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PC randomly reboot after new GPU

My computer randomly reboot after I put in a GPU. I’ve reseated all components multiple times. Dust free. Bios updated. GPU drivers up to date using manufacture auto-detect installation. All components specifications set to default including bios settings, no overclocking.

I haven’t done stress testing because I’m not good with those readings yet. I thought about contacting motherboard manufacturer and graphic card manufacturer to see if both components are compatible together.

Mu guess at this point is reboot the pc over with fresh windows with default settings in case my other programs like adobe photoshop or big programs might of cause the random reboot. ——My other guess is maybe the graphic card is defect somehow. I do not think it is my tier 1 PSU causing the random reboot.

Lastly, I might just buy a new GPU to know if the current GPU is bad or my motherboard.... I might want to take it to a computer specialist and have them diagnose it in the end..basically I’m paying for knowledge.

Let me know your thoughts. Thanks.

My PC:

PROCESSORS: FX-6300 -

Motherboard: ASUS M5A78L-M/USB3 -

Memory Ram: 32g Ripjaw X

CPU Fan: Hyper EVO 212

Hard Drive: SSD 500gb EVO850

Power Supply: Corsair RM650X

Graphics Card: PowerColor Radeon R9
270 2GB 256BIT

Windows 10

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Comments
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Parts look old.

The R9 270 was sold years ago so I worry it's not "new." The 2GB 270 was shipped in 2014 so that's 5 years old right there. The motherboard had a new revision shipping in 2017 but the odd choice here is the old AMD. I'd go back to your working setup for now and ask if this is all that new.

The problem with this could be drivers or hardware. If you want to try the 270, start with a WORKING PC. Now run DDU then shut down. Now we are ready for the 270.

"GPU drivers up to date using manufacture auto-detect installation." is fine if it works but folk only bring me the times it doesn't. For the drivers we get them from the maker. Here's a primer on that:
https://www.howtogeek.com/233115/the-only-way-to-safely-update-your-hardware-drivers-on-windows/

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Yes parts are old

The only parts new is my SSD and the PSU Corsair Rm650x. If I remember right, majority of the parts are not new. My buddy purchased his PC from a no name website www.fxwarepcs.com - He claimed that the motherboard died a year later after he purchased it and sold me the entired PC for $100. So I put in a new SSD and PSU. But it sounded like the website sold him junk.

Well, your help and suggestions are taken into consideration. Yes the parts are old. I have no ways to test the Radeon R9 on a working PC to get a better testing results. I did gazed through the link you provided. It provides multiple ways to install hardware drivers and I might have to try the Windows 10 driver updates the next time around and try out the DDU.

Though regarding to your tips, I might have to purchase parts that are new in the future. As of now, I might have to purchase a new graphic card to find out who isn’t operating correctly. Thanks.

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Yes parts are old

The only parts new is my SSD and the PSU Corsair Rm650x. If I remember right, majority of the parts are not new. My buddy purchased his PC from a no name website ww.fxwarepcs.cm - He claimed that the motherboard died a year later after he purchased it and sold me the entired PC for $100. So I put in a new SSD and PSU. But it sounded like the website sold him junk.

Well, your help and suggestions are taken into consideration. Yes the parts are old. I have no ways to test the Radeon R9 on a working PC to get a better testing results. I did gazed through the link you provided. It provides multiple ways to install hardware drivers and I might have to try the Windows 10 driver updates the next time around and try out the DDU.

Though regarding to your tips, I might have to purchase parts that are new in the future. As of now, I might have to purchase a new graphic card to find out who isn’t operating correctly. Thanks.

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Was it working before you put in the new GPU?

If it was, then I'd take it and its drivers out and see if the machine is still working with the other changes you made. if so, run it for a while to shake it down. If it's stable, then you've eliminated everything except the Graphics card, it's drivers and the PCIe slot it was in.

If it isn't stable, you need to look elsewhere.

But if it's stable, you now have a working machine on which to carry out Bob's suggestions.

If you still can't get it stable, you perhaps need to seriously consider the age of some of the parts and decide whether to spend any more money on it or reclaim the usable components and start over with a newer specification, which all depends on your budget.

As those familiar with some of my earlier posts will know, I'm not averse to older machines, my current one is 2010, but when they die, spending money on them is rarely economic. Y.M.M.V.

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No Integrated Graphics?

Not 100% sure, but I don't think the AMD FX-6300 cpu has any onboard graphics. If the OP removes the Radeon graphics card then there may not be any other connection for his monitor ....

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More Details Would Help

You say it randomly reboots. Do you mean it reboots within one or two minutes after you turn it on? After an hour, or what? Is there any particular task you're doing when it reboots such as watching video, or using Microsoft Office, or editing photos, or what?

Possible causes of random reboot:
1. Bad RAM memory module. Remove all but one stick of RAM and test. Then test other RAM sticks one at a time to see if one or more are faulty. You can also test each RAM slot on the motherboard.
2. Are all RAM modules the exact same model? On rare occasions mismatched modules can cause random problems.
3. The power supply you installed may be faulty. You have reseated all components. Does that include reseating all power supply leads to the motherboard and other components?
4. There may be a bad component on the motherboard itself. It may have a 3-year warranty; worth checking. I once encountered a PC where there was a tiny screw underneath the motherboard and it was touching something, thus causing a short circuit and shutdown. This is so rare I shouldn't even mention it probably.
5. The heatsink/fan might not be seated correctly/firmly onto the cpu which can cause gradual overheating and reboot or shutdown. The thermal paste on the cpu might need replacing and the heatsink reseating.
6. Are all fans working? CPU fan, power supply fan, front and rear case fans?
7. The graphics card may be faulty. Substitute a different card. Newegg.com or Amazon.com probably have a low price card you could use for testing.

You can test a number of these possibilities yourself if you have the time and the inclination. If you do, please remember to unplug the power cord before opening up the PC case and ground yourself, preferably with a wrist strap.

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Another member shared where they saw the GPU RAM

GPU RAM went up and up and then it rebooted. I mention that because Zouch's GPU looks to be the same model. Zouch's PC is made of very old parts. This can lead to an almost never ending search of what is it? Most shops won't take such in as it's always a bad deal for the client. Unless the client agrees to replace what the shop thinks it will take.

I'd start with any part over 5 years old and replace the cheapest of those parts first. If that doesn't do it, move it down to 4 years and so on. When you can't nail what it is, the old advice is replace the cheapest (suspect) part first.

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