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noisy computer

by fragile / November 4, 2003 4:21 AM PST

I have a custom-built computer with an ASUS A7N266-VM motherboard, AMD Athlon XP 2000+ processor. My sister recently bought a Dell Computer, and I am very envious of how quiet her computer is compared to mine. I added an exhaust fan to my computer shortly after I bought it, luckily the extra fan didn't increase the noise any. I believe the noise (typical computer loud hum) is coming from either the power supply or the CPU fan. Would it harm anything if I opened up the case with the computer running and stopped the CPU fan with a plastic pen or something similar for a second or two to see if that's where the noise is coming from? CPU fan is running at about 5800 RPM's, seems a little high compared to some other CPU fan's I've seen on the Internet, is that a typical speed? If it turns out that the noise is coming from the power supply, what should I look for in purchasing a quieter one? Any brand recommendations, or any other advice on reducing noise would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks... Eddie

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Re:noisy computer
by cartmanken / November 4, 2003 8:50 AM PST
In reply to: noisy computer

I would NOT try to stop the cpu fan. AMD chips run very hot and one little mistake with the cooler setup could cause immediate disaster.
My processor fan usually runs at 6250 rpm.
Antec makes 'silent' power supplies. Check for these and other brands with Google.

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Re:Re:noisy computer
by fragile / November 4, 2003 10:18 PM PST
In reply to: Re:noisy computer

thank you for the response, I will check out Antec.

Does your CPU fan seem to generate a lot of noise running at 6250 RPM's? By the way, if you are running an AMD processor, what's the average temperature it runs at?

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Re:Re:Re:noisy computer
by cartmanken / November 5, 2003 6:52 AM PST
In reply to: Re:Re:noisy computer

The cpu fan runs reasonably quiet and the temp runs from 49C-54C. BTW, I keep one case cover off for best ventilation.

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Re:noisy computer
by Steven Haninger / November 4, 2003 8:56 AM PST
In reply to: noisy computer

5800RPM does seem a bit high. My CPU fan runs about 2800 and I can scale that in my BIOS but tend to leave it alone. There should be no harm in temporarily stopping the CPR fan by carefully pressing a pencil eraser or something against the hub but avoid the blades. You may also unplug it. I would not disable it more than a few seconds...especially for Athlons as they they can enter 'Thermal Runaway" quicker than other processors. Before replacing this cooling source, I would check the CPU temperature to see if it can tolerate a slower fan. A fast running fan might be used to compensate for an inefficient heat sink as well. You can do the same for case fans as well. If the hum persists, it it probably the power supply fan or even hard drives. you need to rule things out until you find the culprit. If you do find the PS to be a high noise source, I can recommend getting an Antec True Power replacement. Go with 430 watts or so. These supplies have thermal controls on their own fans and a plug to control up to 3 case fans at a scaled down speed when heat is not a problem. Good luck.

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Re:Re:noisy computer
by fragile / November 4, 2003 10:12 PM PST
In reply to: Re:noisy computer

thank you for the response,

If it were the hard drive, would the noise be a constant smooth hum, even when nothing is being read from the hard drive? I just set my power options to turn off the hard drive after one-hour of inactivity, I'll see what happens when an hour passes.

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Re:Re:Re:noisy computer/I neglected to add
by Steven Haninger / November 4, 2003 10:39 PM PST
In reply to: Re:Re:noisy computer

Often hums and rattles are the result of sympathetic vibrations within the case and do not come directly from from a spinning component. Fans and hard drives can cause these noises. Sympathetic noises can be troubleshot by pressing your fingers against areas of the case, drive cages,etc. If no improvement is obtained by doing this, you case is solid and you are down to searching for the offending device. Another anomally can be a noise that rhythmically changes pitch. These are usually caused when the noise from two devices beat against each other and create a third noise. Strange! Fans and hard drives often cause this as well. My guess will be that your CPU fan is causing vibration which is amplified by your motherboard acting like a speaker cone.

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Re:noisy computer
by frankzxcv / November 5, 2003 10:48 AM PST
In reply to: noisy computer

enermax sells a nice power supply. not the cheapest option. --fj

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Re:noisy computer
by Willy / November 5, 2003 12:07 PM PST
In reply to: noisy computer

That's a very bad idea for two quick reasons: the fan on an AMD cpu needs constant operation as they are prone to quick failure upon heat build-up, then the actual stopping of fans themselves as many are of poor quality or at least are flimsy could break or later become bad.

However, the orginal AMD OEM fan setups are decent units and can be trusted to operation well. I suggest you look at *all* fans like the video gpu, power supply and case fans. Some maybe noisy only because they operate at a high speed and others get noisy when dust builds up. To be honest, alot of these fans just weren't made to be noiseless though some can be found. The best way to reduce noise is get a larger fan that operates slightly less rpms but moves as much air. One reason you start to see 120mm and 90mm fans for sale. If you want good advice check mod or overclockers websites for good fan reviews. Happy ------Willy

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fix noisy computers
by acmajhi / August 8, 2009 3:20 PM PDT
In reply to: Re:noisy computer

my cpu fan was running very fast. i tried a lot of software solutions like stopping services, uninstalling softwares but it was all the same.

The actual problem was the heat sink mounted on the CPU chip was not able to receive heat from the chip. Th e chip was getting hotter and in response the fan was running faster.

to solve the problem, i applied a layer of silicone grease (also called heat sink compound)on the chip-heat sink interface before fixing the heatsink in position. This led to effective removal of heat from the chip and the fan started running slower making less noise.

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