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Moving Computer Hardware to New Case

by Austin4606 / December 7, 2014 3:55 PM PST

This upcoming Christmas i want to buy a new graphics card for my Acer Aspire X3950. But i believe its case is too small for the graphics card & even if it does fit i don't think it will get good airflow and it will probably be very cramped.


Due to this i'd like to move my entire motherboard & everything with it to a new case that i MIGHT buy. My parents have a old old oldddd case i could use. I dunno yet though... i'm not even sure if i can MOVE my motherboard at all.

<div>But since this is my first time attempting to even move computer components i thought i should get some help & see if it's even a good idea. The card i want to get is a Zotac GeForce GTX 970 4GB Video Card and it's

7.99" (203mm).</div>
Here are some photos of the computer:
Photo 1
Photo 2

My primary question is can i even take the entire computer components out & move it to another case, do i need to replace any cables,psu's etc and if i could move the hardware what case should i use?


I'd also like to mention i'm HOPING to get around $400 this Christmas. Probably will get $300 though.




And finally, here are the specs if you're too lazy to look them up.

--------------------

<span id="INSERTION_MARKER">intel(R) Core(TM) i3 CPU 540 @ 3.07GHz, 3067 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)
<span>

<span>4GB RAM
<span>

<span>(Other crap i'm too lazy to get right now since this took 20 minutes to type)

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All Answers

Best Answer chosen by Austin4606

Collapse -
new computer
by chrisverhoeven1983 / December 8, 2014 5:11 AM PST

hi austin,

First of all, good for you to want a new system.
To your questions. Usually you can disconnect everything from your old case and replace it into your new case.

Of what you say in the above, you might have some issues. First of all, by what i can see at your pictures is, that you have a small case, which means you probably have a u-atx motherboard. thats is a small type of motherboard. If you buy a new case, i would recommend buy a ATX or E-atx case. That is much bigger and will have the space for your hardware. 2nd problem you might have is, how many Watt powersupply do you have? if you buy a new graphics card, your power supply may not be able to handle it right. Because it have it's own power connector too. I know you say you get $ 300 or $ 400. Also, you have 4 GB of RAM memory at this moment. But i guess you would like to play the newer video games too. So you might have to upgrade to at least 8 GB of memory.

It's cool you bought yourself a new graphics card, but why not first check out if you can handle it inside your recent computer. Because when you buy componants like that, it's extremely important you also have good airflow inside your case. And the only way to do that, is to have a big enough case with enough fans to keep all the components cool enough during your gaming sessions.

Just let me know when you've read this and maybe i could get you some more tips.

Kind regards,

Chris

Collapse -
My Reply (1)
by Austin4606 / December 8, 2014 5:22 AM PST
In reply to: new computer

Thank you! Right after writing this topic i came across a completely different website with someone asking the same exact thing for the same exact model. Everything you said here someone else also said, they mostly mentioned a new PS & case.

I successfully found another graphics card that doesn't go over my budget and has great reviews, it can play most new games at High settings at a steady 40-60FPS and it's less than $200.


I also found a new case and PS. Here they are:
Case
Power Supply
Graphics Card

Would this work?

Collapse -
Answer
One thing I can tell you with almost certainty
by Steven Haninger / December 8, 2014 5:14 AM PST

Motherboards come with a rear cover plate that matches their I/O ports and this inserts into standard PC cases. If your PC is proprietary and doesn't use such a plate, you could have problems. As well, you may not be able to use your PS with a graphics card that requires more power. Make sure your old PC has a removable rear panel that can be installed in the new case. Take measurements if needed. Moving old hardware into new cases works sometimes and sometimes not...especially when the old PC is a brand name. Good luck anyway.

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