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Pastors want to pay more taxes

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I have a suspicion

that pastors figure that if the government can fool around with their canons, they can preach politics from the pulpit, and they are daring the IRS to come after them the same way the government has come after them over birth control. And BO thought this was over and done just because he said so.......

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One could say

the book of Revelations included a lot of politics in it. When preachers are speaking openly outside their normal venue for which they are paid, that's on their own time and own speech and there's not a thing the IRS can do about it. Oh, I wouldn't be surprised if the IRS tried, but if they get the entire Christian world in the USA pissed off too much, it's the IRS that will find itself in jeopardy of being censured, not the church.

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RE: When preachers are speaking
When preachers are speaking openly outside their normal venue

You've been fond of pointing out lack of reading skills lately

preaching sermons, from the pulpit to the congregation = outside their normal venue?

IF you feel that strongly about it, you'll have no objections to the Church paying taxes.
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All churches have already paid taxes

Their members paid them and the church receives "gifts". I think the area some groups will trip over is where they have items they actually sell and receive money. Freewill offerings with nothing received in return such as food, books, etc should still be tax free. Of course Charity work would be exempt too. Some church groups act like they are running a business for sales and I have no problem with that being taxed same as any other business doing the same. If the group entirely depends only on contributions, then there should be no taxes paid on that, being it's already paid by the member and given as a gift.

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(NT) I guess we're done talking about "normal venue"?
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sometimes the obvious

is overstatement.

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It's more face saving to change subjects

than to admit you misspoke.

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you're the only one changed it

They were "attending" a "summit" where it seems they would take turns delivering a message or sermon about something in the elections, which means some sort of conference, not their home pulpit.

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RE: They were "attending" a "summit" where it seems
They were "attending" a "summit" where it seems they would take turns delivering a message or sermon about something in the elections, which means some sort of conference, not their home pulpit.

let me point you towards the light, I'm not going into the light, you go. Devil

Pastors from around the country will come together to defy an Internal Revenue Service amendment that prevents pastors from endorsing any political candidate while they are behind the pulpit.

For the event pastors will take to the pulpit to preach sermons that will be focused on one political candidate and then encourage parishioners to head to the polls to show their support. The sermons will be recorded and then sent to the IRS.

"The purpose is to make sure that the pastor -- and not the IRS -- decides what is said from the pulpit...It is a head-on constitutional challenge,"


When they say "come together" it doesn't mean for a summit or conference.

Some reading for you.

tax guide for Churches and Religious Organizations
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I'm acquainted with that tax guide

Predominant black church groups either haven't heard of it, or totally ignore it, as evidenced by our dear old reverend Wright, Obama's politically spiritual mentor.

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(NT) Are you still claiming it's a "conference"?
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No, it's a summit

I just tried to explain what a "summit" was to you. Got it yet???

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RE: No, it's a summit

What is this "IT" you refer to?

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Will you promise to NEVER go into the light?

Heaven's feeling like a better place already! Devil oops, can that face make it there?

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RE:Will you promise to NEVER go into the light?

I'll do my best.

feeling like a better place already!


Especially now that I know you're already on the other side.

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I'm not in favor of pastors

making voting recommendations regardless of tax implications. We already have plenty of history to show what can happen when church and secular authorities get too close.

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I apologize and ask for your forgiveness

I apologize and ask for your forgiveness if I have offended anyone. (not my words)

Church Accused of Violating Federal Law by Telling Parishioners to Vote Against Obama

A church-state watchdog group has reported a Roman Catholic Church in El Paso, Texas, to the Internal Revenue Service.

The El Paso Times reports that Msgr. Francis J. Smith, the pastor of St. Raphael, had a message of retraction inserted into the church's bulletins on Sunday after the Diocese of El Paso was made aware of the situation last week.

"I am recanting the last two sentences from this statement as it was published on Aug. 5, 2012," the message says, according to the Times. "I apologize and ask for your forgiveness if I have offended anyone. The last thing I wish to do is be offensive to my faith and the faithful."

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He's supposed to keep his flock on the right path

And if voting for Obama is a sin, then he's got to tell them. Happy

Of course the easier way is to teach them what's moral and what isn't and then admonish them to use that as a rule in all aspects of their life, including whom they hire, whom they vote for, etc.

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and your second option done correctly

Is perfectly legal and correct, at least regarding voting.

Some views called moral might get you in trouble in hiring while not as a guide to voting regulations.

Not surprised you mention hiring, you've been there before, both in hiring and even in serving.

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That's kinda like

having a witness on the stand say something one side doesn't want heard by a jury and a judge telling them to ignore what they just heard. LOL Keep telling parishioners to vote for Romney then apologize....but not retract the telling. I love it.

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(NT) looking for a new Holy Roman Empire?
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you looking for

the old corrupt unholy Roman Empire?

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RE: I love it.

Me to.

but not retract the telling.

"I am recanting the last two sentences from this statement as it was published on Aug. 5, 2012,"

recant

To make a formal retraction or disavowal of (a statement or belief to which one has previously committed oneself).

recant

verb withdraw, take back, retract, disclaim, deny, recall, renounce, revoke, repudiate, renege, disown, disavow, forswear, abjure, unsay,

Smith could not be reached for additional comment.

It appears he doesn't want to say anything about anything now. I wonder what happened, no I don't, I have a pretty good idea.


BANG!!!!!!

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