Question

Moving files to a new folder, same drive.

Why I do this is unimportant. In Win 7, when I move my daily backup files (2 weeks worth about 20gb) from my current BU folder to my save BU folder, the move took a couple of seconds (I think because only the file pointers were changed.) Under Win 10, it takes in excess of 2 hours (I think there is a physical move of file data.) This is my third try since installing Win 10 on my (admittedly slow) server. Is there a way around this? Will renaming the files work?

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Answer
same drive

That's when you can use "cut" instead of paste fairly safely and the files stay in the same place, just the file table is changed to indicate their assignment to a different folder. No actual copying is done.

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More info Win10 AND OneDrive

Since it's finally after October 15th (drop dead due date for filing 2014 income tax returns) I've been able to a bit more testing. "Cut" and paste works as expected when the files are not sync'ed with OneDrive. Before I upgraded to Win10, I would cut the backup files from my current BU folder which is located in my OneDrive folder (on my C; Drive) and paste to my SaveBU folder (also on my C: Drive) which is not in my OneDrive folder and just the file table would be changed taking 1 to 2 seconds. Now the files are actually copied (or moved) to my SaveBU folder taking in excess of 2 hours (total file size is 33gb not 20gb as I previously stated). I'm not sure if the change is due to Win10 or to the "new OneDrive".

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do they owe you a refund?

If so, then you have up to 3 years to file for it. Those deadlines only hurt you if you owe THEM money still.

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Wrong Discussion?

Hi Jim,

Did you post this to the wrong Discussion? (Been there, done that!)

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Hope not

If you read Publication 17 for US income taxes, you will find what I mentioned about the 3 year period to file for a refund. Of course you may have been referring to some other country's tax schedule.

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OK

I'm a return preparer. Can't have returns hanging around. Thanks.

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Answer
So.... there's a cloud in the works?
https://www.google.com/#q=moving+files+in+dropbox+creates+a+lot+of+traffic is a search I used since no one I know uses OneDrive. It's entirely possible for a LOT OF TRAFFIC to occur if I move files to a new folder and these are on a OneDrive or Dropbox folder.

If there were no cloud, the MOVE happens without an actual copy operation. Files are just relinked to the new folder. HOWEVER if a cloud is involved there is usually going to be a lot of traffic as the folders re-sync. The local content on a local drive may happen in a split second, but OneDrive? Could be a long wait.
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Aye. There's the rub.

I don't know why the change by Microsoft, but I guess I'll have to live with it. Thank you for the link. Most informative. Since I currently have excess capacity on OneDrive, I'll try renaming my current BU to my archive BU name in the OneDrive folder, recreate my current BU folder, preform my full backup and then move my archive BU to my archive folder. I'm not talking about thousands of files here. As long as I choose a time of low office activity, I should be able to accomplish what I need to get accomplished. By the way, I'm only using the cloud for offsite storage of my encrypted backup files to cover me for a catastrophic event. It's not for group sharing or remote access.

Thanks again, all of you, for your consideration.

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Sounds like a plan.

While I write apps and more, I sometimes can't explain how it all works and how to work with how it works. Even that sentence can be confusing.

Sounds like a plan.

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encrypted files
"By the way, I'm only using the cloud for offsite storage of my encrypted backup files to cover me for a catastrophic event. It's not for group sharing or remote access."

Unless these files are in an encrypted volume and you then upload that encrypted volume, then instead your computer will decrypt them as it does when you access them and send the unencrypted version of the file to your offsite storage area.

If you want them to be stored encrypted, either the storage area has to encrypt them after sending, or you need to use truecrypt or some other program to encrypt them into a volume and send that instead.
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Encryption

Thanks Jim,
I use Genie backup software and I have set it to create 256 bit AES encrypted volumes.

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For levity, the 5 dollar wrench solution.
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Encryption

LOL Sweet!

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