also checks the physical integrity of the disk?s surface. If you are running a Thorough test, click the Options button to specify which areas of the disk to check or which type of processing to perform. Select the options wanted, and then click OK.

a. By default the Thorough mode for Scandisk test the disk surface by reading and writing and reports if any bad sectors are found and requests a response. If the option, Disable write-testing has been disabled, Scandisk only checks the surface for read errors and does not perform the write test. With this option disabled, Scandisk performs its check much quicker but if you are experiencing hard disk read/write problems set this option to its default.

b. The read/write testing that Scandisk performs is not destructive -- there will be no loss of data. The content of each sector is retrieved into memory before sector testing begins, the sector is read and written to - based on the programmer's instruction, the data is either placed back into the verified sector or moved to a new one if there was a failure in the testing and then the block is marked bad. Using Scandisk in this manner is very time consuming.

PART II - check cabling or replace it/them and update BIOS:

1. The five main reasons a system BIOS does not detect the presence of a hard drive:

a. No power - drive does not spin up Diagram/Schematic, plus voltages, Large drive connector, Small drive connector, Y-splitter cable, Adapter to change a large-style drive (click to see an example screenshot)

b. Incorrect jumper setting (click to see an example screenshot) - consult the manufacturer's instructions for it, and any other drive previously installed

c. The 40-conductor IDE/ATA cable data cable, #1 or #2 (click to see an example screenshot) is faulty or not attached correctly - colored strip to pin #1
=or=
d. The Ultra DMA (80-Conductor) IDE/ATA Cable (click to see an example screenshot) is faulty or not attached correctly.

Blue: The blue connector attaches to the host (motherboard or controller).
Gray: The gray connector is in the middle of the cable, and goes to any slave (device 1) drive if present on the channel.
Black: The black connector is at the opposite end from the host connector and goes to the master drive (device 0), or a single drive if only one is used.

Note: The newer 80-conductors (wires) cable and plug does not have 80 pins on each connector, meaning the cable is pin-compatible with older drives and motherboards. The additional 40 wires don't carry new information and have been added to reduce interference and other signaling problems associated with higher-speed transfers to improve signal itegrity and therefore are connected to ground, interspersed between those original found on the older 40-conductor cable.

e. The BIOS has not been properly set for drive recognition, or the hard drive capacity is to large for the BIOS support (update it)

f. The hard drive is faulty.

2. Generally, if a computer hangs during the recognition process either before or after setting the system BIOS:

a. it is perhaps an indication that the system BIOS has a capacity barrier or cylinder limitation and does not correctly support the drive size

b. it is a possible conflict with another drive already on the same controller and if the drive is on a single controller by itself ensure that controller is turned on in the system BIOS and recognition has been performed.

? Remove the data cable for the other device on the same cable and try booting with the one hard drive only. If the system boots under this configuration, resolves the problem by making sure all jumper settings such as Master, Slave, and Cable Select are properly configured.

? Use software drive translation from the manufacturer who furnished the driver(s) to setup the hard drive in order for the BIOS to recognize and access the drive.

Warning: If a specific manufacturer's brand of dynamic disk overlay (the free software hard disk manufacturers include to allow access to the full hard disk volume on machines without BIOS support for large disks) was used previously for drive size configuration, there may be problems when trying to add a different manufactured hard disk to the same IDE channel in a master/slave configuration. The free versions of this software are generally tailored to work with a specific manufacturer's drive. It is quite possible that the only solution to solve problems of this type is to upgrade the BIOS hopefully and cease using drive overlay software.

? Acquire an upgrade for the system BIOS for huge hard drive recognition if applicable.

? When possible, connect the hard drive to a different controller -- insuring proper jumper configuration, to see whether a conflict existed with a like device on the data cable used previously.

PART III:

Also just an opinion since you're using Win9x, get rid of Norton.

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