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network reconnect after reinstalling operating system

by pastormc / March 18, 2005 12:18 AM PST

We had a network established at out church, but the person that assisted us is no longer available. The system in my office had to be reformatted due to extremely slowed performance. The system now runs faster, it senses the network card, but I cannot get it to view the rest of the network. I know that it is a settings problem, however I do not know how to proceed. HELP!!!!

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Most common issue?
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 18, 2005 12:31 AM PST

The person who installed the OS used just the Microsoft Windows CD and has not found and install drivers for the machine's motherboard, network card and what else is in there.

Microsoft does not do this for us.

After this, I can't do much since I don't know the particulars of your network.

Bob

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Re: network settings.
by Kees Bakker / March 18, 2005 7:00 AM PST

Things to do at least:
Install TCP/IP (or possibly Netbios) and Client for Microsoft Networks (in Config Panel>Network) and be sure the workgroup name is identical to that of the other computers.
Of course, as Bob remarked, all drivers for the network (card) should be installed also.

Hope this helps.


Kees

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No OS mentions
by Merl Priester / March 18, 2005 3:24 PM PST
In reply to: Re: network settings.

XP only uses TCP?IP by default.
Previous OS didn't need IP addresses set but if you
do not have a DHCP server running, look for the IP address of an existing machine.

On XP, Start - Run - CMD (press enter)
type IPCONFIG and press enter.

A typical IP address is 192.168.0.XXX where XXX is from 1 to 254
The Subnet usually is 255.255.255.0

On the newly restored machine, set the IP address to
be 192.168.0.XXX where XXX is different than all the other computers on the network.

They each get 192.168.0. but the XXX is different on each.

On a Win9X box check IP by Start - Run - type in winipcfg and press ENTER.

In the drop down list box , select the NIC and it will show the IP address.

You will need to share folders etc again on the newly installed OS.

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Network Connections
by jkp / March 19, 2005 6:07 AM PST

Maybe the simplest solution is to convert your network to NetBEUI. Not only is it easy but it offers added security in that files shared only over NetBEUI can't be accessed from the internet. (Almost) full instructions are here: http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/netbeui.htm

The parts missing are the setup for your computer with respect to name, workgroup and sharing:

Right-click Network Neighborhood and select Properties. On the first page, ensure you have Client for Microsoft Networks installed. If not, click Add -> Client -> Add -> Microsoft -> Client for Microsoft Networks -> OK

Back on the main page double-click Client for Microsoft Networks and on the properties page, ensure Logon validation is NOT checked and Quick logon is selected. Click OK.

On the main page again, ensure "File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks" is present in the main window, if not, click the button labelled "File and Print Sharing..." to add it.

Now click the Identification tab at the top and ensure your computer has an unique name. Check another computer on your network to verify the Workgroup name (in Windows 98 it defaults to WORKGROUP, in Windows XP to MSHOME).

Follow the instructions from the link above with respect to bindings and then remove any protocols you never use. For example, if you never use dialup, remove Dialup Networking. As another example, my internet connection is via a wireless net card but local is via a normal card so I removed TCP/IP from the network card and removed NetBEUI from the wireless card.

Restart your computer and open My Computer. Right-click the drives or folders you wish to share, select Sharing and follow the prompts. Then enter the Printers folder and do the same thing for any applicable printer(s).

Try browsing your network. If nothing shows up, try using "Find Computer..." both from your own machine and from others on the network. If that works, you may have to reboot one more time, if it doesn't, go back and check your work. To verify your network card, check its properties in System Device Manager and try Start -> Winipcfg.

I've encountered one instance where the above did not work on a mixed 98/XP net. The solution was to replace all references to NetBEUI with IPX/SPX.

Note that if any networked computers are on XP, adding NetBEUI is a bit of a pain. The easiest way is to use the NetBEUI from Windows 2K available at http://members.cruzio.com/~tmieske/tkb.htm#w2knetbeui

John

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