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Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

Is it "safe" to install Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1?

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''Yes!'' But do you need/want it?

In reply to: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

The .NET Framework is an integral Windows component for building and running the next generation of software applications and Web services that is software (component-based, plumbing-free design that minimizes the amount of code developers have to rewrite and maximizes potential for code reuse) that connects information, people, systems, and devices. It spans clients, servers, and developer tools, and consists of:

a. The .NET Framework 1.1, used for building and running all kinds of software, including Web-based applications, smart client applications, and XML Web services?components that facilitate integration by sharing data and functionality over a network through standard, platform-independent protocols such as XML (Extensible Markup Language), SOAP, and HTTP.

b. Developer tools, such as Microsoft Visual Studio

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Re: ''Yes!'' But do you need/want it?

In reply to: ''Yes!'' But do you need/want it?

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Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

In reply to: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

Walt,

I've got it installed on all our Win2000 and XP machines. We use the most recent versions of Microsoft Office, McAfee antivirus, and others, which use server connections for updates plus we connect with other federal and state agencies that utilize various shared resources. I'm not sure exactly what it does for us except that it seems to help when web services are shared between locations. Here's a link that explains some of the basics.

Defining the Basic Elements of .NET
http://www.microsoft.com/net/basics/whatis.asp

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

In reply to: Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

I'm on a standalone home system. I don't use any of the "shared" options of my Win XP.

Your reply regarding "...utilize various shared resources" etc., is the reason I asked about this. I don't want to unknowingly open up any more "holes" in my system. I've read about the .NET Framework 1.1 which also mentions "...connecting people better". I only wanted to run a software program not make connecting with others easier. See link: http://www.microsoft.com/net/basics/whatis.asp

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Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

In reply to: Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

Walt,

If you're not sharing files with anyone, there shouldn't be any "shared resources" security issues when installing .NET. If any security "holes" are to arise, it will be from the program installations themselve, not the .NET Framework. There are quite a few security options built into .NET including the "sandbox" model mentioned by Yewanchors below, but it's the client programming that will utilize such things.

http://www.devx.com/SummitDays/Article/6680

Hope this helps.

Grif

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Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

In reply to: Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

1. The article [Q312113] warns that if the .NET Framework is installed on a system that is running Windows XP (Start, Control Panel, Add or Remove Programs, and then scroll through the list), any process that uses the Performance Data Helper (PDH) functions to retrieve performance counters may stop responding ("hang") for 60 seconds and is caused by a bug in the .NET Framework performance extension Mscoree.DLL file, and that after the 60-second delay, the process exits as expected. Microsoft has confirmed that this is a bug in the Microsoft product, provides steps to turn off this counter by editing the system registry, but in my opinion it would be to your advantage to uninstall any feature not useful. The .NET Framework consists of two main parts: the common language runtime (CLR) and a unified, hierarchical class library that includes a revolutionary advance to Active Server Pages (ASP.NET), an environment for building smart client applications (Windows Forms), and a loosely-coupled data access subsystem (ADO.NET).

2. The article [Q827072] explains that when the Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 is installed on a computer and then Windows is restarted, the Welcome screen appears. This occurs because only one User account existed without password initially and this installation created a new hidden account named "ASPNET".

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Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

In reply to: Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

Thanks a MILLION for that info. I did NOT install .NET Framework and WILL NOT install it.

Thanks Again!

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Re: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

In reply to: Microsoft's .NET framework 1.1

Programs written using the .NET framework are supposed to be "sandboxed" so they shouldn't really be able to damage anything on your system unless you grant them additional freedom.

It can't really hurt to install it, but personally I wouldn't install it just for some simple freeware app that probably has a half dozen competitors that do an equal or better job.

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