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Mental Disorder among many troops returning home.

by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / June 30, 2004 10:23 PM PDT
Mental disorders are common for Iraq veterans, study finds
By Jonathan Bor
Sun Staff
Originally published July 1, 2004

Echoing Vietnam and other wars, combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan has triggered symptoms of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder among many troops returning home.

Researchers reporting in a medical journal today found that 15 percent to 17 percent of the combat troops who served in Iraq suffered from at least one of the three disorders - yet few sought help because they feared being stigmatized.

A somewhat lower proportion, 11.2 percent, reported symptoms of mental distress after serving in Afghanistan, but most also kept their problems secret.

"The message is that there is still a very large stigma in the military, as well as in civilian life, from seeking mental health care," said Lt. Col. Carl A. Castro of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, who was one of the investigators..........full coverage.

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Re: Mental Disorder among many troops returning home.
by Diana Forum moderator / June 30, 2004 10:36 PM PDT

I remember talking to my aunt about if my uncle had this problem after coming home from WWII. She said that he used to jerk in his sleep for years. She also said that they came home on a ship and it took weeks to get home. During that time the guys talked a lot of things out and resolved a lot of issues with others that went through the same nightmares.

The wars since then, Korea, Viet Nam, etc., haven't had that time to wind down. They got home in hours and all by themselves. Our loss.

And yes there is still a stigma attached to seeking help, not just for soldiers, but for cops and politicians. I think that talking to someone (preferably with someone who has been through combat) should be required so those that did need help wouldn't be singled out.

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

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Re: Mental Disorder among many troops returning home.
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / June 30, 2004 10:41 PM PDT

There must be some support groups for them out there. If any, I wonder if it helps? I also wonder if they'd ever recover from it and for how long?

I would think that with this disorder, it will affect family relationship tremendously. Sad

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Re: Mental Disorder among many troops returning home.
by Mark G / July 1, 2004 12:08 AM PDT

just from my experiance (2 tours nam) and fast trip home took me yrs to stop jumping from loud noises Sad

if my mom was alive you could ask her about my diveing over bushes now its a smile then was terror as i had no gun in my hand:)


its a ***** to come back state side like they do now it needs addressing

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Re: Mental Disorder among troops -- Remember Patton?
by Dave Konkel [Moderator] / June 30, 2004 11:30 PM PDT

Hi, C-L.

As most who saw Patton will recall, that famous General was temporarily stripped of command for slapping and calling "coward" a "shell-shocked" soldier in the infirmary.

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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Re: Remember Patton?
by jonah jones / June 30, 2004 11:45 PM PDT

he said "May God have mercy upon my enemies, they will need it"

i guess we all have different ways of saying things....

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Re: Remember Patton?....Yep....and
by John Robie / July 1, 2004 9:43 AM PDT
In reply to: Re: Remember Patton?

he also said:

"Why, by God, I actually pity those poor sons-of-******* we're going up against. By God, I do."

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Re: Remember Patton?....Yep....and also
by Dave Konkel [Moderator] / July 1, 2004 1:33 PM PDT

Hi, John.

My favorite is "Your job is not to die for your country. Your job is to make some other poor sonuvabitch die for his country!"

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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Re: Mental Disorder among troops -- Remember Patton?
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / July 1, 2004 12:34 AM PDT

Hi Dave K.

I must admit, I have no knowledge of what Patton is about. If you could direct me to read from an authentic web site about this subject, I would greatly appreciate it. I can do a search but I may end up taking from the not so cool sources.

===========================

I also need your assistant about a recent incident regarding "My Discussion" link.

When I first joined this forum, I noticed that I was automatically subscribed to all the threads I posted along with those I started.

I recalled posting an article that was deleted and since then all of the posts I had in "MY DISCUSSION" box dissappeared. I also recalled a message something like it is being "PULLED OUT". I also do not see my posts and replies being automatically generated into "MY DISCUSSION" box like it use to be. However, I never subscribed to any post even before and and after.

I believed all my postings are still available when I hit the numbered buttons or the next and previous.

Coud you please shed some light on this subject?


Thanks.

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Re: Mental Disorder among troops -- Remember Patton?
by John Robie / July 1, 2004 9:39 AM PDT

Well Dave has not answered, so I will.

You must not be a US Citizen or spent any time in the US, or missed world history learning of WWII if you "have no knowledge of what Patton is about".

The movie Patton can be rented at a video store, however it is usually shown on regular US TV channels more than once a year or on the Discovery/History channels of Cable TV or Satellite TV.

