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Question

Please help a newbie set up a wired network

Hi,
I want to set up a network for around 22 ip cctv cameras, 6 wireless extenders, nas drives and printers.
The building is 3 storeys (including the ground floor), we are refurbishing so cable runs should be fairly easy.

I am thinking of one patch panel and network switch on each floor, connected to the ground floor.

Internet access at the moment is through a bt business hub, but will probably change to a cable connection at sometime over the next year.

I am looking specifically for advice on what hardware to buy.
I am told that I should buy commercial grade router and wifi extenders as well as panels and patch panels, but don't know what brands and models these should be.
I'm also told that cat6 cable are best to future proof.
Any other advice would be welcome.

I am fairly handy, but don't have a great deal of technical knowledge.

Phil

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All Answers

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Answer
This is when...

In reply to: Please help a newbie set up a wired network

...you hire someone who does know how to do it, to come out and set up the system. Your local building codes may even require it, just like for electrical power lines.

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Good point.

In reply to: This is when...

I rarely find a new networker to understand when to use plenum rated cable or if there are codes and permits required for this work.

I was pretty annoyed in Massachusetts over this. I'm an old hand at networking but the codes there are geared to getting in the trades folk.

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reply

In reply to: Good point.

Hi,

Is plenum rated cable the same as Cat6?

I was planning to fit trunking, for the cable runs, then use a foam based fire brake in the trunking, for safety, when the cabling was completed.

Phil

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Reply

In reply to: This is when...

Hi,

Thanks for the reply, I would like to do this myself, just looking for advice.

There is no building code requirement for this, here.

Phil

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Then go ahead and use plenum rated

In reply to: Reply

So the next person doesn't have to redo all the wiring.

As to advice, this is far beyond a home network or even small business. For this you would take courses on how to do all this or just plow ahead and hope for the best.

There's a movie calls Spaceballs and there's a scene where Spaceball One went to plaid. Quite funny and it's about when folk get in over their head.

-> All that aside, with all those IP cameras I would be planning and using all Gigabit components. There are new networkers that ignore that then complain. Also we would not mix our IP camera network with our data network. But this is something you learn in your networking classes.

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reply

In reply to: Then go ahead and use plenum rated

Thanks for that.

Perhaps I should run the cables, mount the cameras and ariels etc, mount the panels and switches, then get someone with the appropriate technical knowledge to do the cable connections and set up?

I would like to spec and buy all the equipment myself, then look over the experts shoulder as he is setting it up, to pick his brains.

Does that sound like something that could work?

Phil

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Cable connections are first year tech work.

In reply to: reply

Applying RJ-45 jacks is first year apprentice work. Did you reveal you are very new as in never setup anything beyond a home LAN? Running the wires before a network designer gets a look seems to be like stepping off the curb without looking at the lights, traffic and both ways.

But hey, if you feel you can pull it off, why not?

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reply

In reply to: Cable connections are first year tech work.

Yea, I'm happy connecting the rj45 jacks to cable, I just assumed that someone coming in to do the software setup would perhaps feel more comfortable if they had done the connections themselves.

I am guessing that most difficulties in setting up would be traced back to connection faults.

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A big part of the design

In reply to: reply

Is to layout where to put the gigabit switches and reduce the wiring plant. Your designer would get an idea of the traffic for each camera and might group these onto a gigabit switch then uplink that to the NVR.

Done right, less cable and higher reliability.

I've see designs where the client had their video feeds on their LAN and what a POC that was.

They had commited to this and later had everyone complaining about the slow network.

This is not a system a newbie would tackle.

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cable's not that expensive

In reply to: A big part of the design

It's sometimes preferable to run double cable, just in case the one used has something happen to it, like a mouse chewing, an errant nail into the wall or stud behind the drywall, etc. Also to be considered is if a cable needs replacement, the old cable can pull the new through the walls if needed, but ONLY if the cable isn't tacked to studs along the route, so looser is better.

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I assume that means running a spare cable between

In reply to: cable's not that expensive

The switch boxes and the modem, as a backup?

All the cables will run in trunking, so reasonably accessible for the future, and I will leave a double length pull rope in place in case I want to run anything else in the future.

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Thanks

In reply to: A big part of the design

So I need to run the lan cable separately.
Got that.

I will use "gigabite poe+" switches, with a separate port for each camera.

Does that mean the lan cables need to go on a separate switch box, or can I just use separate ports on the same switch box?

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So do you know why?

In reply to: Thanks

Why would you move to Gigabit networking? Or are you completely reliant on forum advice?

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Completely reliable.

In reply to: So do you know why?

I think the extra cost wouldn't be so much in the scheme of things, and would give a little bit of future proofing, and possibly help to minimise any bottlenecks.

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It's because of the sheer number of IP cams.

In reply to: Completely reliable.

That's a lot of traffic.

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Answer
Not a newbie or even a normal consumer network.

In reply to: Please help a newbie set up a wired network

Either go with what you know works or have this one installed by a networking company and engineer.

In other words you did a Spaceball move and went to plaid (networking wise.)

As to commercial grade to many that's Cisco but then you get into configuration which is a nightmare the first year or so. Google Cisco Alternatives to find the other makers.

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reply

In reply to: Not a newbie or even a normal consumer network.

Hi,

Thanks for the quick reply.
I would like to do this installation myself, hopefully to learn about networking and how to maintain it while I am doing it.
I don't know what a "Spaceball move and went to plaid" means.

I have had a quick look at Cisco and alternatives, but am still struggling with understanding what I need.

Phil

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I think...

In reply to: reply

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