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NEWS - March 18, 2005

by roddy32 / March 17, 2005 8:46 PM PST
Security's new deal
By Dawn Kawamoto, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: March 18, 2005, 4:00 AM PT

Security companies have entered a new era: Buy or be bought.

Signs of the shift have appeared in a flurry of recent deals. Security giant Symantec is moving outside its niche with its pending purchase of storage maker Veritas Software. On the other side, networking company Cisco Systems and software giant Microsoft have snapped up fast-growing security companies, looking to give their own growth a boost.

This push toward diversification, coming amid widespread consolidation in many areas of the tech industry, has investment bankers and analysts wondering whether companies that specialize purely in security products can continue to thrive.

more here
http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-5624251.html?tag=zdnn.alert
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DrinkorDie pair convicted of software piracy
by roddy32 / March 17, 2005 11:03 PM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Published: March 17, 2005, 3:38 PM PST
By Graeme Wearden
Special to CNET News.com

Two men accused of taking part in a massive global software piracy ring were convicted in a British High Court this week.

Alex Bell, 32, of Grays, Essex, and Steven Dowd, 42, of Newton-le-Willows, Merseyside, were both found guilty of conspiracy to defraud. They will be sentenced in May, along with two other men who had pleaded guilty to similar charges.

more here
http://news.com.com/DrinkorDie+pair+convicted+of+software+piracy/2100-7348_3-5623999.html?tag=fd_nbs_ent&tag=nl.e703

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VoIP could provoke 'electronic Pearl Harbor'
by roddy32 / March 17, 2005 11:06 PM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Published: March 17, 2005, 11:17 AM PST
By Andrew Donoghue
Special to CNET News.com

The head of information security for the United Kingdom's Royal Mail has warned that Internet telephone applications will expose companies to hackers and malicious code if not implemented correctly.

Speaking at the annual Business Continuity Expo in London's Docklands, David Lacey, director of information security for the Royal Mail Group, said that he expects a widespread IT security incident to occur in the next two years, possibly as a result of companies hastily moving to voice over Internet Protocol technology without carrying out the necessary due diligence.

more here
http://news.com.com/VoIP+could+provoke+%27electronic+Pearl+Harbor%27/2100-7355_3-5623365.html?tag=fd_nbs_ent&tag=nl.e703

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California university reports data hack
by roddy32 / March 17, 2005 11:08 PM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Published: March 18, 2005, 7:00 AM PST
By Matt Hines
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

California State University, Chico, has informed more than 59,000 people that their personal information may have been compromised in an attack on the school's servers earlier this week. Stored on the hacked system were the records of a wide range of people with various ties to the university, including current, former and prospective students, as well as current and former faculty and staff. The school said the vast majority of the records involved belonged to students who began attending its classes within the past five years.

more here
http://news.com.com/California+university+reports+data+hack/2110-1029_3-5625599.html?tag=html.alert

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Hardware security sneaks into PCs
by Brent Welch / March 18, 2005 3:45 AM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Millions of workers will get the latest in PC security this year, but they won't get the full benefit. The three largest computer makers, Dell, Hewlett-Packard and IBM, have started selling desktops and notebooks with so-called trusted computing hardware, which allows security-sensitive applications to lock down data to a specific PC.

But Microsoft's plans to take advantage of the technology have been delayed, meaning the software heavyweight likely won't get behind it until the release of Longhorn, the Windows update scheduled for next year. That leaves hardware makers in a rare position: They are leading Microsoft, rather than working to support one of the software giant's initiatives.

http://news.com.com/Hardware+security+sneaks+into+PCs/2100-7355_3-5619035.html

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Microsoft Describes Spyware Categories And Responses
by Brent Welch / March 18, 2005 3:48 AM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Microsoft this week described how its forthcoming anti-spyware software classifies potentially harmful software and the actions it will let users take to prevent spyware and other malicious software from damaging PCs. The Windows AntiSpyware security software, current in beta testing, uses a library of more than 100,000 threats to identify potential problems and make recommendations to users as to whether the questionable software should be ignored, quarantined, or removed.

Microsoft's security software has been highly anticipated because its Windows operating system and applications have been the main target of viruses, worms, spyware, and other forms of malicious software that infect the Internet and servers and PCs. The seven-page white paper, entitled Windows AntiSpyware (Beta): Analysis Approach and Categories, says one of the problems with dealing with spyware is that much of it falls into a gray area, where it isn't clear whether the software is "bad" or "good."

http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=159901026&tid=5979

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This week in security
by roddy32 / March 18, 2005 5:04 AM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Published: March 18, 2005, 12:47 PM PST
By Edward Moyer
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

The issue of privacy remained very public this week, following ChoicePoint's recent data leak.

The company, which compiles electronic dossiers on Americans and sells them to insurance companies, other businesses and police agencies, apologized to a congressional committee for the mishap, which so far has led to 750 known cases of identity fraud.

CEO Derek Smith told the committee that the incident "has caused us to undergo some serious soul-searching." But Smith's remorse may not be enough to soothe the fears of lawmakers, who said they may clamp new restrictions on companies that amass and sell Social Security numbers and other personal information.

Such restrictions, however, might not be applicable to companies such as Amazon.com, which has irked privacy advocates with a system it's invented to gather clues about customers' gift-giving habits. Post a review of a book or other product on Amazon.com, and the information may find its way into the company's file on you. That's one key feature of the system, anyway.

more here
http://news.com.com/This+week+in+security/2100-1009_3-5626089.html?tag=html.alert

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Hackers build back door into iTunes
by roddy32 / March 18, 2005 11:02 AM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Published: March 18, 2005, 4:06 PM PST
By John Borland
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

update A trio of independent programmers has released new software that allows people to tap into Apple Computer's iTunes music store and purchase songs free of any anticopying protections.

Joined by Jon Johansen, the Norwegian programmer responsible for distributing DVD-cracking code in late 1999, the programmers say their "PyMusique" software is a "fair" interface for iTunes, primarily aimed at allowing people who use the Linux operating system to purchase music from Apple's store.

more here
http://news.com.com/Hackers+build+back+door+into+iTunes/2100-1027-5625991.html?part=dht&tag=ntop&tag=nl.e433

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Group urges more U.S. spending on Net security
by roddy32 / March 18, 2005 11:05 AM PST
In reply to: NEWS - March 18, 2005

Published: March 18, 2005, 11:23 AM PST
By Declan McCullagh
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

The Internet is "highly vulnerable to premeditated attacks" and more government spending is necessary to confront those vulnerabilities, members of a White House advisory committee said in a report made public on Friday. The President's Information Technology Advisory Committee includes representatives from Microsoft, AT&T, MIT and the University of Washington.

more here
http://news.com.com/Group+urges+more+U.S.+spending+on+Net+security/2110-7347_3-5625968.html?tag=fd_nbs_ent&tag=nl.e433

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