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New X-Box 360 One Yr Warranty an Unhappy Experience!

by georgefman / December 23, 2006 3:24 AM PST

This review pertains to my unhappy experience with X-BOX support under their new, much lauded warranty extension from 90 days to one year.

From X-BOX web site:
"Our number one priority for the Xbox 360 is customer satisfaction," said Jeff Bell, Corporate Vice President of Global Marketing for Microsoft's Interactive Entertainment Business.

Under the new warranty, X-Box stated that my malfunctioning X-Box 360 would be serviced in the Texas depot via UPS ground, leaving me without a game console for my entire Christmas holiday.

I suggested alternatives such as a retail point of sale exchange or sending the replacement in the (MS provided)box I was to use for sending the bad unit.

Microsoft refused my suggestions and said I would have to do without my console until it was repaired.

I am not a satisfied customer. Microsoft's reply to my displeasure, "Write a letter."

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Standard policy...
by John.Wilkinson / December 23, 2006 8:24 AM PST

It may not be very convenient, but that is the standard policy for most companies, not just Microsoft. Unless it is winthin the store's return period (usually 30 days) you must wait for it to be shipped to and repaired by the manufacturer. Why is this? The warranty is through Microsoft, not the store, so unless Microsoft has a special agreement with Best Buy, Circuit City, etc. it is not the store's responsibility to handle it. To delve deeper, the underlaying problems are:

* The store would have to deal with customers unhappy with Microsoft, not them.
* The store would have to give you a unit they could otherwise sell.
* The store would loose potential business.
* The store would have to ship the defective unit to Microsoft.
* The store would have to request reimbursement from Microsoft.
* Microsoft not only would have to pay to ship and repair the defective unit but also be requested to compensate the store for lost business, an added expense.

As to your other suggestion, it is refused for two main reasons. First, they would have to ship you a new unit which is scheduled to be shipped to a store for sale. Also, and the more important reason, for a brief period you would have two Xbox 360s, one of which you did not pay for. They have no guarantee that you are not making the issue up and planning on keeping them both. Granted, they could sue you if that is the case, but it is additional concern and potential costs that they are not willing to accept.

I know how you feel for I have been in similar situations with defective merchandise but it's standard procedure for most companies because it's the best business strategy to keep the potential problems to a minimum.

John

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The rest of the story
by georgefman / January 11, 2007 12:09 AM PST
In reply to: Standard policy...

John,

Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

Your reasoning seems to support a retail industy centric business case, minimizing problems for industry, insisting the customer understand the "policies" needed to keep things moving right along. E.g., your comments, "The store; The store; The store; The store; The store; and Microsoft (the company). Best Buy said "The customer" Problem solved. Thanks Best Buy!

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