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Modern science education

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"The recommended value of 'g' has all the precision necessary for this examination," the statement read. It said students would not be penalised for using the correct value of 9.8 instead."

Whew!
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Its a disgrace

In reply to: Modern science education

Seems similar to the whole language fiasco.

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I just think it's funny...

In reply to: Its a disgrace

that they had to stipulate that no one would be penalized for giving the correct answer.

I don't really care that much about them changing the constant for the pupose of the test. No one does these calculations "manually" anyway.

When I took Physics (and dinosaurs roamed) we were allowed to use our slide rules on exams. I doubt that students today know what a slide rule is. I'm sure if someone handed me one today I would have no clue as to what to do with it.

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re:

In reply to: I just think it's funny...

"When I took Physics (and dinosaurs roamed) we were allowed to use our slide rules on exams. I doubt that students today know what a slide rule is. I'm sure if someone handed me one today I would have no clue as to what to do with it."

I laughed when I read your answer, because recently when a grandson and I were going through an old box we came across one and I had a hard time even explaining it... and when we looked it up, we discovered it is a hot collectable... Happy

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Great. Missed another opportunity.

In reply to: re:

Got rid of my slide rules decades ago.

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(NT) (NT) Still got my 12 inch Pickett, lost the 6 in one.

In reply to: Great. Missed another opportunity.

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(NT) (NT) I've still got 3 12" K&E's of different flavors

In reply to: Great. Missed another opportunity.

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Slide rule

In reply to: re:

You mean I can finally sell mine? I think I'll see if I can find it tomorrow and take a pic. I think it's somewhere stuffed in a bag of old papers back in my closet. It was mandatory knowledge for Physics and Chemistry class in the 70's. I think the digital calculators were just coming out then, mostly from Texas Instruments.

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found this.

In reply to: Slide rule

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(NT) (NT) Careful! You're dating yourself quickly! :-)

In reply to: found this.

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Maybe,but...

In reply to: (NT) Careful! You're dating yourself quickly! :-)

...it's been bugging me now trying to remember where I put it. I did go through a suitcase of old papers and things and an old briefcase this morning, but no luck. I've filed it in the back of my mind to keep an eye open for it. It may be with some old textbooks. Last time I remember using it was to amuse my teens by coming up with rounded off answers on multiplication and division faster than they could get it on their calculators. Of course the calculator carried it out to more places, but it was still fun irritating them with "outdated" methods at the time. That's the last time I remember it being out, a few years back. I may have given it to one of them. They were really impressed by it.

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I once had an accounting professor

In reply to: Maybe,but...

who challenged the class to calculate faster than he could to it on the blackboard with chalk. He won. Happy I suspect that hes been doing the same calculation for some time, but just the same, I figured we -should- have won.

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I fail to be amused, Ed.

In reply to: I just think it's funny...

And we wonder why Western nations lag behind in producing qualified young people in math, engineering and the sciences?

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Yes but considering that ...

In reply to: I just think it's funny...

... EVERYONE uses a calculator these days, keying in [9][.][8] vs. [1][0] only involves an extra key punch of the decimal point.

Evie Happy

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I'm assuming calculators were not allowed on the test...

In reply to: Yes but considering that ...

otherwise there's no particular advantage to rounding off the constant.

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It's much easier to remember for those who may be a little

In reply to: I'm assuming calculators were not allowed on the test...

deficient in the study realm.

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If calculators were not allowed on this test ...

In reply to: I'm assuming calculators were not allowed on the test...

... that is even more tragic.

As calculators (with memory capability) have advanced, it has been a bit more challenging as a teach to formulate problems that test comprehension vs. mere calculation. But it is essential that students are tested in at least semi real-world situations. That means, for the most part, that a calculator is handy ... even if it's the ''hunt and peck'' one that comes with Windows!

I DO try to have numbers work out somewhat better for my students in the science for non-scientist classes. But that means using other variables (like times and distances for gravity problems) that work out a little better. For the scientists, they should be used to things both working out "nicely" or getting results on the calculator out to ten places and rounding appropriately.

I still find this situation rather troubling, and even more troubling that an issue would even arise to give credit for the CORRECT answer a student would get using 9.8!

Evie Happy

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Close enough for government work. After all, we

In reply to: Modern science education

don't want to tax the minds of the little darlings, or create a new competitor for the US.

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Sheesh!

In reply to: Modern science education

Even for my science for non-majors needing a science with a lab to graduate, we use 9.8. Throughout my schooling we used 9.81.

With calculators, I don't see how using a round number makes the math that much different. OTOH, it encourages arbitrary rounding and accepting unacceptable (IMO) error.

*SIGH*

Evie Happy

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At least it is in Australia, not the US

In reply to: Modern science education

Though I wouldnt doubt that its happening here, too.

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