The last discussion of Patton is in this SE thread:
http://reviews.cnet.com/5208-6130-0.html?forumID=50&threadID=13818&messageID=156758

His famous speech, which is portrayed at the very beginning of the Patton movie:
http://www.townhall.com/columnists/rossmackenzie/rm20020606.shtml
other info about that speech:
http://www.pattonhq.com/speech.html

---------------------------------------------
Your posts can be obtained by just typing your user name in the Search box above or:
http://cma.zdnet.com/texis/forums/search.html?q=&qt=&p=Chorus-Line&a=&b=&fi=&f=1&o=d&m=

JR
Happy

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2ND-GEN *USA*/1ST-GEN*CA*
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / July 1, 2004 10:56 AM PDT
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umblical chord - sp correction.
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / July 1, 2004 11:10 AM PDT
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Re: umbilical chord - correct spelling
by jonah jones / July 1, 2004 4:52 PM PDT

from the book of "aird el yom bil teez el rada"

Wink

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Thanks for all the links
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / July 1, 2004 12:10 PM PDT

I had save them in my favorites. Will check on it later.

Hey! I see a smiley down at the buttom. Well, here's mine.
*
*
*
CL
Happy

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Re: Mental Disorder among troops -- Remember Patton?
by Tony Holmes / July 1, 2004 11:55 AM PDT
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Thanks !
by Chorus-Line A1-QMS / July 1, 2004 12:27 PM PDT

I may have come across many great names in the history but at the time, the subject just will not click and you do not get to learn it again until today.

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Re: Mental Disorder among troops -- Remember Patton?

Hi, C-L.

Probably the best thing to do to learn about Patton is go to Blockbuster and rent the (1970) multi-Oscar-winning DVD (or VHS) by that name, starring George C. Scott in the title role. It won Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay (one was Francis Ford Coppola), against some other great films (M*A*S*H and Five Easy Pieces, for two).

As for the "discussions, I've never messed around with it, so afraid I can't answer. I suggest you post that question on the "Forum Feedback" board.

-- Dave K, Speakeasy Moderator
click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

The opinions expressed above are my own,
and do not necessarily reflect those of CNET!

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you have entertainment confused with reality
by Edward ODaniel / July 1, 2004 5:16 PM PDT

don't rely on movies made for the purpose of entertaining and making money when there are many good books and biographies about the subject that are not influenced by flights of fantasy.

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Re: Mental Disorder among troops -- Remember Patton?
by Edward ODaniel / July 1, 2004 5:11 PM PDT

Hope you enjoyed the made for entertainment movie Dave.

Patton was NEVER "temporarily stripped of command for slapping and calling "coward" a "shell-shocked" soldier in the infirmary."

Although you should know the difference between an Evacuation Hospital and an Infirmary we won't hold it against you.

Patton visited the 15th Evacuation Hospital in Sicily in Early August of 1943 where he encountered Private Charles H. Kuhl. When Patton asked him why he had been admitted, Kuhl told him "I guess I can't take it." According to one eyewitness Patton "slapped his face with a glove, raised him to his feet by the collar of his shirt and pushed him out of the tent with a kick in the rear."

Two days later he sent a memo to his commanders regarding cowards going to the hospital claiming they are incapable of combat. The memo informed his commanders that they were to deal with it at the unit level.

5 days later at the 93rd Evac he found Private Bennett who claimed he couldn't stand the noise any more. Patton called him a coward and told him to stop crying then suggested he should be shot. He pulled his pistol but didn't shoot, he simply holstered it then struck Bennet twice.

Eisenhower was informed and wrote Patton telling him to apologize or make amends.

In January of 1944 General Clark took command of the 7th Army in Italy and Patton went to England to take command of the 3rd Army to prepare for the Normandy Invasion.

At NO TIME was he "relieved of command" either temporarily or permanently.

The CLOSEST he came to losing command was while in England before Normandy. In April of 1944 he made a speech using obscenities and remarking that it was the "destiny" of England and the US to rule the world that infuriated several people including Eisenhower. Eisenhower told General Marshall that he was seriously considering sending Patton home but he changed his mind because of Patton's importance. Instead he sent Patton a letter that said "You owe us some victories; pay off and the world will deem me a wise man."

History shows us that Eisenhower made the wise choice.

Don't rely on made-for-entertainment movies for historical fact Dave--that is what biographies are for (hint, hint). (unfortunately the Fort Knox Patton Museum site is mostly offline because of security concerns)

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Of course they have symptoms ...
by Bill Osler / July 1, 2004 10:59 AM PDT

There are multiple issues here, and I do not know which is most important:
(1) Depression and related disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, and they are likely to show up to some extent in any arbitrary population you choose;
(2) Psychiatric disorders are more common in people who are under severe stress. Guess what: soldiers have stressful jobs;
(3) Soldiers on duty have to do things that we have all been socialized to regard as unacceptable. How often do most people deliberately shoot at another person with intent to kill? (or any other intent)? That will inevitably take some toll.
From my perspective, the remarkable thing is not that a moderate number of veterans of combat deployments have mental health problems. The remarkable thing is that so few have such problems. That makes me suspect that the military is doing something in the training that helps the soldiers cope with these stresses.

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(NT) (NT) thanks for saying that Dr Bill
by jonah jones / July 1, 2004 3:54 PM PDT
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