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NEWS - June 30, 2005

Tech firms call for approval of cybercrime treaty
By Declan McCullagh, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: June 29, 2005, 12:04 PM PT

Computer security and software companies are urging the U.S. Senate to approve the world's first treaty targeting cybercrime.

A letter from the groups, including the Business Software Alliance, VeriSign, InfraGard and the Cyber Security Industry Alliance, called on senators to ratify the controversial document, which was the subject of a brief flurry of attention last year before it expired without a floor vote.

"The cybercrime convention will serve as an important tool in the global fight against those who seek to disrupt computer networks, misuse private or sensitive information, or commit traditional crimes utilizing Internet-enabled technologies," said the letter, which was sent Tuesday. "It requires countries to adopt similar criminal laws against hacking, infringements of copyrights, computer-facilitated fraud, child pornography and other illicit cyberactivities."

more here
http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-5768462.html?tag=zdnn.alert
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Antispam proposals advance

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

By Paul Festa, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: June 29, 2005, 12:27 PM PT

An Internet standards group approved two "experimental" antispam proposals, sidestepping a controversy dividing Microsoft and its e-mail competitors.

The Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG), a division of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), said it would publish two competing and overlapping sets of documents that define ways of confirming that e-mail senders are who they say they are.

The experimental Requests for Comment (RFCs)--Sender Policy Framework (SPF) for Authorizing Use of Domains in E-Mail and Sender ID: Authenticating E-Mail--have been the subject of intense jockeying by Microsoft, America Online and others.

more here
http://news.zdnet.com/2100-9588_22-5768498.html?tag=zdnn.alert

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Senators propose sweeping data-security bill

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

By Declan McCullagh, CNET News.com
Published on ZDNet News: June 29, 2005, 9:00 PM PT

Corporate data-security practices would be hit with an avalanche of new rules and information burglars would face stiff new penalties under a far-reaching bill introduced Wednesday in the U.S. Senate.

The bill represents the most aggressive--and at 91 pages, the most regulatory--legislative proposal crafted so far in response to a slew of high-profile security breaches in the last few months.

"Reforms like these are long overdue," Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat, said in a floor speech. "This issue and our legislation deserve to become a key part of this year?s domestic agenda so that we can achieve some positive changes in areas that affect the everyday lives of Americans."

more here
http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-5769156.html?tag=zdnn.alert

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Weakness in the data chain

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

Published: June 29, 2005, 10:15 PM PDT
By Eric Dash
The New York Times

Inside the Tucson, Ariz., data processing center for CardSystems Solutions is a long room where dozens of computers are stacked in neat rows. This is the nerve center for millions of credit and debit card transactions. Its doors are bolted shut; access is restricted. Entry requires swiping a card and punching in a short code.

But all that physical security, as described by former employees, did not matter. CardSystems acknowledged this month that its computers had been attacked by thieves, putting the account information of 40 million cardholders around the world at risk.

more here
http://news.com.com/Weakness+in+the+data+chain/2100-1029_3-5769191.html?tag=fd_nbs_ent&tag=nl.e703

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ChoicePoint overhaul completed, company says

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

Published: June 29, 2005, 12:05 PM PDT
By Joris Evers
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

ChoicePoint, the data broker that leaked information on about 145,000 Americans, says it has completed changes to its business to prevent such a breach from happening again.

''In fact, we've gone beyond our announced commitments to make substantial changes in the past 90 days,'' ChoicePoint spokesman Dan McGinn said in an e-mail late Tuesday.

The Alpharetta, Ga.-based data broker is clarifying its position after a spokeswoman told News.com on Friday that the transition process was ongoing and that it would be some time before the company could announce its completion.

ChoicePoint revealed in February that scam artists had gotten access to personal data on tens of thousands of Americans, resulting in at least 750 cases of identity theft. The scandal has prompted calls for new legislation to protect consumers' privacy rights.

more here
http://news.com.com/ChoicePoint+overhaul+completed%2C+company+says/2100-1029_3-5768426.html?tag=fd_nbs_ent&tag=nl.e703

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Microsoft said to be mulling purchase of Claria

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

Published: June 30, 2005, 1:16 PM PDT
By Stefanie Olsen
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

UpdateMicrosoft is in discussions to buy controversial adware maker Claria, sources say, in a move to own an advertising network to compete with rivals Google and Yahoo.

Whether a deal will happen is unclear, according to sources familiar with the talks. But in the event that it does, Microsoft would likely face guff from consumer watchdogs for buying a company known for tracking Web surfers and delivering annoying pop-ups. (Microsoft's MSN Internet arm stopped selling pop-ups more than a year ago.)


Representatives for Microsoft and Claria declined to comment on any talks.

more here
http://news.com.com/Microsoft+said+to+be+mulling+purchase+of+Claria/2100-1030_3-5769583.html?tag=html.alert

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Attackers target Veritas security hole

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

Published: June 30, 2005, 2:00 PM PDT
By Joris Evers
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

A security flaw in a Veritas Software backup tool is being exploited to attack corporate systems, the U.S. watchdog for Internet threats has warned.

Malicious code to exploit a vulnerability in Veritas Software's Backup Exec Remote Agent for Windows is publicly available, the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team said in an alert Thursday. The organization has received reports of attacks and has seen an increase in scanning activity on TCP Port 10000, an indication that hackers are looking for vulnerable systems.

more here
http://news.com.com/Attackers+target+Veritas+security+hole/2100-7349_3-5770428.html?tag=html.alert

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Be aware of potential threats from port knocking

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

by Michael Mullins CCNA, MCP
Published: 6/30/05

Some of the newest and most complex Trojans utilize the "port knocking" method, which involves establishing a connection to a networked computer that has no open ports. Mike Mullins has the details of where these Trojans come from, how attackers activate them, and what you can do to keep them off your network.

Some of the newest and most complex Trojans utilize the "port knocking" method. This technique involves establishing a connection to a networked computer that has no open ports.

more here
http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-1009_11-5770469.html?tag=html.alert#

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Suspected file swappers arrested in global raid

In reply to: NEWS - June 30, 2005

Published: June 30, 2005, 1:26 PM PDT
By Reuters

updatePolice in more than a dozen countries have seized computers and made arrests in a crackdown on illegal file swapping instigated by U.S. investigators, the Dutch government said Thursday.

Authorities raided several locations in The Netherlands on Wednesday as part of an operation initiated by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation and arrested three people on suspicion of computer file sharing, the Finance Ministry said.

U.S. law enforcement officials said the action, which they dubbed "Operation Site Down," included more than 70 raids in the United States, as well as four arrests.

more here
http://news.com.com/Suspected+file+swappers+arrested+in+global+raid/2100-1027_3-5770035.html?tag=fd_nbs_ent&tag=nl.e433

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