Question

New MoBo, CPU & RAM

I'm very interested in the new AMD Zen Core cpu that is slated to come out sometime in 2016. Unfortunately for my wallet, this will mean a new AM4 socket mobo which will also mean new DDR4 RAM. Choosing the compatible products when the time comes will not be an issue, but once they are swapped in... then what? I imagine my computer will recognize the new CPU upon boot and prompt me to enter the setup/BIOS. But isn't the BIOS on the mobo which is also new? Maybe I'm over thinking things and the computer will work out the new hardware on it's own, but it just seems like I'm going to run into a conflict somewhere and it won't be as easy as out with the old and in with the new. Here are the specs of my current set up:

ASUS Crosshair V Formula mobo
AMD FX-8150 cpu
Mushkin Redline DDR3 RAM (8gb @ 2133mhz o.c.)
Tt bigwater 760+ which won't be compatible with AM4 Sad

Any insight on what this swap is going to entail, outside of the physical swapping of parts, is greatly appreciated!

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Comments
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Clarification Request
Let's hear why you are doing this.

If it's for gaming, you don't change that CPU. It's more than enough for say 3 video cards. Noted at:
"Our tests demonstrate fairly little difference between a $225 LGA 1155 Core i5-2500K and a $1000 LGA 2011 Core i7-3960X, even when three-way graphics card configurations are involved. It turns out that memory bandwidth and PCIe throughput don't hold back the performance of existing Sandy Bridge-based machines. "
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-overclock,3106-4.html

The CPU is comparable according to http://cpuboss.com/cpus/Intel-Core-i5-2500K-vs-AMD-FX-8150

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Clarification

It is used primarily for gaming. I'm curious to know exactly why you advise against changing the cpu? You cited something about Intel processors which I'm not interested in. I have had good luck with AMD so far and I am intrigued with their upcoming line... just thinking toward the future. As for video cards, I currently use 1 EVGA Nvidia GTX760 which was an upgrade from a 460 a little over a year ago. Nothing wrong with the 460, technology just out grew it. It's collecting dust in the closet lol. The 760 will probably get upgraded shortly after the core guts. Baby steps.

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Simply because it rarely increase framerates.

But first, I cited the Intel i5 passage then compared to your CPU to show that these are about equal. With that out of the way we can see that changing the CPU up to even double the power may not increase the gaming experience or frame rate.

But hey, you can ignore all that and pump your money into areas that don't pay off.

You have the basic rig so my advice for gamers is the 970 or if you can, the 980.

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my bad

yeah, i missed the link comparing that i5 to mine. That being said, there isn't a game I play (at the moment) that I can't max out the settings and run @ 60+ fps. However, with the looming launch of Fallout 4 and future games, I just like to stay on the up and up with technology so I won't ever get to a point where I CANT run something maxed out. I know that place and i don't ever want to go back there lol. I guess if you reverse the jutsification and say I want the new mobo and DDR4 RAM and the new cpu is just the by-product, it doesn't sound so bad? Either way you shake it, my computer has always been my toy. That vice i shamelessly dump money into.

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If I was to do this.

I'd keep the base set and move up with SSD and 980 or the Titan. Having moved the entire office to SSDs the move was pretty painless and those that didn't think it was going to pay off have changed their tune.

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already have an SSD
Wink 80gb Intel and 1tb seagate 7200rpm
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That's no SSD.

That Seagate isn't a SSD and frankly a timebomb from my experience. Hope you are keeping backups current.

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I know

The Seagate isn't an SSD, I was saying the Intel is and I just have the large HDD for well... anything else. I also know how you feel about small SSD's but back when I bought it, it WAS big. To get a 240gb+ back then would have cost me one of my kidneys. I've had the Seagate for several years without even a hiccup. It's a champ. There is nothing to be backed up honestly so even if it failed, no big deal. No music, movies, pictures, or other miscellaneous files. It's really just for gaming and surfing the web (which might make you wonder why it's a terabyte in the first place). Anyway, since I have zero self control, I just thought I would update and let you know I just bought a GTX 980ti. My wallet hates me. Thanks.

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Here's what happened many times over the last months.

The PC is either booting but no Windows or one of the usual NT loader screens. There are some SSD+HDD combinations like yours too in the work.

The Seagate passes diagnostics yet you reload the OS and it still fails. Now that we've run into this too many times we pull the Seagate and slip in a new SSD or HDD and install the OS/data and it works again. Something is up with Seagates. The shop won't trust them when a machine comes in anymore. Even if they pass a diagnostic.

More at http://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/hdd-reliabilty-for-2014-is-out-scary-634896/

-> So with that out of the way. If you are having no issues, just backup on a schedule,

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Answer
Re: New mobo, CPU and RAM

That amounts to a new PC, so you do a clean install of Windows and all drivers for your OS.

Kees

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Clarification

yeah, I guess it pretty much does, doesnt it? lol. That wouldn't be the worst thing in the world. That's what I did when built this set up which has existed in its current state since like late 2011 or early 2012 (it's been a while, icr). The previous incarnation started as a store bought HP Pavillion (high school graduation present back in 2007) that was upgraded until space and motherboard capabilities became restrictive. I just grabbed an OEM copy of 7 off newegg and built a whole new machine.

R Proffitt - It is used primarily for gaming. I'm curious to know exactly why you advise against changing the cpu? You cited something about Intel processors which I'm not interested in. I have had good luck with AMD so far and I am intrigued with their upcoming line... just thinking toward the future. As for video cards, I currently use 1 EVGA Nvidia GTX760 which was an upgrade from a 460 a little over a year ago. Nothing wrong with the 460, technology just out grew it. It's collecting dust in the closet lol. The 760 will probably get upgraded shortly after the core guts. Baby steps.

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OEM OS

Those things are one machine only.
So if you go and change all that stuff add a new OS to you shopping list.

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Not so fast.

The OEM issue is a treacherous area. What you wrote is true for versions that came with say HP, Dell and such.

But to make it iffy, this has happened. A PC builder got a OEM builder's Windows and sure enough it locked onto the motherboard on activation. For reasons that are anyone's to guess Microsoft did not push it as 'the law' and allowed the builder to install a new motherboard and activate it again.

My guess along with others is that Microsoft does not want a court challenge to that agreement.

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