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More extreme fundamentalists?

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(NT) (NT) Same mindset, different issue, different faith.

In reply to: More extreme fundamentalists?

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Yes it does KP

In reply to: More extreme fundamentalists?

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KP since you didn't read the article before posting

In reply to: More extreme fundamentalists?

it let me be the one to inform you that the Hindus are moving away from this practice. The article states that child marriage is now mostly a phenomenon of the rural areas. Many Hindus no longer engage in this practice.
Have you never heard of a developmental model?

Religions change over time. Practices come and go.

Need we rehearse the long and tragic history of Christianity?

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long and tragic history of Christianity?

In reply to: KP since you didn't read the article before posting

I'll say far more joy than tragedy...and those tragic events some dwell on were never by any true Christian design. There's no rehearsing it any more. The "play" is in progress and quite long running.:)

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(NT) (NT) But Christians practiced them - as commanded by God

In reply to: long and tragic history of Christianity?

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I'm missing something

You said "But Christians practiced them...." What is "them"?...and who heard God's commands and carried them out.....or said they did?

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It was a response to the previous post

In reply to: I'm missing something

those tragic events some dwell on were never by any true Christian design

I'm just saying that the pogroms against anyone that wasn't a Catholic of the right flavor (sometimes if they were just a little richer than others) were tortured and killed.

Look at Joan of Arc. She was ostensibly burned at the stake for wearing men's clothing when the priests on up were running around in long skirts.

The Crusaders overran Jerusalem and killed every man, woman and child in the name of God.

Do you know who was the model for the code of chivalry? Saladine - the leader of the heretical Muslims.

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com
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Thanks for the explanation

In reply to: It was a response to the previous post

but I'll only off the same old copout that may be tiring. These were never commaned by God, IMO, but errant men. If you read more deeply into religious persecutions you will find these to be actually a chemically unstable mix of religious and political agendas. Such as the inquisitions (especially the Spanish) was a political purge of subjects falsely claiming to have converted to the kings religion to gain favor or avoid persecution. The simple truth was that few "catholics" probably really existed as real believers. They were what the king declaired them to be or else...and if the king said carry a cross into battle...they did....and the church was guilty of abetting this crime, IMO. There are reams and reams about this and, I would say, God was the alibi and not at the helm.

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That's well said Steven

In reply to: Thanks for the explanation

You are, however, stuck with the fact that God let it happen.

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(NT) (NT) and your point is?

In reply to: That's well said Steven

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My point is a question really.

In reply to: (NT) and your point is?

Why does god allow christians to commit crimes. More to the point,why does He allow them to commit crimes under His banner?

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God chose to give man free will. The ability to choose what

In reply to: My point is a question really.

he or she want to do. This was His desire and choice within creation. He said it was good. We do not have the mind of God. We cannot say why He does something. He has His reasons and acts for our good.

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It wasnt as good as he thought

In reply to: God chose to give man free will. The ability to choose what

After all, it was followed by the flood, and later by Jesus.

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How do you know it wasn't as good as He thought?

In reply to: It wasnt as good as he thought

Of course, man and nature fell when man chose to sin. This resulted in the flood, and necessitated what Jesus did, but we don't have the perspective to tell if that was an ultimately good or bad outcome. All we know is that God is working out His plan, and His plan is good for those who are His children.

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Sounds like today's suicide bombers

In reply to: Thanks for the explanation

These were never commaned by God, IMO, but errant men.

Actually the Spanish Inquisitons got a bum rap. The Jesuits decided early on that torture wouldn't get anything useful. There was less of this in Spain than in the other countries but they got the worse press.

You prove my premise that mixing religion and politics is dangerous.

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com
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Your premise?

In reply to: Sounds like today's suicide bombers

You said You prove my premise that mixing religion and politics is dangerous.

I fail to see any statement of "premise" and I certainly proved nothing....just added some additional thought to a subject bound for a trip to nowhere.:)

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Actually your premise

In reply to: Your premise?

If you read more deeply into religious persecutions you will find these to be actually a chemically unstable mix of religious and political agendas.

Sounds like mixing politics and religion is dangerous. How do you answer when your political leader is also your religious leader? Your political leader has the force of God behind him.

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com
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Sorry, but wrong again

In reply to: Actually your premise

By no definition did I premise (create a basis for arguement) anything I cared to pursue. I made a simple statement as counter to anothers. I then cited (to your reply) an example of (related to the first post to which I responded) a tragic event some seem to feel was entirely fomented by an errant early church...and I countered that it was not so but did not exonerate that church leadership's willful participation...only that I hold God as "not guilty". Perhaps you saw a ball that you wanted to pick up and run with. Please feel free to do so as I have no agenda nor understanding of where you wanted to go with this...if anywhere.:)

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No, the real lesson is that it is dangerous when the state

In reply to: Sounds like today's suicide bombers

takes control of the church.

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(NT) (NT) Or , even more ominously,when it's the other way aroun

In reply to: No, the real lesson is that it is dangerous when the state

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(NT) (NT) Standard fundamentalism.

In reply to: More extreme fundamentalists?

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